Tag: Danny Ainge

Mavericks guard Kidd watches from the bench against the Spurs  during their NBA basketball game in Dallas, Texas

Jason Kidd would like to be a general manager when he retires


Jason Kidd is not ready to retire after this season.

He will be 40 next season but has played solidly this season — 5.9 points and 5.2 assists per game with a PER of 12.4. He might be reduced to being a backup — especially if he returns to Dallas and they fulfill their goal of landing Deron Williams — but he is not ready to hang them up.

But when he does, he has a plan — he wants to be a general manager. He wants to go from organizing a team on the court to organizing the team from off it.

Here’s his quote, from Alex Kennedy at Hoopsworld (via SLAM).

“I would like to go upstairs,” Kidd said. “I’d like to be the person who puts all of the pieces together. We’ll see if that works out.”

It’s a tough transition to make — just because a guy has the athleticism and is considered a smart player doesn’t mean he really is good at player evaluations. Most of the time when you hear a player suggest a trade, it’s a bad idea. It also tends to go the better the player the worse they are at it. Plus, for modern players being a front office guy is a lot of long hours for a whole lot less money than they were just making.

But there have been and still are exceptions — Jerry West, Danny Ainge, Pat Riley, John Paxson, and Mitch Kupchak, just to name a few.

Jason Kidd maybe can be one of those exceptions. He certainly is a cerebral player. And he’ll get a chance (maybe in Dallas), someone will give him a shot.

The Celtics are really committed to telling you everything’s fine

Rajon Rondo

The Celtics have been in trade rumors, progressively more and more as the weeks have gone on and finally on Friday, they snapped a little bit and went on a media binge to try and quell talks about Rarjon Rondo. Danny Ainge essentially went on every outlet in the Boston area and blasted the idea. And the Boston Herald followed up with Rondo about it.

“I’m doing all right,’’ Rondo said. “Like they say, it’s part of the business. I’m happy just playing basketball. I’m happy with the guys they have surrounded me with, the coaching staff. Other than that, when I’m on the court I’m just focused on winning and just having fun while I’m doing it.’’

Rivers and Rondo have both acknowledged past troubles with their relationship, but said it is vastly improved.

“It’s good to hear [positive words] come from the head coach, but some great opportunity might come out and [a trade] may happen, but you never know,’’ Rondo said. “Obviously, that was big of Doc to come out with that statement. That meant a lot to me, but I know the relationship we have.

via Rajon Rondo, Celtics move on from trade rumors – The Boston Globe.

Doc Rivers, also pretty mad.

“I don’t mind any rumors that are true,’’ he said. “I do get upset when it’s not true or in my opinion sometimes news is created and then people report on the news that they created. And when that happens, I’m not real happy with it.

“So in this case and in the [Pau] Gasol case, that’s two already, I haven’t been real happy with it because there’s no truth to that.

“The Gasol rumor was even crazier. That was just ridiculous. I don’t know where it came from. When that kind of stuff happens, it bothers you because it’s being created by somebody outside of your touch and you can’t do anything about it.’

via Rajon Rondo, Celtics move on from trade rumors – The Boston Globe.

The problem is that teams assert these rumors come out of nowhere. Which it’s easy to say. “A reporter completely made this up.”

So to bear that out, a reporter for a major media outlet decided that the best thing to do would be to fabricate a trade rumor which will die in 24 hours, risking killing his or her own career in order to generate page views for less than 24 hours and losing their job. That makes sense.

The Celtics are clearly shopping everyone. That’s the plan. They’re not aggressively calling trying to dump players. But they’re open to talks and will continue to talk with teams about what they can do. Things can be great with Rondo. The talk won’t end until March 15th.

The trade deadline is 12 days away.

Celtics President Ainge says he anticipates Rondo “being here for a long time”

Rajon Rondo

The Rajon Rondo trade rumors have started up again, but Celtics President Danny Ainge is doing his best to downplay them. The Boston Herald has the report:

Danny Ainge, despite another wave of Rajon Rondo trade speculation, said this afternoon that he expects the all-star point guard to still be a Celtic following the March 15 trade deadline.

You never say never where Ainge’s willingness to make the right trade is concerned – especially in the case of a valuable asset like Rondo – but he is downplaying that possibility now.

“I anticipate him being here for a long time,” the Celtics president said when asked about Rondo’s immediate future.

Ainge went on to say that Rondo and Doc Rivers’ relationship is better now than it has ever been, and that the last time he was actively engaged in a trade rumor that involved Rondo was when Chris Paul may have been available last summer.

The 26-year old Rondo is around a decade than Boston’s “Big Three,” and it’s natural to assume that the Celtics’ post “Big Three” team will be built around Rondo, but the All-Star point guard’s play and behavior have been somewhat erratic this season. In any case, Ainge says he “doesn’t anticipate anything happening” with Rondo right now — we’ll see if that holds true over the next two weeks.

