Tag: Dallas Mavericks

New York Knicks v Sacramento Kings

Samuel Dalembert clears waivers, is now an unrestricted free agent


Samuel Dalembert came to the Knicks as part of the trade that sent Tyson Chandler to the Mavericks, but failed to come close to replicating what Chandler was able to provide on the defensive end of the floor.

Combine that with his nonexistent contributions offensively, along with the fact that this has truly become a lost season for the New York franchise, it wasn’t a surprise to see the Knicks waive him after no suitable trade partner could be found.

A team could have claimed him off waivers, but none did — meaning that Dalembert is now an unrestricted free agent.

From Jeff Zillgitt of USA Today:

Center Samuel Dalembert has cleared waivers, I’ve been told, and is free to sign with team of his choice.

Salary won’t be an issue, but teams will need to weigh whether Dalembert can still contribute meaningful minutes, at least on the defensive end of the floor, that are worthy of justifying his place on the roster.

The Cavaliers are one of a few teams that immediately come to mind that need immediate frontcourt help, but given what we’ve seen from Dalembert this season, he’d likely be considered as only a last resort.

Stephen Curry makes 1,000 3-pointers quicker than anyone else. Much quicker

Stephen Curry, Damian Lillard

Stephen Curry could have stopped shooting 3-pointers for more than a full season and still made 1,000 career 3-pointers in fewer games than anyone in NBA history.

Of course, Curry wouldn’t do that.

The Warriors guard became the 74th player to make 1,000 3-pointers, draining four triples in the Warriors win over the Pacers last night. He needed just 369 games to achieve the mark – 88 fewer than second-place Dennis Scott.

Here’s how long it took everyone in the 1,000 3-pointer club:


And despite his early injury troubles, Curry was also the youngest to 1,000 3-pointers:


Player 3s Games to 1,000 3s Age at 1,000 3s
Stephen Curry 1003 369 26-299
Dennis Scott 1214 457 29-076
Ray Allen 2973 473 27-167
Gilbert Arenas 1079 476 28-323
Peja Stojakovic 1760 488 28-145
Mike Miller 1553 527 27-319
Nick Van Exel 1528 534 29-025
Jason Richardson 1577 551 28-001
J.R. Smith 1344 561 27-097
Michael Redd 1045 570 31-218
Ben Gordon 1162 585 29-005
Kyle Korver 1607 585 30-001
Jason Williams 1238 587 31-100
Baron Davis 1332 589 28-334
Jamal Crawford 1765 591 28-360
Wesley Person 1150 595 31-267
Chauncey Billups 1830 598 29-182
Brent Barry 1395 600 32-317
Jason Terry 2009 602 29-121
Tim Hardaway 1542 605 31-213
Glen Rice 1559 606 29-265
Kevin Martin 1043 608 31-043
Paul Pierce 1981 611 29-029
Antoine Walker 1386 615 28-092
Eddie Jones 1546 615 32-025
Rashard Lewis 1787 626 28-098
Reggie Miller 2560 627 29-207
Quentin Richardson 1167 633 29-277
John Starks 1222 642 33-184
Vernon Maxwell 1256 652 31-153
Cuttino Mobley 1085 654 31-218
Mookie Blaylock 1283 654 31-012
Manu Ginobili 1231 657 34-253
Joe Johnson 1645 660 28-196
Stephen Jackson 1252 661 31-338
Vince Carter 1847 670 31-025
Allan Houston 1305 682 30-354
Damon Stoudamire 1236 691 31-151
Kirk Hinrich 1123 693 32-103
Dan Majerle 1360 698 32-170
Morris Peterson 1009 701 32-217
Mitch Richmond 1326 702 32-162
Mike Bibby 1517 706 29-306
Steve Nash 1685 734 32-334
Dana Barros 1090 736 32-312
Nick Anderson 1055 745 32-040
Steve Smith 1148 746 32-330
Dirk Nowitzki 1513 746 29-269
Hersey Hawkins 1226 747 31-062
LeBron James 1184 749 28-068
Tracy McGrady 1081 766 29-203
Mike Dunleavy 1165 769 33-070
Chuck Person 1220 775 31-261
Lindsey Hunter 1075 781 34-119
Michael Finley 1454 783 32-352
Hedo Turkoglu 1200 784 31-286
Dale Ellis 1719 784 33-225
Shane Battier 1250 794 33-154
Jason Kidd 1988 803 32-259
Latrell Sprewell 1104 810 33-172
Allen Iverson 1059 815 32-286
Kobe Bryant 1688 820 29-143
David Wesley 1123 834 34-138
James Posey 1035 834 33-329
Metta World Peace 1119 844 33-019
Dell Curry 1245 860 34-251
Antawn Jamison 1163 935 35-223
Derek Fisher 1248 996 35-178
Terry Porter 1297 1001 35-005
Rasheed Wallace 1086 1018 35-055
Danny Ainge 1002 1037 36-020
Clifford Robinson 1253 1109 36-340
Gary Payton 1132 1121 36-128
Derek Harper 1070 1125 36-121

Yes, I too was surprised J.R. Smith previously held the record for youngest player to make 1,000 3-pointers. (Smith has surprised me quite a bit lately.)

