Tag: Darren Collison

Stephen Curry

67RIEFNS No. 7: Warriors’ starting lineup


The NBA is full of talent, personality and suspense. During the doldrums of the offseason, It’s easy to forget how wonderful the league can be. So, I’ve assembled 67 Reasons I’m Excited For Next Season (67RIEFNS). They’ll be presented in no particular order.

Bob Myers’ hard work paid off.

The Warriors general manager’s painstaking pursuit of Andre Iguodala included convincing Iguodala to sign while simultaneously clearing the necessary the cap space – and it worked.

The result? Iguodala turned the Warriors’ starting lineup into one of the NBA’s most effective and complete units.

Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Iguodala, David Lee and Andrew Bogut dominated last season.

Of the NBA’s 30 most-used lineups, none had a better net rating than the Warriors’ starters, who outscored opponents by 15.4 points per 100 possessions.

And they did it by dominating both ends. Their offensive rating (112.4) and defensive rating (97.0) would have both led the NBA.

Here’s how the league’s 30 most-used lineups stacked up offensively and defensively. (Click here for an interactive version where you can mouse over each logo to see players and exact offensive and defensive ratings.)


  • Bottom right: above average offensively, above average defensively
  • Top right: above average offensively, below average defensively
  • Bottom left: below average offensively, above average defensively
  • Top left: below average offensively, below average defensively

Peerless far into the bottom right, that’s the Warriors’ starters.

Within the 30 most-used lineups, only two were better offensively – one on the Clippers (Chris Paul, Darren Collison, Matt Barnes, Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan) and one on the Timberwolves (Ricky Rubio, Kevin Martin, Corey Brewer, Kevin Love and Nikola Pekovic). With Collison on the Kings and Love on the Cavaliers, neither lineup will be around this season.

Likewise, the only better defensive lineups – the Suns’ Eric Bledsoe, Goran Dragic, P.J. Tucker, Channing Frye and Miles Plumelee; the Bulls’ Kirk Hinrich, Jimmy Butler, Mike Dunleavy, Carlos Boozer and Joakim Noah; the Pacers’ George Hill, Lance Stephenson, Paul George, David West and Roy Hibbert; the Wizards’ John Wall, Bradley Beal, Trevor Ariza, Nene and Marcin Gortat; and Charlotte’s Kemba Walker, Gerald Henderson, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Josh McRoberts and Al Jefferson – have broken up with Frye in Orlando, Boozer in Los Angeles, Stephenson in Charlotte, Ariza in Houston and McRoberts in Miami.

Yet, the Warriors’ top lineup remains.

Between Curry, Thompson, Iguodala, Lee and Bogut, it’s difficult to find a skill left uncovered.

Curry and Thompson bomb away from beyond the arc. Lee scores inside. Curry and Iguodala keep the ball moving. Lee and Bogut clean the glass. Bogut protects the rim. Iguodala and Thompson defend perimeter.

The puzzle pieces fit seamlessly.

Steve Kerr, please don’t mess with this lineup. It’s basketball bliss.

Report: Ramon Sessions signs 2-year deal with Kings

Ramon Sessions

The Kings had a pretty good point guard in Isaiah Thomas on the roster last season, but didn’t want to pay what he would cost as a restricted free agent.

Sacramento completed a sign-and-trade to send him to Phoenix on a deal worth $27 million over four years.

Darren Collison was added in free agency, a player that the Kings believed would be an upgrade over Thomas, especially defensively. But they grabbed another veteran point guard just to make sure that depth is accounted for at the position.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Free-agent guard Ramon Sessions has reached agreement on a two-year, $4.2 million deal with the Sacramento Kings, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Sessions, one of the best available players left on the market, will join free agent Darren Collison and rookie Nik Stauskas as fresh faces in the Kings’ backcourt rotation. The Kings are using the bi-annual exception provision to sign Sessions.

This is a solid signing for the Kings, and it could easily be argued that Sessions is the best point guard on the roster, and deserving of a spot in the team’s starting lineup.

Sessions spit time between Charlotte and Milwaukee last season, after being dealt from the former to the latter in a trade deadline deal. He finished out the year with the Bucks averaging 15.8 points, 3.1 rebounds and 4.8 assists in 32.5 minutes per contest.

Kings coach says Nik Stauskas and Ben McLemore can play together

Michigan v Kansas

The Kings can’t stop drafting shooting guards in the lottery.

In 2013, they took  Ben McLemore at No. 7. A year later, they added Nik Stauskas at No. 8.

In the lottery era, I count just just nine other teams that drafted players of the same position with top-eight picks in back-to-back years (omitting cases where players regularly handled multiple positions):

  • Chicago Bulls in 2002 and 2003 – Jay Williams and Kirk Hinrich
  • Cleveland Cavaliers in 2000 and 2001 – Chris Mihm and DeSagana Diop
  • Vancouver Grizzlies in 1997 and 1998 – Antonio Daniels and Mike Bibby
  • Denver Nuggets in 1997 and 1998 – Tony Battie and Raef LaFrentz
  • Milwaukee Bucks in 1995 and 1996 – Shawn Respert and Ray Allen
  • Philadelphia 76ers in 1993 and 1994 – Shawn Bradley and Sharone Wright
  • Dallas Mavericks in 1992 and 1993 – Jim Jackson and Jamal Mashburn
  • Minnesota Timberwolves in 1990 and 1991 – Felton Spencer and Luc Longley
  • Phoenix Suns in 1987 and 1988 Armen Gilliam and Tim Perry

Only one pair remained teammates even three full seasons – Jackson and Mashburn, whom the Mavericks both traded the following year. In their three-plus seasons together in Dallas, the team went 13-69, 36-46, 26-56 and 24-58.

