Cuttino Mobley

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Report: Cuttino Mobley sues Knicks for forcing him to retire

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Cuttino Mobley has not played in the NBA since 2008, but he wants back in. He’s worked out for teams but nothing has come of it.

He retired after being traded to the Knicks (in the Zach Randolph deal) in 2008. In a routine post-trade physical it was discovered Mobley had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the same condition linked to the deaths of Reggie Lewis and Hank Gathers. The Knicks wanted him to walk away from basketball because of it, and Mobley did after an 11 year career.

When he first retired Mobley didn’t complain, in fact he said the MRI “saved his life,” but that tone had changed by last year when Mobley was saying that the Knicks forced this decision on him when he didn’t want it. The Knicks did get relief from the league on Mobley’s $9.5 million salary.

Now he has taken the next step and sued the Knicks, first broken by Howard Beck at the New York Times.

The Knicks responded. Here is Beck on it:

In statement, Knicks say they are “extremely disappointed” in Mobley’s lawsuit and are “confident Cuttino’s claims have no merit”

This was Mobley’s quote last year.

“At first I was cool with it because I didn’t do research on it, but then doing research and getting different opinions, then I became upset because the corporation, the big company trying to get as much money as they can and do different things like that, for me I don’t think that was right,” Mobley said.

“You either waive me, you don’t take me in, you let me go somewhere else, let me create my own destiny like I did in 1999 when I came to the Rockets. Let me create my own decisions. Don’t make the decisions for me, clogging my heads with different things.

“I’m not upset now because I know it’s a business and that’s how they treat it as a business, but it’s two and a half, three years I haven’t played. It’s been a waste.”

Great, now we have another NBA player and issue headed to court. It’s kind of hard for this layman to see how the Knicks are at fault here. Then again, I think if you buy hot coffee in a drive-through and spill it on yourself you can’t sue saying it was hot. I’m crazy that way. Who knows how this really turns out.

Cuttino Mobley helping bring medical marijuana to Maine

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Go ahead and make your “NBA player and pot” jokes, but when you read it you’ll see Cuttino Mobley looks like a pretty smart business man.

In part because there’s a lot of money in medical marijuana — even if it’s supposed to just be non-profit collectives — and he is helping bring it to new markets.

The Portland Press Herald was trying to trace back the money to finance several new pot dispensaries in Maine which has $1.6 million in financing, and the roads led back to Mobley.

The collective, according to documents, is comprised of The Farmacy Institute for Wellness of West Hollywood, Calif., and Cuttino Mobley, a former NBA and Maine Central Institute basketball player…

Northeast says the new money will help it open its first dispensary — in Thomaston — “within weeks.” The outfit holds the exclusive licenses to operate four of eight marijuana dispensaries in Maine, including three of the state’s largest markets: Portland, Bangor and Augusta.

Mobley basically cut the check and gets paid back at 8.5 percent interest plus consultation fees, according to other reports. That’s a good investment if you think the business has something people want to buy. And you know they do.

Mobley left the league with a heart condition and while he has talked of making a comeback that seems a long shot. At best. But it looks like he wouldn’t need to do it for the money.

Cuttino Mobley wants to play again in the NBA

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Cuttino Mobley played 11 serviceable seasons in the NBA with four different teams, but after being traded to the Knicks in 2008 (in the deal that freed New York of the then-horrific contract of Zach Randolph), he was forced to retire due to medical concerns.

Mobley has a serious heart ailment known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is the same condition that was linked to the deaths of Reggie Lewis and Hank Gathers. After undergoing the routine post-trade physical, Mobley was told of the severity of the condition, and decided at the time that it would be in his best interest to end his NBA career.

Times have changed, however, at least in Mobley’s mind. As he told MyFoxHouston.com (via IamaGM), he’d like to play in the league once again. But it’s going to be difficult, because teams are going to be extremely cautious about Mobley, given his diagnosis. He blames the Knicks a little bit for that, but also says that his condition isn’t nearly as severe as it could be, pointing to his lengthy playing career as evidence to support his claim.

Mobley said he is not happy with the way the Knicks handled his situation in 2008.

“At first I was cool with it because I didn’t do research on it, but then doing research and getting different opinions, then I became upset because the corporation, the big company trying to get as much money as they can and do different things like that, for me I don’t think that was right,” Mobley said.

“You either waive me, you don’t take me in, you let me go somewhere else, let me create my own destiny like I did in 1999 when I came to the Rockets. Let me create my own decisions. Don’t make the decisions for me, clogging my heads with different things.