Danny Ainge is still waiting for the Celtics’ identity to emerge

Boston Celtics' Pierce and Garnett react when the team was called for a technical foul against the Chicago Bulls during NBA basketball game in Chicago

This we know of the 2011-2012 Boston Celtics: They’re inconsistent as hell, and “inconsistent as hell,” doesn’t quite work against the likes of the Miami Heat and Chicago Bulls. Boston has a long way to go before their championship prospects are treated with any kind of legitimacy, and the first step in that process is undoubtedly the establishment of some kind of collective identity. At the moment, it’s impossible for observers to discern exactly who these Celtics are — not because their true nature is disguised in the insanity of a lockout season, but because even the Celtics themselves are figuring out what kind of team they’re capable of becoming.

We know that the Celtics are among the league’s oldest teams. We know that Rajon Rondo’s play can be a bit erratic, that Paul Pierce is doing what he can with a slowed first step, and that Kevin Garnett doesn’t even attempt to take opponents off the dribble anymore. We know that their bench is filled with role players of varying competency, but that the Celtics as a collective unit are a bit lacking in terms of overall talent.

But we’re still determining how all of those interactive factors manifest themselves in a holistic form — how the combination of all that the Celtics are manifests itself on a day-to-day basis. We’re still waiting to see the best that these Celtics can muster, and Boston general manager Danny Ainge (per WEEI in Boston with Dennis and Callahan and via Sports Radio Interviews) is apparently waiting for that very same thing:

“Well, right now we’re, I don’t even know, we’re a seven or eight seed. That’s who we are. There’s no denying that. Every team has plunges in this sort of crazy season, so that’s who we are right now. But do I think we can be better? Yeah. We haven’t played to our capabilities yet. We haven’t been at full strength. I’m not sure who our team is honestly at this stage. So we’re waiting to see that. But we need to get to the playoffs and find out. But I’m not really afraid of who we play in the first round, or the second round. It’s going to be tough no matter who we play. And I’m not afraid of playing the best teams in the first round.”

Ainge has every reason in the world to insist that his team can play better, but in this case it’s hard to find fault in his general assessment that we haven’t seen the real Celtics just yet. Some may disagree that Boston is better than its current standing, but the flashes of truly effective basketball — which have lasted from a string of plays to entire games this season — hint at a pretty decent team that’s merely struggling to execute. That doesn’t mean that the Celtics will ever figure out a way to stabilize, but the contrast between Boston’s highs and lows has only served to accentuate both poles.

That said, I’d disagree with one particular aspect of Ainge’s assessment: we have seen the Celtics play to their capabilities thus far. It’s just been for short bursts bookended with incompetence, framed in such a way to make it more exception than rule. Boston has been both better and worse than the seventh or eighth seed this season, and though we may spend the entire campaign trying to figure out where the Celtics’ baseline really places them in the context of the Eastern Conference, prolonged inconsistency may speak more to the team’s nature than their peaks and valleys ever could.

Report: Boston’s prepared to “move on” from Big 3

Indiana Pacers v Boston Celtics

Recently Danny Ainge out and out told reporters that he’s willing to hear offers for members of the Big 3. Now comes a report from the New York Daily News that takes it a step further.

But with Paul Pierce dealing with heel issues, Kevin Garnett fading, Ray Allen still effective shooting threes but headed for his 37th birthday and the Celtics 5-8 entering the weekend, the team’s owners gave GM Danny Ainge the official go-ahead to move any member of the troika.

“We’ve got to move on,” said one Celtics official. “Let’s face reality.”

via David Stern defends 66-game NBA season, but it’s hard to argue injuries have hurt product – NY Daily News.

Ownership giving Ainge the ability to fire when ready does change the dynamic. Instead of having to do long-term evaluation of any offer, if Ainge gets what he wants, he can pull the trigger. Furthermore, the quote from the Celts official indicates this isn’t a “trade one of the Big 3 and make one more run while looking to the future” and more of a “ABANDON SHIP, THE S.S. UBUNTU IS GOING DOWN!”

The real question is who wants the Big 3? How motivated can any of them be if they’re not competing directly for a championship? Is Paul Pierce going to be more compelled to get into gameshape for a fringe contender? Is Kevin Garnett going to be able to bring the same intensity at this age, or has he burned the fire out? Do you really want to pay Ray Allen to be a spot-up shooter on the perimeter?

So Ainge will be forced to not only break apart a team that considers itself family, but to try and upsell the players he brought together when they were three of the top fifteen players in the league. If the Celtics want to put it together and make a run, now would be the time.