On average, the listed players lasted together less than a year a half.

But not only do the Kings believe there’s room for both Stauskas and McLemore on the roster, they think there’s room for both on the court.

Sacramento coach Michael Malone, via Steven Wilson of Kings.com:

“What I’ve seen is that Ben and Nik can play together without any problems,” stated Head Coach Micahel Malone during the team’s mini-camp practices in Las Vegas this summer. “They both have a pretty good understanding of the game and they play well off of each other. When you have two guys who have the potential to shoot as well as they do, it’s going to pose problems for other teams.”

It’s not clear whether Malone plans to play Stauskas and McLemore together in the backcourt or use them as the two and three in a three-guard lineup with a true point guard like Darren Collison or Ray McCallum.

Stauskas showed he can be the lead ball-handler, run the pick-and-roll and distribute – in college. I’m not sure he’s ready to handle that role in the NBA.

A three-guard lineup would also allow Rudy Gay, who has found success in Sacramento as a small-ball four, to stay at power forward. But that grouping, even with DeMarcus Cousins at center, would be pretty small.

Really, I find it tough to see Stauskas and McLemore sharing many minutes.

However, I don’t think taking back-to-back shooting guards in itself was a mistake for the Kings. This just increases their chances of finding one who can start there long term. Even though there’s plenty of time to get on track, McLemore’s disappointing rookie year didn’t warrant Sacramento passing on the player it considered best available.

The draft is a big enough crapshoot that putting all your eggs in one basket is usually foolish. Maybe Stauskas or McLemore will pan out – but just don’t count on it happening harmoniously.

Pacers could fall hard and fast

Lance Stephenson, Paul George

The Indiana Pacers just a lot of stability at a time teams need it most.

When they’re good.

The fact got lost during a late-season collapse and near 1-8 playoffs upset, but the Pacers had a darn good year. They finished 56-26, the East’s best record, and reached their second straight conference Finals.

Most winning teams try to keep that good thing going.

By their own volition and bad fortune, the Pacers can’t – at least not as it was constructed last season. Their minutes leader, Paul George, is out for the season with a horrific leg injury. Lance Stephenson, No. 2 in minutes, signed with the Hornets.

No other team projects to go all season without its two minutes leaders from last year, though that could obviously change before the season begins.

From 2012-13 to 2013-14, four teams lost their two minutes leaders:

  • Dallas Mavericks (O.J. Mayo and Darren Collison)
  • Milwaukee Bucks (Monta Ellis and Brandon Jennings)
  • Minnesota Timberwolves (Luke Ridnour and Andrei Kirilenko)
  • Utah Jazz (Al Jefferson and Paul Millsap)

None of the four made the playoffs won a playoff game in 2012-13, making their willingness to turn over understandable.

But the Pacers are headed into this big change at the top after a strong season – and that hasn’t gone well historically.

Since the NBA-ABA merger, just three teams have reached the conference finals and then lost its two minutes leaders before the next season:

  • 2004 Los Angeles Lakers (Gary Payton and Shaquille O’Neal)
  • 1999 Chicago Bulls (Michael Jordan and Dennis Rodman)
  • 1980 Seattle SuperSonics (Gus Williams and Dennis Johnson)

None of the three even made the playoffs the following season

Earlier today, Kurt wrote a good article about the challenges the Pacers will face on the court this season. A significantly larger role for Roy Hibbert isn’t exactly inspiring, and it’s unclear how much of a burden David West and George Hill can carry at this point.

The present for a team like Indiana is troublesome.

So is the history.

Isaiah Thomas: “I always will love Sacramento, but when we play them I’m going to kill Sacramento”

Sacramento Kings v Golden State Warriors

Isaiah Thomas was and is beloved by fans in Sacramento. With good reason — he was the ultimate underdog, a guy we can all relate to. He was the last guy taken in the draft (60th pick, last in the second round) and is 5’9” in a league full of guys who won the genetic lottery. He played hard and fast every time on the court. He was the guy you saw on ads during timeouts in Kings games pitching Pizza Guy. And he got buckets — he averaged 20.7 points a game last season. Every time the Kings brought in a guy to take over the starting point guard spot he just beat them out.

But Thomas was never a management favorite in Sacramento.

The Kings went out this summer and brought in Daren Collison and Thomas told Sactown Royalty he felt disrespected when that happened and he knew his stay in California’s capital was over.

“When they did that, I knew I wasn’t coming back. Going into my fourth year, I felt like I kind of proved myself to be a starter, especially on the Sacramento Kings…

“So when I say I felt disrespected, I just felt like the way I played the game of basketball wasn’t appreciated. So they always say you don’t know what you got until it’s gone, and I feel like that’s going to happen.”

Thomas makes it clear that coach Mike Malone was great and was a big supporter of his, but it was up the ladder of management that there was no love. That matches the buzz I heard, that this was really out of GM Pete D’Alessandro’s office, but he denies that.

Whatever is the case, Thomas said he loved Sacramento but he’s going to make them pay for letting him go.

I tell everybody I love Sacramento, I always will love Sacramento, but when we play them I’m going to kill Sacramento.

Darren Collison can’t guard Thomas. And whenever Thomas has put his mind to something in the NBA, he’s done it.

Now his mind is set on destroying the Kings when they play. Mark that on your calendar.