Tag: David West

David West, Patty Mills

Report: David West likely to sign with Spurs or Wizards


David West wants to join a championship contender.

Naturally, he looked first to the Warriors and Spurs, the last two NBA champions.

Now, the market appears to be clarifying his options.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

If the Spurs don’t sign LaMarcus Aldridge, David West makes a lot of sense as a fallback option. He’s not nearly as good as Aldridge, but West fits the same style as a jump-shooting power forward. And after trading Tiago Splitter, San Antonio would need another big and have the cap flexibility to get one.

The Wizards could offer West the mid-level exception ($5,464,000). He’s not the 3-point-shooting stretch four they really desire. But he might be the best big they can get, and he’s a good mid-range shooter. Washington would probably offer only a one-year contract, preserving cap space next summer for Kevin Durant.

Report: David West interested in Warriors and Spurs

Draymond Green, David West

David West said he wants to play for a championship contender.

He already put his money where his mouth is by opting out with the Pacers and forgoing a guaranteed $12.6 million. He’s unlikely to recoup that money as a free agent.

But just how much is he willing to sacrifice?

Sam Amick of USA Today:

According to a person with knowledge of his situation, the free agent forward … has serious interest in playing for the San Antonio Spurs or the Golden State Warriors.

The Warriors have the taxpayer mid-level exception ($3,376,000). Perhaps, they’d sign West and trade the similarly styled Marreese Speights ($3,815,000) to save a little money – savings that would be multiplied due to the luxury tax. Or they could keep both and have riches of big-men depth with Draymond Green, Andrew Bogut and Festus Ezeli. That becomes more palatable if West will take a minimum contract.

The Spurs could look to West if they strike out on LaMarcus Aldridge. If they get Aldridge, they’d still have the room exception ($2,814,000), though that probably goes to Tim Duncan or Manu Ginobili. Most likely, West would have to take a minimum contract.

If he wants to win a title, though, Golden State and San Antonio are excellent places to look.

Lakers, Knicks struggle on hectic first day of free agency

150702 philjackson

There were clear winners on the first day of NBA free agency, where an estimated $1.3 billion in contracts were handed out. The Cleveland Cavaliers are getting the band back together, reaching deals with Kevin Love, Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert. The Golden State Warriors kept Draymond Green in house. The Toronto Raptors impressed and signed DeMarre Carroll. The Pelicans re-signed Anthony Davis and Omer Asik. The Phoenix Suns landed Tyson Chandler and re-signed Brandon Knight, then impressed LaMarcus Aldridge. The Spurs also impressed LMA and they re-signed Danny Green at a great price. The Hawks retained Paul Millsap.

As Knicks rookie Jerian Grant said: “Is this free agency or Oprah? You get a max, you get a max, you get a max…”

Yet, the Lakers and Knicks were left standing there, empty handed.

Early in day two of free agency, the Knicks landed Arron Afflalo, a nice pickup but not the game changer their fans have been hoping to see.

These are two of the games biggest brands, in the nation’s two largest markets, both with plenty of cash to spend on free agents, yet both looked woefully behind the times and unable to adjust to the new realities of the NBA.

It is just one day and both will get chances at other big names — the Knicks have long been linked to Greg Monroe, and the Lakers had the opportunity to pitch him as well (update: Monroe chose the Milwaukee Bucks). DeAndre Jordan and others are still on the board.

But both franchises are learning hard lessons.

Free agents now want more than off-the-court opportunities, they want to see a path to winning. Fast. They can live and work out in Los Angeles in the summer if they want the perks of the city, they want to be shown the analytics of how this team can help them win on the court. Now. Social media has altered the world of off-the-court endorsements, being in a big market isn’t as big an advantage as it once was. Today’s free agents want to know how the team can help them grow their brand by landing them on the biggest NBA stages — the playoffs, The Finals, prime-time games on Christmas Day, All-Star Games.

And right now, the Lakers and Knicks are bad basketball teams.

David West was blunt about it talking about the Knicks.

Those struggles on the court permeate the teams’ big pitches to free agents.

The Lakers were one of the co-frontrunners to land LaMarcus Aldridge heading into free agency, and they got the first meeting with the All-Star forward. But their most dynamic speakers are the people on the business side of the equation, Aldridge was left wanting on the basketball side. From a source that spoke to Mike Bresnahan of the Los Angeles Times.

Aldridge considered the Lakers to be part of a “two-horse race” with the San Antonio Spurs and “wanted to be wowed” but was actually turned off by the lack of analytics on the basketball side of their presentation, according to the person….

The Lakers also contended that their analytics outline would have been stronger if they had a better roster last season. The team privately expressed envy that Houston’s presentation could be boasted by stats and on-court analysis of a team with James Harden and, indeed, Dwight Howard.

