Tag: Daequan Cook

Nate Robinson

Nate Robinson comes up big once again in Bulls’ Game 1 over Heat


Nate Robinson’s teammates hunched over just so they could celebrate at eye level with the shortest player the NBA playoffs have seen in the last seven years.

Earlier in the night, they would have had to bend even lower.

In the second quarter, Robinson sat on the Heat court with blood dripping from his face. He had just collided with LeBron James, 11 inches taller and 70 pounds heavier, while going for a loose ball. Robinson left the court, but he returned in the second half.

And despite his 5-foot-9 frame, Robinson came up big. Really big.

Robinson had just waved off a Joakim Noah screen, driven right past Ray Allen and gotten all the way to the rim for a crucial basket. A timeout followed, and his teammates ducked their heads to share the joy with Robinson.

The Bulls ended Game 1 against the Heat on a 10-0 run, the final seven points by Robinson, for a 93-86 win.

Marco Belinelli made the first big shot of the decisive run, a game-tying 3-pointer with 1:59 left. Robinson pulled up for a go-ahead jumper with 1:17 left, drove past Allen with 45 seconds left and then made a few free throws down the stretch.

Undoubtedly, Robinson and Belinelli deserve credit for their big shots, but those attempts were created by Chicago’s one decided advantage in this game: rebounding. The Bulls outrebounded the Heat, 46-32.

Joakim Noah offensively rebounded a Belinelli miss to set up the guard’s 3-pointer, and on the Bulls’ three defensive possessions after their final baskets, Chicago held Miami to a single shot. Belinelli grabbed two defensive rebounds, and Noah grabbed the other.

Noah played 39 minutes and grabbed 11 rebounds, using his mobility to remain effective when the Heat went small and still help the Bulls rebound. In theory, Taj Gibson also has that capability, but he had just four rebounds in 25 minutes. Instead, Jimmy Butler (14 rebounds in 48 minutes), Belinelli (seven rebounds in 46 minutes) and Carlos Boozer (seven rebounds in 25 minutes) stepped up on the glass.

One of Chicago’s biggest relative downfalls tonight was its backup guards. With Kirk Hinrich out injured, the Bulls gave Marquise Teague eight minutes and Daequan Cook two, even though those two never stood a chance against Miami’s defense. With Teague on the court, Chicago’s offensive rating was 65.4. With Cook, it was 0.0.

Neither played in the second half, which was a sound adjustment by Tom Thibodeau after neither team scored well during a mostly tight first half.

LeBron had just two points on 1-of-6 shooting at halftime, and the open looks he created for his teammates didn’t fall.

As had happened multiple times in their first-round sweep of the Bucks after back-and-forth play, the Heat made a run in the third quarter.

Dwyane Wade dunked. Chris Bosh blocked a shot. Wade made a layup over Noah by seemingly pausing at the peak of his jump and twisting around Noah as the Bulls center was bound by laws of gravity and retuned to Earth. The Heat defense swarmed the Bulls into a bad shot and a miss. Bosh made a corner 3-pointer from LeBron. Bosh stole a pass. LeBron threw a bullet pass to Wade for another layup.

It was a 9-0 run, and even though no timeout was called, the Miami crowd roared while players on the Heat bench stood. Against Milwaukee, this would have been the decisive stretch.

But the Heat led by six measly points. Fewer than two-and-a-half minutes later, they led by only one.

They can’t make only one burst and expect to beat Chicago, which plays hard all game long. The Heat, whose 27-game win streak ended against the Bulls, know this, but sustaining quality play after such a long layoff is easier said than done.

It’s reasonable to expect Miami will be sharper in Game 2, but the Bulls aren’t backing down, and Robinson is stepping up.

Joakim Noah leads Bulls to Game 7 win over Nets


Immediately after the final buzzer sounded in the Bulls 99-93 Game 7 win over the Nets on Saturday, Joakim Noah walked toward center court, screaming with excitement and popping his road red Bulls jersey.

He had every right to do so, considering his inspired performance was the main reason behind his team’s victory — one that will send them to Miami for the second round of the playoffs against the defending champion Heat.

Noah finished with 24 points, 14 rebounds, and six blocked shots in 41 minutes of action, and was the catalyst for the Bulls in bringing the energy from the very start. He opened the game with 10 points and five rebounds — all offensive — in the first 12 minutes, and instilled the belief in his teammates that, despite being undermanned with key players out due to injury, that they might still have enough on this night to survive and advance.