In no uncertain terms: Curry blew the competition out of the water.

I’ve long believed Curry will retire as the greatest 3-point shooter of all-time, and obviously him breaking these records reinforces that belief. But he has strong competition sooner than I ever imagined.

Damian Lillard (red) has made 500 3-pointers in 199 games, putting him ahead of Curry (blue) at the same point:


Even by age, despite Curry entering the league younger, Lillard has passed the Warriors guard:


Lillard (2.5 3-pointers per game in his career) trails Curry’s overall pace (2.7), and Curry deserves credit for improving even after his fast start. But it’s also possible Lillard makes similar improvements.

Of course, volume isn’t the only factor in determining the best 3-point shooter. Curry has a healthy lead in career percentage (43.5 to 38.3), and that’s a big reason I remain confident in my Curry prediction.

Still, if we’re going to discuss how Curry smoked the field in games to 1,000 pointers, it’s worth noting Lillard could get there even more quickly.

Kyrie Irving falls to fourth among Eastern Conference guards in All-Star voting, stands to lose about $9 million

LeBron James

The NBA has released its third batch of All-Star voting results (see the first and second):

Eastern Conference


1. LeBron James (Cle) 971,299

2. Pau Gasol (Chi) 527,582

3. Carmelo Anthony (NY) 456,186

4. Chris Bosh (Mia) 354,609

5. Kevin Love (Cle) 260,269

6. Marcin Gortat (Was) 155,636

7. Joakim Noah (Chi) 139,307

8. Jonas Valanciunas (Tor) 125,796

9. Al Jefferson (Cha) 77,518

10. Kevin Garnett (BKN) 76,595

11. Nikola Vucevic (Orl) 68,722

12. Paul Pierce (Was) 59,264

13. Paul Millsap (Atl) 55,224

14. Nikola Mirotic (Chi) 52,562

15. Al Horford (Atl) 48,465


1. John Wall (Was) 564,977

2. Dwyane Wade (Mia) 507,326

3. Kyle Lowry (Tor) 406,974

4. Kyrie Irving (Cle) 372, 065

5. Jimmy Butler (Chi) 263,914

6. Derrick Rose (Chi) 240,092

7. DeMar DeRozan (Tor) 97,093

8. Louis Williams (Tor) 43,652

9. Giannis Antetokounmpo (Mil) 31,700

10. Bradley Beal (Was) 28,387

Western Conference


1. Anthony Davis (NO) 922,381

2. Blake Griffin (LAC) 490,786

3. Marc Gasol (Mem) 476,660

4. Tim Duncan (SA) 374,814

5. Kevin Durant (OKC) 330,297

6. LaMarcus Aldridge (Por) 315,405

7. Dwight Howard (Hou) 211,531

8. DeMarcus Cousins (Sac) 209,742

9. Dirk Nowitzki (Dal) 186,017

10. Kawhi Leonard (SA) 115,194

11. Rudy Gay (Sac) 97,856

12. DeAndre Jordan (LAC) 75,777

13. Tyson Chandler (Dal) 63,906

14. Nick Young (LAL) 62,502

15. Serge Ibaka (OKC) 60,842


1. Stephen Curry (GS) 958,014

2. Kobe Bryant (LAL) 862,568

3. James Harden (Hou) 690,843

4. Chris Paul (LAC) 401,945

5. Damian Lillard (Por) 210,794

6. Klay Thompson (GS) 170,827

7. Rajon Rondo (Dal) 165,427

8. Russell Westbrook (OKC) 159,264

9. Jeremy Lin (LAL) 148,763

10. Tony Parker (SA) 75,325

A few observations:

Why J.R. Smith is not the totally selfish player you think he is

Philadelphia 76ers v New York Knicks

The Cavaliers had their back against the wall.

A day after losing its Christmas Day game to the Heat, Cleveland trailed the lowly Magic by four. Victor Oladipo had just made a free throw with 0.6 seconds remaining in the third quarter.

