Tag: David West

The 2015 ESPYS - Arrivals

Fast Break notes: Baron Davis is honest about the draw of the NBA

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If you’re reading this in August, you’re probably an NBA junkie. Just like us. Even now, there are so many great NBA-related stories being told we at PBT can’t get to them all in our regular posts, so we’re passing a few along in a bullet point format. Enjoy.

• I’ll admit my bias up front — I love Baron Davis. Ask me “who are your five favorite players to watch all time” and Davis makes my list. When he is healthy and in a groove, there is simply nobody like him with a great game IQ and flair. He wrote a brutally honest piece for NBA.com about his story since he had to be carried off the court at MSG in 2012, and it is a must read.

Once I got hurt and carried off that court in 2012 in Madison Square Garden, the Mecca and grand stage of basketball, I told myself it was over. Just forget you ever played and don’t bring it up. If anybody tries to remind you how much you love it, just brush it off as something that you were good at a long time ago. Give yourself amnesia. Tell yourself you hate playing the game and it will be easier to move on.

My grandmother always told me to have something to fall back on. “You’re not going to be able to play forever. You’re a good basketball player, but you are also good at other things. You could get hurt the way you play out there, like your life depended on it.”

• What’s it like to be a vastly underpaid NBA cheerleader? Not as glamorous as you’d think.]

• Celtics fans, you can relax. Kelly Olynyk is doing just fine.

• This is fantastic work by our old friend here at PBT Matt Moore — now with CBS — on what the LaMarcus Aldridge signing means to the Spurs on the court.

• If an NBA player signs with Toronto he pays more taxes, right? Not so fast, my friend.

• Everyone lauded the pickup of David West by the Spurs, and at the cost it is a total steal. But that doesn’t mean he’s a fit with the second unit.

Five glue guys to watch this season.

• Stephen Curry is taping Riley’s ankles for the season.

Must run in the family……. Photcred: @dmarjones

A photo posted by Wardell Curry (@stephencurry30) on

• Victor Claver is signing in Russia.

• Andre Drummond is working on his moves.

Great workout today with my og Joel Anthony, shoutout to @remyworkouts for getting me together today ! Pt1

A video posted by Andre Drummond (@andredrummondd) on

Report: Thunder to open 2015-16 season at home against San Antonio on October 28

San Antonio Spurs v Oklahoma City Thunder - Western Conference Finals Game 6

The full schedule for the 2015-16 regular season is expected to be released this week, but bits and pieces of it have been trickling out ahead of the announcement. The Oklahoman‘s Darnell Mayberry is reporting that the Thunder will kick off their season at home against the Spurs in what should be a pretty great matchup:

This will be a phenomenal game, assuming everybody’s healthy. The Spurs made the biggest free-agent acquisition of the summer in LaMarcus Aldridge, and stole David West for the veteran’s minimum. Kevin Durant played just 27 games last season after undergoing foot surgery, and the Thunder expect the 2014 league MVP to be healthy to start the year. There’s a very good chance this matchup could be a preview of the Western Conference Finals, as it has been twice before.

Stan Van Gundy second-guesses himself on Pistons’ handling of Greg Monroe

Cleveland Cavaliers v Detroit Pistons

By this summer, it was too late. Greg Monroe was done with the Pistons, and he signed a three-year max contract with the Bucks.

Given the circumstances, Detroit made relatively good use of its freed cap space – trading for Ersan Ilyasova, Marcus Morris and Reggie Bullock.

But could the Pistons have handled Monroe better?

They had opportunities.

Shortly after being hired as president/coach, Stan Van Gundy called Monroe and Andre Drummond “an ideal pairing.” Yet, Van Gundy refused to trade the player who most interfered with a Monroe-Drummond pairing – Josh Smith. Van Gundy even regularly started Smith before waiving him.

Going back, Detroit offered Monroe a lucrative, but not max, contract when he was a restricted free agent last summer. He accepted the qualifying offer, setting up his unrestricted free agency this summer.

The Pistons still could have traded him, but they needed his consent. It seems they aimed too high. Maybe Monroe wouldn’t have approved a deal, but few situations would have been worse for him. Even if he would have lost his Bird Rights, that wouldn’t have mattered if he were leaving Detroit anyway.

Not giving Monroe a max offer last summer, forcing Monroe to play with Smith, not trading Monroe – does Stan Van Gundy regret any of that?

Van Gundy on the Lowe Post:

I’ll be honest. I go back and forth on it. I really do. Because I think Greg is an outstanding player, and I think he’s a high-character guy as well, and I think that those are the guys that you generally want to build around.

But I don’t think that he and Andre Drummond are the best fit. Not saying you couldn’t make it work, but certainly not the best fit. First of all, I think the game is moving smaller and quicker as it is. The teams that have continued to play with two big guys, at least one of them is, at least one, if not both, are guys who can step away and make shots. Indiana played with David West. Memphis plays with Zach Randolph. Those guys can all go 17, 18 feet and make shots.

Basically, what we were trying to do is play with two centers. And if you’re going to max Greg out – which he’s certainly worth the max; there’s not a question with that – then you’re going to try to do it with two centers.

And as much as it was a little bit tough on the offensive end, the real problem was at the defensive end. I mean, it’s just really tough. We put Greg in some tough situations, and he did a good job, as good a job as he could. But you’re asking him to guard stretch fours like Kevin Love and things like that.

