Tag: D’Antoni system

BBVA Rising Stars Challenge

Jeremy Lin talks D’Antoni system, overcoming bias


The Mavericks’ Jason Terry said what a number of people — a decreasing number every day, but they are out there — have said about Jeremy Lin:

He is a system guy. Mike D’Antoni’s offensive system is designed to give the point guard numbers, and Lin is a product of it more than anything else.

“I know there’s a theory that it’s just a perfect system for me and so – I agree, it’s a perfect system for me,” Lin said before the BBVA Rising Stars Challenge, part of the Friday night festivities of All-Star Weekend. “And I’m truly thankful that I play for Coach D’Antoni because he really is an offensive genius, the way he designed the system. So it’s very suitable for me, and I mean, I guess somewhere down the road if I play in another system, we’ll be able to answer better that question of can I play in another system. But right now I’m just focused on where I’m at.”

Unless you are a talent like LeBron James or Derrick Rose, the system you play in matters a lot — does it ask you to play to your strengths. Lin is a perfect fit for the pick-and-roll heavy Knicks.

But nobody has taken advantage of a system and an opportunity like Lin.

He also was asked about if there was a bias against him — he got no college scholarship offers out of high school, he was undrafted — because he is Asian-American.

“I think it has something to do with it,” Lin said. “I don’t know how much…. I know a lot of people say I’m deceptively athletic and deceptively quick, and I’m not sure what’s deceptive about it. But it could be the fact I’m Asian-American.

“But I think that’s fine. It’s something that I embrace, and it gives me a chip on my shoulder. But I’m very proud to be Asian-American, and I love it.”

By the way, the Knicks’ Iman Shumpert getting hurt and having to pull out of the Sprite Slam Dunk Contest cost us a show. Remember, when Lin first came to the Knicks and was not sure if he would stick, he slept on teammate Landry Fields’ couch for a while.

“We actually had a sweet idea,” Lin said. “ Iman came up (with it). Landry was going to roll out a couch with a cover over it, and was going to be sleeping underneath it, and then we were going to pull the cover, I was going to throw to Iman an ally-oop from the couch, and he was going to jump over both me and the couch, windmill it and then sit down and have Landry hand him a Sprite.”

That might have won it.

New York riding the wave of Jeremy Lin… but it will hit shore

Jeremy Lin

You know how you can be working hard on a really hot day, spending hours helping your friend move (including getting that couch up three flights of twisting stairs), and you really could go for a beer. When it’s all done, someone hands you a cold Bud Light and it tastes like the best beer you’ve ever had?

It’s not. It’s no Stone IPA. Bud Light is barely passable most of the time. But in the right place at the right time it seems heaven sent.

That’s Jeremy Lin in New York right now.

He’s not a great point guard, but he’s the right guy in the right place at the right time.

Lin was a curiosity out of Harvard who caught people’s eye at Summer League two years ago for the same reasons he is succeeding in New York — he plays well off the pick and roll and attacks the paint with a vengance. He makes smart plays and is crafty getting to the hoop, and he can hit open teammates when the defense comes at him. This season he generates 43.7 percent of his offense as the pick-and-roll ball handler and shoots 60 percent in that role (via mysynergysports.com).

The Knicks haven’t had anything like this since the ‘Melo trade, and suddenly Mike D’Antoni’s offense looks like that thing we remember from Phoenix. The pace is being pushed, guys are getting dunks at the rim and wide-open threes. There is spacing and ball movement again.

And Lin gets all the credit for it. He deserves it, he has given the team energy.

We all know this isn’t going to last. Right? Zach Lowe talks about it at Sports Illustrated, too. There are reasons the Warriors and Rockets didn’t give him this kind of run. (Come on New York, deep down you know it, too.) First, it’s a small sample size of success. The fact Lin turns the ball over on 28 percent of the plays where he is the pick-and-roll ball handler hasn’t caught up with him yet. He has played against teams that struggle against the pick-and-roll defensively so far. Also, eventually Carmelo Anthony and Amare Stoudemire will come back and take the ball and shots.

But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a place for Lin in New York. He may not be the long-term answer, but he can be an answer. His style of play coming off the bench with some shooters around him could give the Knicks a formidable and fun second unit. He should stick for a while — so get the guy a place to live.

And right now — with Stoudemire and Anthony out a few more games — it’s going to be fun to watch him go against John Wall Wednesday then make Derek Fisher look slow and old on Friday.

New York should keep riding the Lin wave. Just know that eventually it will get to shore.

Knicks start season in Toronto, and Azubuike may start there, too


azubuike_dunk.jpgYour new-look New York Knicks — now with a real point guard! — will begin their season on the road in Toronto Oct. 27.

The first game at Madison Square Garden will be a good one with Portland in town Oct. 30, according to Frank Isola of the New York Daily News. As for the other big games: New York will host Chicago on Christmas Day and the Miami Heat and LeBron James will get booed by Knicks fans on Dec. 17 and Jan. 27.

It should be an interesting season for the Knicks, who now have players much better suited to running Mike D’Antoni’s system. Amare Stoudemire is a legitimate star and one we know thrives in this system. Raymond Felton is a huge upgrade at the point for New York.

And while the Knicks bring back the hustling Wilson Chandler at the two, don’t be surprised if their fans fall in love with Kelenna Azubuike. As the brilliant Tom Haberstroh (of Hoopdata as well) points out in a piece at ESPNNewYork.com, Azubuike could start over Chandler once he fully gets over his knee injury from last season.


Simply put, Azubuike can shoot and Chandler can’t.  Azubuike boasts a career .409 3-point percentage in his four seasons in the league, giving the Knicks a far superior spot-up weapon on the perimeter than Chandler who had a miserable shooting campaign last season. Among qualified wing players, Chandler shot a league-worst 28.1% on his 89 open catch-and-shoot jump shots last season according to video data from Synergy Sports Technology (the average shooter posts about 42% in such situations).

In the D’Antoni system, spot up shooters are of high value. (See: Johnson, Joe.) Chandler is much more smooth off the dribble but that is not called for as much in the offense.

And when Azubuike starts draining open jumpers because the defense collapsed in to slow Felton and Stoudemire, Knicks fans will love him. Then overrate him. Then try to tear him down. Then doggedly defend him if people not from New York try to tear him down.

You know, the usual New York Star treatment.