As the Cavaliers took the ball out of bounds, they surely realized they – by rule – had enough time left to catch and shoot. Cutting into Orlando’s lead on that final possession would be difficult, but it was at least possible.

Shawn Marion took ball out.

Mike Miller ran up court and left view at a pretty fast pace. Even if he were trying to get open, a long pass would have been risky. If the went ball out of bounds without being touched, Orlando would have gotten possession where the pass was thrown – right under Cleveland’s own basket. If the Magic had lost track of him, maybe it’s worth attempting the long pass. They didn’t, but at least he took a defender with him.

Marion first looked to Kevin Love, who barely moved from his rebounding position and puts up his hands as if to say, “Don’t pass to me.”

Meanwhile, Dion Waiters, bit further upcourt, pointed to Matthew Dellavedova and then slowly walked towards Cleveland’s bench.

Marion passed to Dellavedova, who showed no urgency and took one dribble to ensure time ran out.

Magic 75, Cavaliers 71. End of third quarter.

“I think it’s a dumb play, but that’s just me,” J.R. Smith, who was traded from the Knicks to Cleveland this week, said earlier this season when asked more generally about teams intentionally running out the clock to end quarters rather than attempting desperation heaves. “And I thank them for it, because if it would have went in, it would have hurt us.”

It’s quite common for players to pass on those low-percentage end-of-quarter heaves, and nobody batted at an eye when the Cavaliers did it.

Kevin Durant admitted there are situations he’d hold the ball rather than risk lowering his shooting percentage. Shane Battier said it’s not worth the hit on individual stats. And those are two of the NBA’s most respected players in recent years.

But Smith – who’s (mostly fairly) known for his bad habits – is unafraid to take those shots.

“I just do it because I think it’s the right play to make instead of just dribbling the clock out and being selfish,” Smith said. “…It can be an advantage for our team. I’ve never been one to worry about my shooting percentage.”

Who knows whether Smith’s intentions are truly altruistic? Maybe he just cares about his scoring average more than his field-goal percentage. Or maybe he (like so many NBA players) loves the thrill of attempting shots from halfcourt, so much so that he (unlike so many NBA players) takes them over protecting his field-goal percentage.

But those attempts are inarguably good for his team. In a sport where only points scored and allowed – not field-goal percentage – count toward the final won-loss verdict, the only downside to attempting them is on a player’s individual stats.

And Smith takes them without apology.

There’s no feasible way to count how players handle the end of every first, second and third quarter in every game. But I use attempts from at least 40 feet as a reasonable substitute.

Since Smith went to the Nuggets in 2006-07, he has take more such shots (73) than anyone in the league during that span. He just hasn’t made a single one.

Here’s the leaderboard for that time period on shots from at least 40 feet:

Player FG FGA
J.R. Smith 0 73
Andre Miller 1 69
Jamal Crawford 3 60
Steve Blake 1 57
Raymond Felton 3 56
Andre Iguodala 3 50
Corey Brewer 2 44
Aaron Brooks 1 43
Kyle Lowry 1 42
Derrick Rose 1 41
LeBron James 2 41
Monta Ellis 2 40
Rudy Gay 1 39
Devin Harris 1 38
Jarrett Jack 2 38
Caron Butler 1 37
Carmelo Anthony 1 37
D.J. Augustin 1 37
Joe Johnson 1 37
Mo Williams 1 36
Zach Randolph 4 35
Beno Udrih 0 35
Nate Robinson 2 35
Deron Williams 2 34
Tyreke Evans 4 34

You might be thinking Smith’s numbers are skewed, because he jacks up long shots during typical possessions. But I watched all 32 of Smith’s shots from at least 40 feet the last four years, which were available through NBA.com’s media site. Of the 32, 30 were the type of shots – a heave to end the first, second or third quarter – I’m discussing here. One exception was a desperation attempt to the end a fourth quarter, and the other came as the shot clock was expiring after a pass had been deflected into the backcourt.

Smith’s 40-foot attempts are not inflated by his penchant for jacking well beyond the 3-point arc whenever he pleases, though he says that trait helps on his heaves.

“You really get a sense for how far the basket is and what shot to shoot in that situation,” Smith said.

He practices the long shots frequently, and he knows exactly how he wants to attempt them depending where he is on the floor:

  • Halfcourt or near it: regular jumper
  • About three-quarter court: pushing ball from closer to his chest
  • Further back: baseball throw

One tactic many players take in those end-of-quarter situations is shooting with their best form no matter how much time is left. It seems that’s the internal compromise they make. If their best form means they don’t get off the attempt before the buzzer, they’re fine with that. But if they can use their natural motion and still get the shot off, that’s an attempt they’re willing to live with.