You can’t sign him to a max, you can’t sign Drummond to a big contract eventually and then just say they’re going to share the center spot. That doesn’t make any sense. So, I went back and forth with it on Greg, and I still do. Part of me is wondering whether we made the right move, quite honestly, letting him go. Because he’s a talented guy. But the other part of me says we were never going to have the fit that we needed to move forward.

And I think from Greg’s point of view, I don’t think there was much doubt – certainly we didn’t feel much doubt – that Greg was gonna leave.

I generally agree with Van Gundy’s assessment of the situation. I disagree with his handling of it.

First, I think Monroe was worth a max contract last summer. Even if he weren’t an ideal fit with Drummond – Detroit’s franchise player – Monroe still would have had plenty of trade value. Given the number of teams that offered him the max in free agency this year, I think the Pistons could have eventually traded Monroe for a better return than Ilyasova, Morris and Bullock.

That’s especially true if the Pistons had dumped Smith sooner. The 2013-14 season proved Smith, Monroe and Drummond couldn’t effectively play together. But Van Gundy wanted to see for himself, and that further alienated Monroe from the Pistons.

I don’t blame the Pistons for not offering Monroe max in 2014, though. Challenging him to sign an offer sheet they’d match was sensible. No player as good as Monroe had ever accepted the qualifying offer. It wasn’t reasonable to bank on him becoming the first.

For what it’s worth, there’s no guarantee Monroe would have accepted a max offer from the Pistons last summer. There was a report he wouldn’t, and Van Gundy talked to Zach Lowe about it now:

I don’t really know last summer. But Greg had, at that point, a lot of misgivings and, quite honestly, again, we didn’t know our team real well. I’d had six weeks here, and were pretty conservative in what we willing to do money-wise. We did offer him a contract that would have made him our highest-paid guy, but we didn’t go to the max.

At that point is where Van Gundy and I really disagree. Once Monroe accepted the qualifying offer, the Pistons had to trade him. They could have sold him to a contender as a rental. I can’t believe Monroe, after all that losing in Detroit, would have rejected a chance to play for a winner. Whatever the Pistons could have gotten, as long as it didn’t interfere with their 2015 cap space, would have been better than riding out a lost season with Monroe.

The Pistons aren’t in a bad spot now. Their roster better fits Van Gundy’s system. But they lost a major asset in Monroe with only the resulting cap space in return, and it’s easy to find a few points they could have avoided that fate.

No wonder Van Gundy is second-guessing himself.

For what it’s worth, that’s a healthy approach. The Pistons clearly have an introspective leader, which him more likely to handle the next dilemma better.

Gregg Popovich expects Tim Duncan to play the “same boring game” as usual

Tim Duncan, Gregg Popovich

For almost two decades, the Spurs have been clinically dominant. They’ve won five titles since 1999, anchored by one of a handful of the greatest players ever in Tim Duncan and one of the three of four best coaches of all time in Gregg Popovich. Throughout that time, the Spurs have been called “boring” by fans and the media, because of their dependable excellence and consistency. Even Popovich agrees with that assessment, but it gets results.

Here’s what Popovich said in a recent interview on SiriusXM’s NBA channel, when asked what he expects out of Duncan in his 19th season with the Spurs:

“Same boring game. He’s going to come to the game, he’s going to score ‘x’ number of points and ‘x’ number of rebounds. He’s going to lead, he’s going to tell me what to do during the game and then we’re going to go home. It’s going to be the same routine as usual.”

That sounds about right. Duncan showed no signs at all of slowing down last season, making third team All-NBA and second team All-Defense at age 38. And the Spurs’ summer additions of LaMarcus Aldridge and David West only add to their frontcourt depth and lessen the load that Duncan will have to carry. It’s tough to project the Western Conference playoff picture in August because there are so many elite-level teams, but there’s not a team that’s clearly better than the Spurs. Their chances to make the Finals are as good as anyone’s at this point.

Tony Parker says for Spurs this is “last crack at it to try to win it all”

Tony Parker, Tim Duncan

San Antonio won the offseason.

They landed LaMarcus Aldridge. They brought back Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. Tim Duncan agreed to return. They got David West to decide to come for pennies on the dollar. They improved one of the best rosters in the NBA last season. They even won Summer League.

The Spurs are a title contending team, but one in a loaded Western Conference. What could make the difference is hunger — which team wants it the most? Which team plays with the right level of controlled desperation?

Tony Parker says don’t count out the Spurs in that category. Parker did an interview with France 24 and said he and the team realizes this is their last shot with this core (via the San Antonio Express-News).

“It’s been an unbelievable summer for us. LaMarcus is going to help us a lot. I’m so happy that Manu and Timmy are back. And so we’re going for a last try, a last crack at it to try to win it all.”

For the Spurs, Warriors, Clippers, Thunder, Rockets and maybe Grizzlies, the first key in the West will be just staying healthy. There is no margin for error.

But after that it will be about desire, about execution, and in the end about matchups come the playoffs. And in what will be the last year for Duncan and Manu Ginobili, not to mention David West’s long career, there will be plenty of desperation and energy in San Antonio. Predicting things in the West now is impossible, but in the end expect the Spurs to be in the mix.