Tag: Defense

Carmelo Anthony Panda

Melo thinks the perception of his defense is team-centric


Yeah, no, Melo’s not backing down on this criticism of his defense.

After saying yesterday that it was a matter of unfamiliarity last season and a flawed perception, Melo continued his media cruising for his shoe with a conversation with Grantland. And this time, it’s all about the team. Kind of.

You said you want the Knicks to be known as a defensive team. Where does that start?

It starts with everybody. But I was telling somebody earlier, it’s like New York has never been known for being a defensive team. It just so happened with the trade that happened with me coming here, it’s like New York is strictly an offensive team. But we want to end that. If I were to [go] to another team and they were, quote-unquote, “known for playing defense” then I’d be known for being the best defensive player in the league. But now I came to a team that’s not known for playing defense, it’s like “he’s the worst defensive player and they’re the worst defensive team.” But we can’t worry about that. We’re good. We know what we have to work on and talk is cheap.

Do you take it personally when people say that you’re not a good defensive player?

Absolutely, absolutely. I understand where it came from. I know why it was said, but that’s neither here nor there.

via Q&A: Carmelo Anthony – The Triangle Blog.

So the perception of him that was formed in Denver… was based out of the team he was traded to. Got it.

The thing is, there’s some truth going on here. Defense in the NBA is analyzed on two levels by most people. Effort and ability. Andrea Bargnani is a terrible defender because he doesn’t care. Steve Nash is a terrible defender because of his back and size. Neither of these analyses cover the fact that their offensive systems sacrifice several core defensive principles with the goal of increasing offensive percentages. If Anthony went to Boston, he’s going to be a good defender. He’s tall, athletic and has a high level of basketball intelligence. Trade Anthony for Pierce, and the drop-off is going to be negligible, if at all. Send him to L.A. and he’s another big player in a big front line.

But there are still problems. You can’t put Anthony on an island and expect him to hold his opponent scoreless in ISO. His communication is lacking. There are areas to improve. But the biggest issue is that Melo seeks to deny or alter the perception instead of taking responsibility. That’s the only way he’s going to grow into the defensive leader the Knicks need him to be.

Lakers don’t expect major changes to defensive scheme under Brown

Los Angeles Lakers Introduce Mike Brown

The Los Angeles Times’ Mark Medina recently sat down with Lakers assistant coach Chuck Person to talk about all things Lakers. It’s an interesting interview, and I recommend reading the full piece, but one particularly interesting part of the interview came when Person was asked about how the team will play defense under new head coach Mike Brown:

“I think the basic [defensive] scheme will be the same. We’ll keep the ball out of the middle of the floor, force the ball baseline without getting beat, come over from the weak side to do what we call “trap the box,” and make sure the ball stays out of the paint. We are going to shrink the floor and invite opponents to shoot with a contested hand on every shot, so that won’t change from last year. What will change is we will have the players be held more accountable for executing our defensive philosophy and defensive game plans from game-to-game. Mike won’t have any leniency when it comes to that end of the floor. He’ll allow them to make some mistakes offensively, but there won’t be much room defensively for guys to go off on their own and do things outside of the defensive system that we implement.”

Person notes that the team did implement a new defensive scheme last season, and it’s worth noting that the Lakers have been a top-6 defensive team in each of the last two seasons. Brown is known for his defensive coaching acumen, and the schemes he brought to Cleveland completely changed the culture of the team, but I don’t believe it would be reasonable to expect a similarly dramatic culture shift in Los Angeles next season.

Warriors GM says team is not shopping Monta Ellis

Monta Ellis tree tattoo

Monta Ellis’ name has popped up in trade rumors over the last few weeks, and some have been wondering if the Warriors have been shopping Ellis, who has been putting up huge numbers over the last two seasons while leading the Warriors to little success.

However, in an interview with Sports Illustrated’s Zach Lowe, Warriors general manager Larry Riley maintained that the team is not trying to shop Ellis:

“We are not shopping Monta Ellis. It is business as usual here. I think you have to look at what just happened in the Finals — it seemed like Dallas played pretty small guards throughout that series with Miami and did a pretty good job of it. Our problem is not the small backcourt. Our problem is defense.”

That’s an interesting statement, because the Warriors’ “small backcourt,” specifically Ellis, is one of the major reasons why defense has been such a problem for the Warriors, perhaps even the main reason. Ellis is a very talented scorer, but by all accounts he does not play defense, and the numbers show that the Warriors got much, much worse defensively when he was on the floor last season.

New coaches Mark Jackson and Mike Malone might be able to get Ellis to buy in to some kind of defensive system that can make use of his speed and willingness to gamble for steals, but right now it seems hard to believe that Ellis can be effective when he’s not surrounded by players that can cover for him on defense, which Steph Curry, Dorell Wright, and David Le cannot do. I encourage you to read the rest of the interview, which includes Riley’s thoughts on the team’s defense, new coach Mark Jackson, and the once-promising Andris Biedrins.