Tag: Corey Maggette

Corey Maggette

Corey Maggette, front office executive? That’s what he wants.


Certain guys you see going through the NBA and you think, “that guy could move into the front office seamlessly. Chauncey Billups is a guy right now that fits that mold and he could get a shot with the Pistons.

Corey Maggette?

He wants it to happen and has taken steps that way, according to an interesting note from Alex Kennedy of Hoopsworld.

Sources close to Maggette say that he briefly considered retiring this summer so that he could attempt to land a job within an NBA front office. He recently took part in the NBPA’s Leadership Development Program, which essentially grooms current players to become executives. However, it’s looking like he’ll play one more season and then attempt to join a front office next offseason.

First off, he wants a one-year minimum deal with a contender. If healthy (he only played 50 games the last two seasons combined) he could give a team some volume scoring and trips to the free throw line. Plus he’d bring some huge biceps to the locker room. He’d be an end of the bench guy, but that might happen even though to this point there has been no real whispers about a landing spot for him.

As for the front office… he should get a chance. People should have a chance to prove themselves in life. He’ll have to work his way up but his 14-year NBA career and the fact he went through the NBA’s training program should get his foot in the door.

And that’s the kind of chance a lot of guys would kill for. Hopefully he makes the most of it.

Andre Iguodala a riskier free agent than meets the eye

Phoenix Suns v Denver Nuggets

Which of these players would you have most liked on your team last season: Andres Nocioni, Baron Davis, Brendan Haywood, Charlie Bell, Chris Mihm, Corey Maggette, Damien Wilkins, Earl Watson, Elton Brand, Fred Jones, Hedo Turkoglu, Joel Przybilla, John Salmons, Lamar Odom, Mehmet Okur, Metta World Peace, Michael Redd, Rashard Lewis, Rasual Butler, Ricky Davis, Ronald Murray, Stromile Swift, Tracy McGrady, Trenton Hassell or Walter Herrmann?

It’s hardly an inspiring list. World Peace was an alright starter for the Lakers. Brand took a lesser role with the Mavericks, and though his production slipped from previous years, it was still pretty good. Lamar Odom fit in well as a Clippers backup. Otherwise, the list is comprised of bit players or guys out of the NBA.

But all those players have something in common. They were 29 years old during the 2008-09 season. Four years later, they’re not nearly as appealing.

It’s a lesson to keep in mind as teams pursue Andre Iguodala, who opted out of the final year of a contract that would have paid him more than $16 million in order to seek a long-term deal.

Iguodala is an excellent defender and great in transition, two skills that typically don’t age well. He’s a good passer and a passable shooter, so it’s unlikely he’ll completely fall off the map, but any team pursuing him won’t be doing it for his passing and shooting.

A larger sample provides a reasonable expectation for Iguodala. Between the 1999-00 and 2008-09 seasons, 274 players have played a season at 29 years old. Here’s how their production, as measured by win shares, progressed from their 29-year-old seasons into the four following (adjusting for the lockout shortened 2011-12 season):


If Iguodala declines at the same rate – and the cracks already began to show last season, when his win-share total fell to 5.6 – his production will mirror, in order, the 2012-13 production of Tony Allen then Corey Brewer then Wayne Ellington then Evan Turner during the next four years. These aren’t stylistic comparisons, just using current players to set a comparison in production only.

Of course, this method for determining expected value includes players who fell out of the NBA counting as zero, but that’s intentional. Quite often, players can no longer play at an NBA level as they get into their 30s. We see the players like Steve Nash who defy age and remember them, forgetting about players like Chris Mihm who fall by the wayside. That inaccurately shifts our perception of how big a deal age is in the NBA.

I don’t expect Iguodala to fall out of the league before his next contract ends, even if it lasts four years, because he’d be beginning the deal with a higher starting point. But the relative decline of lesser players still informs an expected track for Iguodala.

Iguodala has plenty of value, and a team looking to win right now might knowingly accept the risk of his contract becoming an albatross just to get his immediate production. But teams should enter long-term negotiations with that risk in mind.

GM on Warriors turnaround: “Sense of desperation has passed”

San Antonio Spurs v Golden State Warriors - Game Six

Just three seasons ago, the Golden State Warriors were a 26-win team with Monta Ellis and Corey Maggette as their two leading scorers — this was a team in need of a radical overhaul.

Enter new ownership willing to invest in winning, new players to go with then rookie Stephen Curry, a new coach in Mark Jackson who got the team to believe in themselves — and after a few playoff wins things feel a lot different in the Bay Area.

Reports out of the Monday exit interviews in Golden State is that there were more smiles than you normally see at the end of the season — they realize they are a team on the rise, a team taking its first steps. And while those steps get harder, GM Bob Myers and coach Jackson rightfully struck an optimistic tone speaking with the media (via the AP):

“I think that sense of desperation has passed,” Myers said. “I think that whereas when you’re trying to do anything to get over the hump you do sometimes chase things that may be difficult to acquire. Whereas now, doesn’t mean we’re satisfied, it doesn’t mean we think our work is through, but we can be prudent and patient with opportunities as they come along….

“People do enjoy watching this group of players play. They do enjoy watching our games on TV and seeing what the crowd brings. They do enjoy watching our coaches get the most out of the players we have. What does that say? Well, if you’re a player in the NBA and you’re witnessing all these things, it does make it a desirable place to go and be a part of.”

Golden State’s core will be back next season, only a couple changes are likely. Jarrett Jack is a free agent, but the Warriors will get Brandon Rush back from injury. The more interesting question is Carl Landry, who is expected to opt out of his $4 million deal and we will see what the market will offer — and how much Golden State will pay to keep him.

But mostly the Warriors are a young team that should be better next season — Curry and Klay Thompson should improve with age, as will Harrison Barnes. Andrew Bogut should be healthier as will David Lee. This is a team on the rise.

And while the steps left to being a contender are not easy, Golden State has to feel pretty good about its position right now.