Tag: DeAndre Liggins

Adam Silver

NBA to review domestic violence policies in wake of NFL’s ugliness. It shouldn’t have taken that.


Greg Oden allegedly had a domestic assault situation last August. James Johnson was arrested on a domestic abuse charge in June and in July signed a two-year deal with the Toronto Raptors (charges against him were dropped). Former Thunder player DeAndre Liggins had an ugly domestic abuse case filed against him (he is now out of the league as well). Three other NBA players and one assistant coach had domestic abuse charges against them dropped.

That is all within the past 12 months.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver shouldn’t have needed a public scandal in another sport to make him understand that domestic violence was a serious issue and one that impacts the NBA directly. This is something the league should have taken more seriously long ago.

But the public relations disaster around the NFL and the Ray Rice case certainly caught the Commissioner’s attention. Silver spoke on Monday to announce a genuinely good New York City based NBA Cares project tied into the All-Star Game there next February (repairing a Staten Island court damage by hurricane Sandy), but when the media got to talk to him they had more serious questions and domestic violence is on that list. Ian Begley of ESPNNewYork.com was there.

Again, Silver doesn’t need the NFL, he can look at his own crime blotter and see the problem. There can be a culture of entitlement and being “above it all” that comes with the confidence needed to become a professional athlete, something as true for guys coming into the NBA as it is in the NFL. A discussion of domestic violence during the rookie training program is not enough.

Changes need to be made. Silver and the league needs to be more proactive than the NFL and its commissioner have been (although that’s a low bar to clear).

The NBA’s long-standing policy on all arrests and legal matters has been to let the judicial system play out then base any punishment off that outcome. Will that work anymore? (It certainly would not have been good for the NFL in the Adrian Peterson situation.) The CBA does give the NBA wide latitude if it wants on these cases. The NBA needs to be more proactive here — it can’t eliminate the situations but it needs to deal better with the ones it has. The league took no action on the cases already mentioned in this post (some charges were against players out of the league, others the charges were dropped). The problem is with the cases that were dropped (we don’t know what really happened in those situations), or in future similar situations, a player suspended without pay after an incident who then sees the charges dropped will have grounds to challenge the league. However, we also know that a lot of clear cases of abuse see the charges dropped for a variety of reasons.

Unfortunately, Silver will be put to the test on this sometime sooner rather than later. It will be interesting to see how he and the league (and teams) respond, especially if this is a name player and not just an end-of-bench guy, because there will be a much brighter spotlight on them now. Sitting back and ignoring the situation is no longer an option.

Clippers sign Australian forward Joe Ingles


The follow-up moves have been completed.

The results, at least for this season, of the Jared Dudley trade are in.

The Clippers swapped Dudley and a lottery-protected first-round pick for their own 2015 second rounder and the ability to sign three of Ekpe Udoh, Chris Douglas-Roberts, Hedo Turkoglu and Joe Ingles.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Ingles, a 6-foot-8 forward, earned this contract while playing for Australia in the World Cup. He’s a real shot maker – going 23-for-33, including 6-for-9 on 3-pointers, in the tournament.

This gives the Clippers 16 players, and since I’m guessing Ingles required a guaranteed contract to jump to the U.S., DeAndre Liggins probably won’t last past the preseason. The Clippers also run out of room for Ray Allen.

Was all this worth dumping a first rounder? I’d say no. Udoh, Douglas-Roberts, Turkoglu and Ingles are all nice value for minimum salaries, but they’re still minimum-salary players who don’t really move the needle. And don’t forget, the Clippers now have $950,000 dead-weight cap hit each of the next five seasons.



ProBasketballTalk 2013-14 Preview: Oklahoma City Thunder

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Durant reacts during NBA Global Game against Fenerbahce Ulker in Istanbul

Last season: The Thunder finished the regular season with a record of 60-22, which was good for the number one playoff seed in the Western Conference.