Luol Deng and Kirk Hinrich were both out for the Bulls — Deng was hospitalized after suffering complications from a spinal tap he received days earlier, and Hinrich tried to go in warmups, but his calf injury was too severe for him to feel like he could have contributed anything at all to his team’s effort.

The second quarter for Chicago was where the damage was done, and even seldom-used players off the bench that were pressed into action were able to contribute in temporarily blowing the game open in the Bulls’ favor. Marquis Teague, Nazr Mohammed, and Daequan Cook all hit shots in the period, one in which Chicago shot almost 62 percent from the field, while getting out to a lead of 17 points by the end of the first half.

Brooklyn finally brought the energy a Game 7 should require in the third quarter, and shaved 10 points off of the halftime lead before the period was through. Gerald Wallace was key for the Nets during that stretch, scoring 11 of his 19 points, while knocking down three shots from three-point distance.

The Nets were able to get as close as five late in the game, but the Bulls seemed to answer every single time they got close. Marco Belinelli scored on a layup with the shot clock winding down on a possession with about two minutes remaining to push the lead back to seven, and finished the Bulls scoring for the game by converting four free throws down the stretch to seal it.

Joe Johnson was playing through injury for the Nets, and said a couple of days earlier that he was essentially a decoy on the court while playing on one leg. He gave it a go in this one, but his shot was nowhere near what he’s capable of, and his inability to hit open looks hurt the Nets more than his presence helped. Johnson finished just 2-of-14 from the field in 38 minutes, including just 1-of-9 from three-point distance.

It really was an incredible accomplishment by these Bulls to overcome the loss of so many key players to win a playoff series on the road like this. Things get immediately and exponentially more difficult beginning on Monday in Miami, but for now, Tom Thibodeau and the healthy Bulls that stepped up deserve all the credit in the world for their Game 7 performance.

Why is Chicago slumping? Go back to this summer’s moves.

Tom Thibodeau, Jimmy Butler, Joakim Noah, Taj Gibson

The Chicago Bulls are in a slump. They have lost 7-of-10 and are 6-9 in their last 15. Their already weak offense has slipped a little but it is the defense that has taken the bigger step back. They have slid down the ranks in the Eastern conference to the sixth seed, making their road through the playoffs that much harder.

What is going on in the Windy City?

Yes, they still are without Derrick Rose, and that is a blow. But the team that was 24-16 after 40 games didn’t have Rose either. Yes, injuries to guys like Joakim Noah and Taj Gibson are part of it. And sure, the Bulls have shown a lack of focus at times, particularly on the offensive end (where they will struggle regardless with this lineup), but that’s not it either.

No, if you want to know why the Bulls are struggling now you need to look at what they did in July.

The Bulls shipped out veterans to put them on a track for a lot of cap space in 2014 (to go get another star to play next to Rose). Gone are Omer Asik, Ronnie Brewer, Kyle Korver, C.J. Watson and John Lucas. In their place are Marco Belinelli, Nazr Mohammed, Kirk Hinrich, Daequan Cook and Nate Robinson. Those guys simply aren’t as good.

K.C. Johnson broke it down well at the Chicago Tribune.

Really, the numbers most worth comparing between last season’s team and this season’s are these: 37-14 in 2011-12 and 15-17 in 2012-13. Those are the different won-loss records when at least one starter was out for the Bulls. Don’t forget: Rose missed almost a lot of time last season, as he has this one. Still, depth and defense, not to mention the occasional John Lucas III’s heroics, often prevailed.

That difference in winning percentage is .725 and .469, or roughly the disparity of contribution between Omer Asik and Nazr Mohammed. For another comparison, this season’s winning percentage of .561 trails last season’s of .667 from the 27 games Rose missed with injury.

The Bulls were going to take a step back without Rose this season, but the size of the step is dictated in part by the depth of the team. That’s why Reggie Rose’s frustration at the deadline was not out of line with what a lot of Bulls fans were thinking (even if he shouldn’t have opened his mouth).

Tom Thibodeau is keeping up the “we have enough to win” mantra but the fact is he doesn’t, not at the same pace. And that’s coming home to roost as the season wears on.