“I’m not upset now because I know it’s a business and that’s how they treat it as a business, but it’s two and a half, three years I haven’t played. It’s been a waste.”

There’s clearly a little bitterness over how things went down with the Knicks, and maybe it’s true that Mobley could have continued to play with no consequences. But three years later, and after making countless millions over an 11-year career, if something serious were to happen to Mobley as a result of his condition during a comeback attempt, then that would be the real waste.

Cuttino Mobley wants back in the act

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When Cuttino Mobley was traded to the Knicks two years ago, a heart irregularity was discovered to have worsened in his physical, forcing doctors to tell him he’d never play again. Now, Mobley is out to show that isn’t the case after two years away from the game.

Yahoo! Sports reports that Mobley is trying to get back in the league, confident that his heart will pass the necessary physicals. He worked out for the Celtics in preseason, and the Mavericks and Bulls have shown interest, according to Yahoo!. But perhaps the most interesting facet of this entire situation is how Mobley describes the doctor visit the Knicks set up which ended his career to begin with. From Yahoo!:

“It kind of shocked me. Instead of months to really think about it, I had a day or two. [The Knicks] said, ‘No you can’t play,’ and they literally took me up to Boston and the Boston doctor said, ‘No, he can’t play.’ I’m like, ‘Wait, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. Listen man, it’s OK.’ He said, ‘No, I’ve seen this.’ He was so adamant about this.

So, wait, hold on. The Knicks’ staff did a quick physical on him, then a specialist in Boston who was adamant denied him, and that was it? No second opinion? No further consultation? Just gone? After everything that’s gone on with the Knicks lately, you have to wonder if this doesn’t sound a little off.

A 6-4 shooting guard with a career 38% three-point percentage? Why isn’t Miami knocking down this guy’s door?

Also working out for the Celtics: Cuttino Mobley, Rashad McCants, and Trenton Hassell

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cuttino_mobley.jpgThe Boston Celtics currently have 17 players on their roster, but that hasn’t stopped them from batting their eyelashes at a handful of available free agent wings. As Kurt mentioned earlier (via Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports), Adam Morrison is among them. He’s the headliner, in a way. As a 26 year-old former No. 3 overall pick and a former NCAA Co-Player of the Year, Morrison has some standout lines on his résumé and plenty of prime years left, even if he hasn’t proven much on the pro level.

Along with Morrison, Boston has brought in the thought-to-be-semi-retired Cuttino Mobley, the out-of-work-but-not-yet-retired Rashad McCants, and the probably-should-be-retired Trenton Hassell. It’s an odd bunch, each with their own quirks and red flags.

Mobley is attempting a comeback to the NBA after spending a season away from the game, which is rarely a promising sign for a 35 year-old wing. Apparently Mobley doesn’t view his potentially career-ending heart condition as quite so career-ending, and should he play his way into roster consideration, it’ll be interesting to see what Boston’s doctors have to say.

Regardless, it’s hard to see what Mobley can offer that the Celtics that they don’t already have. He’s an average three-point shooter that plays the type of defense you’d expect of a player his age at his position. I guess that makes him a fine Michael Finley substitute, but Boston doesn’t really need that.

McCants, too hasn’t played NBA ball since 2009, and his biggest contribution to the league since that time has been a denial by the staffers at last year’s Summer League. McCants can score, though he’s typically given his coaches headaches in his various NBA stops. Part of that stems from McCants’ personality, but I’m sure it has more to do with his reluctance to move the ball and stay focused on defense. NBA franchises seem to think that McCants is more trouble than he’s worth, particularly due to the one-dimensional nature of his game. He’s a scorer (not a particularly efficient one, at that) and nothing else, and teams can generally find such players in spades.

Hassell was once considered a defensive stopper, which was more indicative of his offensive limitations than his defensive prowess. He found ways to earn minutes, I’ll give him that, but Hassell has long benefited from a reputation for playing strong perimeter defense while his on-court product has been a bit less impressive. Hassell can still get the job done in spots, but he isn’t Bruce Bowen. He’s not even Quinton Ross. He’s an aging defender with nothing to contribute on offense.

Due diligence is encouraged, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with Boston bringing in players for workouts or camp. Yet the Celtics are already absurdly deep, and have perfectly capable players deep on their bench. Given Boston’s current roster, the probability of any of these four players making it through training camp is quite slim.