Thanks to the unfortunate knee injury that occurred in Game 2 of the team’s first round playoff series against the Rockets, however, OKC quite literally limped to the finish line, and was overmatched by a Memphis Grizzlies team in the second round that took care of them easily in five games.

Signature highlight from last season: The play that was most impactful was, of course, Westbrook’s injury in the playoffs. But let’s keep it positive here, and with too many ridiculous Kevin Durant highlights to choose from, let’s go with this explosive dunk from Westbrook on the break that he threw down over Golden State’s Stephen Curry.

Key player changes: OKC didn’t make any additions that would lead you to believe the roster this year is better than it was a season ago, and lost it’s only reliable scorer from the bench unit in free agency.

  • IN: Rookies Steven Adams (drafted with the 10th overall pick) and Andre Roberson (drafted with the 26th overall pick by Minnesota, then dealt to OKC on draft night) are the only new faces with guaranteed contracts in place for the coming season.
  • OUT: Kevin Martin was allowed to leave in free agency, and although he got more from the Timberwolves than he would have been worth to the Thunder (especially when retaining him would’ve meant entering luxury tax territory), his loss will be noticed, especially in the early part of the season. Ronnie Brewer was a midseason acquisition, but he didn’t have much impact and ended up signing with the Rockets this summer.

Keys to the Thunder’s season:

1) The health of Russell Westbrook: We know Westbrook is going to miss at least the first 4-6 weeks of the regular season following an additional knee surgery that took place just recently. What we don’t know is how long it’ll be before he returns to form as one of the most dynamic and explosive players in the game today.

The timeline of Westbrook’s ascent back to the player he once was is going to make all the difference in how the Thunder’s regular season plays out. The team is obviously looking at playing deep into the postseason, after finishing with 60 wins last year and making it to the Finals in the season before that. But in the midst of a crowded Western Conference stacked with at least six powerful teams, finishing lower in the standings will make the desired playoff results that much more difficult to achieve.

2) The development of the bench: OKC traded away James Harden before the beginning of last season, and while history is not going to look kindly on the deal from the Thunder’s perspective, at least they got a semi-serviceable scorer in Kevin Martin in return who could fill that role off the bench. With Martin now gone in free agency (and with no one added to replace him), the Thunder are going to need to get production from the reserve unit somewhere if they’re going to be able to compete with the league’s elite teams.

The hope is that Reggie Jackson, who saw heavy minutes during the playoffs and performed better than expected, can continue to develop into a reliable contributor that he’s already shown signs of proving to be. But it would be nice if Jeremy Lamb, DeAndre Liggins or one of the freshly-drafted rookies could contribute as well, and there’s just no guarantee that they’ll come along as quickly as the Thunder need them to in order to remove some of the burden from the starters’ shoulders.

3) Kevin Durant, MVP? This could be the year that Kevin Durant unseats LeBron James as league MVP, for a variety of reasons. First and foremost on the list could be voter fatigue — we all know that James is considered to be the game’s best player, but if the Heat coast a little during the regular season and Durant is forced to put up ridiculous numbers to keep his team in the hunt while Westbrook is out, it would be easy to see him quickly becoming the favorite to take home the award if those making the call are looking to give it to someone besides James.

Durant is capable of dominating offensively, and will be expected to do so with his All-Star teammate sidelined. He could take on an even bigger role as the season progresses depending on Westbrook’s recovery and whether or not he gets much help from his teammates. If he puts up MVP-caliber numbers, there’s no reason the Thunder can’t be right where they need to be by the time the season concludes, despite all of the apparent challenges.

Why you should watch the Thunder: Durant and Westbrook are arguably two of the league’s top-five players. Beyond that, the intrigue with this Thunder team runs deep. Can Durant carry them to a high place in the regular season standings, or will the team collapse under heavy expectations, and due to Westbrook’s injury and the lack of a capable bench? There’s drama here, and that’s exciting.

