Tag: Collective Bargaining Agreement


As expected, Sixers to extend qualifying offers to Young, Hawes

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Both Thaddeus Young and Spencer Hawes will become restricted free agents come July 1… we think. I mean there will be a lockout and who the heck knows what things will look like on the other end of that.

What we do know is that this week the Sixers will extend qualifying offers to Young and Hawes, Philly.com’s Deep Sixer blog reports. This was expected. What that really means is that when both test the free agent market the Sixers will have the right to match the offers of any other team. (Probably. Again, totally unknown territory ahead of us, but that’s how the old system worked.)

If Hawes and Young do not reach any deal with other teams, they could return to the Sixers (both would be due $4 million next season).

The Sixers want to keep Young around but have been rumored to be thinking about another center.

Carmelo’s move may make CBA negotiations nastier

Carmelo Anthony James Dolan

Utah Jazz owner Greg Miller talked about it when he tried to explain to a shaken fan base why he felt he had to trade Deron Williams away.

His argument: it’s a new era of stars congregating in big markets. The players have taken control of the process in a way they have not before. We could not risk Williams leaving as a free agent and getting nothing for him, so we had to make this move.

But then Miller said something else that hints at just how difficult the collective bargaining agreement negotiations are going to be:

“I’m not interested in seeing a congregation of star players on a handful of teams throughout the league…” Miller said. “I would like to see as much parity as there can be in the league.”

What has happened in the last couple years is a monumental shift in how and where free agents will go, and how players are using the leverage of free agency to move around. Carmelo Anthony’s move to the Knicks was the latest, most publicized proof of that. But it is a trend, no doubt.

And some owners want to shut that down.

In the current CBA, players were given the freedom of movement, but the “home team” (the team the player was with) was given a huge advantage — they could offer more money and more years. