Tag: Dan Gilbert

LeBron James

LeBron James says he has not reached out to Dan Gilbert


Remember when our Blogger-in-Chief Kurt Helin was like:

LeBron is going to be a member of the Heat for years. He can’t predict what will be happening in his life and the NBA five years from now no more than you or me or anyone else can. So he tried to leave a door open.

Can we move on now?

via LeBron happy in Miami, was “truthful” about Cleveland | ProBasketballTalk.

Yeah, no, we can’t move on, now. After LeBron James said earlier in the week he’d be open to an eventual return to the Cavs, a report surfaced from Yahoo! Sports that James tried contacting Dan Gilbert to try and mend some fences. Later Friday, James shut down that talk on record:

James didn’t deny he was happy to hear potential for a warm reception from the fans who once cheered for him.

He did, however, deny a Yahoo! Sports report earlier in the day that said his camp has reached out to Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert to express interest in someday returning to Cleveland.

“That’s not true,” James said. “Not true at all.”

James deftly avoided two questions about whether he wanted to repair his fractured relationship with Gilbert.

But he did find a way to express his appreciation for the Cleveland fans he still, clearly, wants to win over.

via LeBron James believes fans’ animosity in Cleveland, around NBA is beginning to thaw | cleveland.com.

So now a one-day story is a three-day story and it may go further. Whee! Just when the spotlight had left James for a second with Jeremy Lin, he makes sure to get it back.

If you want to have fun with this story, try and track down the agendas of those involved. Because very side in this has a very specific set of motivations driving it.

So to recap, James would be open to playing for the Cavs again, but has not reached out to Dan Gilbert who has openly bashed him and who James has said he’s not OK with in the past. He’s not going to leave Miami any time soon, but left the door open just in case.

I keep thinking there will eventually be an end to the Decision news cycle. And I’m always wrong. It’s going to exist forever. Even after he retires, we’ll be talking and writing about its effects.


Cavaliers use amnesty clause on Baron Davis

Miami Heat v Cleveland Cavaliers

The Cleveland Cavaliers have officially announced that they have used their team’s “amnesty clause” on Baron Davis, and waived the 32-year old guard from their roster. Davis’ current contract will pay him 13.95 million dollars this season, and Davis has a player option for 14.85 million next season. Davis will still make that money, but his contract will no longer count against Cleveland’s salary cap figures.

Davis, along with what turned out to be the #1 overall pick in the 2011 draft, was traded to the Cavaliers for Mo Williams last season, and the Cavaliers did play significantly better after acquiring Davis. Davis’ three-point shooting was abnormally good in Cleveland — a career 32% three-point shooter, Davis shot 41.4% from deep in his 15 games with the Cavaliers.

That late-season shooting surge will make Davis enticing to a number of top teams who are currently without a great option at point guard, namely the Lakers, Heat, and Knicks. Size, passing ability, and outside shooting ability are what allows guards to play well once they get on the wrong side of 30 — Davis has always been a big guard (and has often shown up to training camps a bit too big), and has always passed well, but he has traditionally made his teams suffer by settling for a lot of outside shots and making very few of them.

If Davis’ 3-point shooting in Cleveland comes with him to his next team, he will help them — if it doesn’t, he could end up throwing away possessions for teams that have some great scorers on their rosters. (If you don’t believe NBA GMs are capable of having short memories when it comes to a player’s ability to shoot the 3, remember how much money Trevor Ariza made after he got hot from deep in the 2009 playoffs.)

Davis would have helped take some pressure off of #1 pick Kyrie Irving if he’d stayed in Cleveland, and Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert has been a very vocal opponent of letting the NBA’s best teams get better at the expense of small-market teams, so I’m inclined to believe that Davis either asked the Cavaliers to let him go or showed up to camp in such iffy shape that the Cavaliers don’t believe he’ll provide much help to whatever contender ultimately signs him. Of course, Davis was making a lot of money and providing relatively little production, so it’s possible that Dan Gilbert and Chris Grant might simply have plans for how to improve the team now that Davis’ contract no longer counts against their salary cap.

Danny Granger and Jason Richardson tweet out their frustration over the league-halted Chris Paul trade

Danny Granger

Over the last few years, Twitter has completely changed the NBA experience. It gives basketball fans a place to congregate online in order to discuss breaking news or thrilling games. It gives reporters a mechanism to get their scoops to readers as quickly as possible, without having to worry about wasting precious moments for the sake of processing and editing. And, most famously: it provides a means of direct communication between the previously distant athlete and the everyman — glimpses into the mind of a professional ballplayer 140 characters at a time.

During the lockout, the league saw what could happen when a few hundred frustrated players took to social media to air their grievances. It was uncoordinated, sometimes ill-informed, and other times embarrassing, but players nonetheless had a digital megaphone with which to broadcast their perspectives directly to the fans. Some NBAers were more successful in that regard than others, but the lack of censorship was refreshing.

Yet even with a new collective bargaining agreement in place — and the NBA back in business as a result — Danny Granger and Jason Richardson have continued tweeting with the same freedom. Both were clearly peeved by the NBA’s decision to nix a potential three-way deal that would have sent Chris Paul to the Lakers on Thursday, and rightfully so. But the manner in which both players lashed out at the league was a bit surprising, even when considering the animosity built up between the players and the NBA over the last few months.

Granger was up first, laying down some pretty heavy snark:

Due to the sabotaging of the LA/NO trade by david stern, and following in the footsteps of my athlete brethern Metta World Peace and Chad Ochocinco, I’m changing my last name to “Stern’s Bi#&h” #effectiveimmediately

Then, following the public release of an email (via Yahoo Sports) from Cavs owner Dan Gilbert that supposedly set the stopping of the trade in action, Jason Richardson offered the following:

Once again Buck Nasty a.k.a Dan Gilbert is letting his wrath being felt by being the main voice in the CP trade block.

Both players disregarded the possibility of a league-issued fine in order to voice their opinions on an incredibly important event. Criticizing Stern, the league, and the owner of another team aren’t commonly considered to be acceptable NBA player behaviors, but the league has made this an extenuating circumstance by intervening in the basketball decisions of individual teams. Odds are that plenty of other players are similarly incensed by Thursday’s events, but it’ll be interesting to see what form that anger takes — in social media or otherwise.

Video: Magic Johnson in cheesy commercial with Dan Gilbert

Dan Gilbert, Earvin Magic Johnson
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In some kind of lockout nightmare by Sterling Cooper Draper Price, Magic Johnson has teamed up with Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert. To shoot smart phones as if they were basketballs. And sell home loans. All done with extra cheese.

It’s all part of a new Quicken Loans ad (that’s the company where Gilbert made enough money to buy the Cavaliers and the Comic Sans font) that is just cheesy and disturbing all at once. So, we bring it to you.

Hat tip to Mark Medina at the Los Angeles Times, who reminds us Magic has a long history of cheesy commercials.

Report: League fines Heat owner $500,000 for tweets

Philadelphia 76ers v Miami Heat

You knew the second you read the tweets from Heat owner Micky Arison Friday that was he going to be forking over a healthy check to the league soon.

Those tweets included his response to one fan who accused Arison of being one of the greedy owners ruining the NBA.

“Honestly u r barking at the wrong owner.”

The price tag for that and his mini twitter rant: $500,000, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo. That was the fine from David Stern.

Want to know how you keep Mark Cuban and Dan Gilbert and other owners willing to speak their mind in line? That’s now. Since day one of the lockout Stern has been walking around threatening a $1 million fine for owners who broke ranks and talked, now he has used that hammer a little and it will have the desired effect.

It might have been a $1 million fine, but Arison insulted Clippers owner Donald Sterling, too, and that brought a smile to Stern’s face.

It’s all worth it to Stern for this reason — he can’t afford to have anything that does not look like a unified front. Keep the players thinking the owners will not back down and you get more, if the cracks show the players will stay more solid.

And while everyone worries about looking unified, the NBA season slips away day by day.