Smith – who is skilled at quickly releasing the ball when necessary – sees that trick and all the others, and like he said, he appreciates the opponent passing on those shots. But when a teammate declines the attempt?

“I get mad, because I’m like, ‘Y’all should have gave it to me. I would have at least tried to make it,’” Smith said.

Trying to make it is one – admirable – thing, but actually making it is another story. Despite all his attempts, Smith has never made a shot from beyond 40 feet, though he has had plenty of close calls.

Smith called his favorite desperation attempt a rushed 3-pointer to end the first quarter in Game 2 of the Knicks’ 2013 first-round playoff series against the Celtics:

That shot went in the books as a 36-footer, exposing a flaw in my methodology. That attempt probably belongs in this count, but there’s no feasible way to review all those slightly closer looks. Forty feet ensures nearly every shot is an end-of-quarter heave, and the evidence is conclusive enough that Smith is willing to take those shots.

What’s a little less clear is how that affects him.

Smith has battled injury this season and taken just two shots from at least 40 feet, but last year he led the NBA with 14 such shots. That season, he shot 39.4 percent on 3-pointers. Remove the 40-plus footers, and his 3-point percentage jumps to 40.6 percent. Those 1.2 percentage points aren’t a huge difference, but they at least slightly alter perception of Smith, especially because they drop him below the 40 percent bar from beyond the arc.

Is he worried that will affect him in contract negotiations if executives don’t realize why his shooting percentage is lower?

“I haven’t really thought about it like that,” said Smith, who has a player option for next season. “Actually, I think it’s a good thing. I think they should know my worth from the way I play and how I play. So, I don’t think shooting percentage should come into it.”

The Cavaliers, for contractual reasons or any other, obviously disagreed during that Dec. 26 game against the Magic.

Cleveland still won that game behind 15 fourth-quarter points from LeBron James, who was not on the court to end the third quarter. In many ways, that exemplifies who the Cavaliers have been this season – structurally unsound but usually talented enough to win anyway.

At this point, everyone believes they understand what J.R. Smith adds to the equation, and it’s no surprise when he says, “I feel as though there’s not a shot I can’t make.”

But maybe that’s just the team-first attitude the Cavaliers need.

Report: Who might the Knicks try and trade next? Jose Calderon.

Toronto Raptors vs New York Knicks

Phil Jackson has waived the white flag.

It was pretty obvious before Monday night’s big three-team trade that the Knicks were in tanking mode — despite their string of losses they have been encouraging Carmelo Anthony to take time off to rest his sore knee. As much time as he wants. The rest of the season if he wants.

But Monday’s trade — sending out J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert in a clear salary dump — made it obvious the Knicks are going to clear the decks of as much salary as they can while hoping to push their first round pick this season (which they still have the rights to) as far up the lottery scale as possible.

So who else could be next out the door in New York? Try Jose Calderon. That according to Ken Berger at CBSSports.com.

With the Knicks now owners of the worst record and perhaps worst roster in the league as Phil Jackson hits the reset button in New York, league sources say the next player on the move could be point guard Jose Calderon. But at age 33 with two years and more than $15 million left on his contract, that will be a difficult proposition. Calderon came to the Knicks in the trade that sent Tyson Chandler and Raymond Felton to Dallas….

The Knicks are expected to try to re-engage the Thunder in talks for point guard Reggie Jackson after being rebuffed in their efforts to land him in Monday night’s three-team deal, sources say. Jackson would fit into the $2.6 million trade exception New York received in the trade with Cleveland and Oklahoma City, but the Thunder have been steadfast in rebuffing trade offers for the point guard.

The Thunder think they have a legit shot at a title run this season — because they do. This team made the conference finals last season and played the Spurs at least even once Serge Ibaka was healthy. But to make that run again they need scoring beyond Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook, and that right now is Reggie Jackson. There is little chance the Thunder will decide to move Jackson now, bringing in Dion Waiters and going over the luxury tax line is a sign the Thunder are serious about a run. (They hope Waiters can be a big points contributor as well, but that remains to be seen.)

Calderon has struggled this season. He is shooting the three well, 42.5 percent, but is struggling to finish at the rim or knock down shots inside the arc, plus his assists are down and his turnovers are up. The question is how much of that is age and a natural decline, and how much of that is being on the Knicks with this roster. The challenge for the Knicks are a lot of the league’s best teams are set at point gourd and aren’t likely to take on the risk.

But Phil Jackson will try.