The Rockets are also far more invested in those analytics. Meanwhile, the Lakers are trying social media campaigns that both seem dated and that the NBA made them take down anyway.

To a degree, this is the impact the other 28 NBA owners wanted with the new Collective Bargaining Agreement — they wanted to take away as much of the inherent advantages of big, profitable franchises as they could. They made the price for continually exceeding the luxury tax so onerous — not just financially, but taking away sign-and-trades and limiting cap exceptions to big-spending teams — that everyone is far more on the same financial playing field.

The Lakers and Knicks have seemed slow to adapt to that new reality. Around the league, they are seen as two teams less willing to embrace the analytics that have driven teams like Golden State, San Antonio and Miami in recent seasons. Both Lakers coach Byron Scott and Knicks head honcho Phil Jackson have at points dismissed the value of the three-point shot. You can try to defend the context of those statements, but the impression was left of two dinosaurs trying to win their same old-school way.

The reality is that rebuilding can be slow and hard. The Lakers can point to an excellent young core of players — D’Angelo Russell, Julius Randle, Jordan Clarkson — and try to paint a picture of how there is hope for the future of the franchise in their hands. It’s a good picture — but players like Aldridge, at age 30, are not going to wait around for that moment. They want to see good basketball teams now. The Lakers and Knicks are just not that.

Free agency is far from over; all is not lost with either of these franchises this summer. As noted before, Monroe is certainly in play, and with the cash to spend the Lakers and Knicks are going to get the attention of other quality players still on the market.

But day one was rough in Los Angeles and New York.

David West says the Knicks aren’t good enough to sign him

Indiana Pacers v New York Knicks

Remember when the Knicks thought they had a chance with Marc Gasol?

How the feeble have fallen.

Not even David West – who was reportedly headed to New York – will sign with the Knicks. He makes that darn clear.

Bob Kravitz of WTHR:

This is the type of foresight Carmelo Anthony might lack. West doesn’t want to take a big payday and get stuck somewhere he doesn’t want to be.

West, via Kravitz:

“At this point in my career, it’s all about winning, and again, I don’t want to be in a position where we’re just fighting to make the playoffs, I want to be in a spot where we can legitimately taste the finals,” West said.

For what it’s worth, West also didn’t like the Pacers’ public case to convince Roy Hibbert to opt out. West, via Kravitz:

“That’s one thing where I wish they would have handled better was the situation with Roy,” West said. “I’ll be honest with you, that bothered me a little bit, and I told Roy that. I’m the type of guy who feels like we’re all in this fight together and I’m not designed in that way to put it all on one guy. That did rub me the wrong way. That threw me off. I started reading some of that stuff, I started thinking, ‘Whoaa.’ I just didn’t feel good about that. I told Roy that it bothered me, that he’s still my teammate.

Hibbert opted in, and West opted out.

Now, West is seeking greener pastures. He’s obviously serious about winning over money – he opted out of $12.6 million – and he should have his pick of teams. Anyone should want West on a minimum contract, and most contenders (at least the ones not over the apron) should like him on a bi-annual exception. Someone might even give him the mid-level exception.

The bigger challenge is finding a contender where West would play a reasonably large role.

Are the Raptors, with DeMarre Carroll in the fold, good enough? Would a minimum salary convince West to back up Blake Griffin on the Clippers? How about West signing for less than Marreese Speights and allowing the Warriors to trade Speights?

West will have options. The less money he’s willing to take, the more teams that will pursue him.

Report: David West ‘very likely’ to sign with Knicks in free agency

Indiana Pacers v New Orleans Pelicans

When it was reported that David West would decline his player option with the Pacers for next season to become an unrestricted free agent, it was at least a little bit of a surprise.

West could have earned $12.5 million next year by staying in Indiana, and then entered free agency right as the salary cap is set to spike in advance of the 2016-17 season.

But at age 34, and after playing 12 NBA seasons, West wanted to try to secure a multi-year deal now instead. And, it appears as though he already has his sights set on his next destination.

Jared Zwerling of Bleacher Report:

League source: David West is “very likely” to sign with the Knicks come FA. “He knew that before he chose not to opt in” with the Pacers.

It’s unclear what the Knicks would offer West, but even if he were able to secure a two-year deal in the $8 million per season range, he’d already have set himself up to receive a nice little raise.

West has a reputation of being one of the league’s actual tough guys, and is someone whose leadership style has traditionally commanded the respect of his teammates behind closed doors. Carmelo Anthony is more the lead-by-example type, so depending on who else New York is able to add in free agency, a veteran voice like West’s should be a welcome locker room addition.

West averaged 11.7 points, 6.8 rebounds and 3.4 assists in 28.7 minutes per contest with the Pacers last season.