Prediction: 53-29, good for a top-five finish in the West. Durant will need to come through with that MVP season for the Thunder to be in the championship conversation, especially in a deeper-than-usual Western Conference. While he’s certainly capable of that, the questions surrounding Westbrook and the reserve unit are too plentiful for the team to warrant anything more than a forecast of a similar outcome as it experienced a season ago — a second round playoff loss.

Friday And-1 links: The sad tale of Korleone Young

korleone Young
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Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points more than Brazilians like spectacular soccer goals….

• If you read one thing today (besides this blog), it should be the great work by Jonathan Abrams at Grantland looking at one of the big preps-to-pros busts, Korleone Young.

“As he walked through the doors, I was listening to him,” said (Joe) Dumars, now Detroit’s president of basketball operations. “When he got on the court, you could see he had talent, but you knew the process was going to be hard because he was just so young for the league. He sounded like a young high school kid all of a sudden thrown into the NBA world.”

• Here is an oral history of how the Celtics drafted Len Bias.

• Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert seems as confused as a number of other Browns fans about recent developments with that team.

• Former Thunder player DeAndre Liggins was formally arraigned on domestic abuse charges. Pretty horrific ones.

There is no one way to build a championship team.

Hakeem Olajuwon said he was impressed with the chemistry Jeremy Lin and Dwight Howard were developing. That statement came as a surprise to Lin.

• Will Rodney Stuckey or Kentavious Caldwell-Pope start at the two for Detroit (my money is on Stuckey).

• How far did Rocky Balboa run in the Rocky II training sequence? Longer than a marathon.

• The Sixers worked out a deal to bring Vander Blue to training camp.

• Orland will invite Second-round pick Romero Osby, plus Solomon Jones, Michael Eric, Manny Harris and Kris Joseph to training camp.

• Unable to impress a team at Summer League, Jonny Flynn has signed to play with the Sichuan Blue Whales in China.

• Finally, is the Kings’ Isaiah Thomas better than Kyrie Irving?

Ugly details emerge in domestic violence case involving former Thunder player DeAndre Liggins

DeAndre Liggins

DeAndre Liggins was waived by the Thunder on Friday, in the wake of domestic violence charges levied against the second-year NBA player who had a non-guaranteed contract to play with OKC this upcoming season.

Like all cases involving athletes or anyone in the public eye, the charges are going to get reported before anyone has been convicted of anything. But in the case of Liggins, the alleged details that have emerged are fairly ugly.

From Matt Dinger of NewsOK.com:

Liggins, 24, is charged with three counts of domestic abuse, two counts of domestic assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, one count of kidnapping and one count of violating a protective order. …

According to a probable cause affidavit filed in the case, an argument between Liggins and his girlfriend, Jasmine Horton, at the basketball player’s Oklahoma City home on Aug. 31 led to Liggins grabbing Horton by the hair, pulling her out of bed, throwing her to the ground and punching her 11 or 12 times. Most of the blows struck the back of her head, the affidavit states.

Liggins left the bedroom and Horton locked the bedroom door, but Liggins kicked the door open, grabbed her by the hair and threw her to the ground, where he again punched her, then stomped and kicked her on the head and back, the affidavit states.

Both incidents were witnessed by the couple’s 2-year-old son, according to the affidavit.

Liggins is then accused of throwing an Xbox and box fan, striking Horton in the head with both items. Liggins and Rogers would not let Horton leave and blocked the doorway, but she managed to escape the house twice. Both times, Rogers grabbed her and dragged her back inside the house, according to the affidavit.

There’s more, and believe it or not, it gets worse.

Any NBA player on a non-guaranteed contract would see the same result from the team holding his rights, even before a trial or conviction. The sad truth is that teams will put up with a lot of off-court nonsense from elite-level talent, but if you’re a fringe player without a guaranteed deal in place, you’ve got to handle your personal business a lot more smartly than this.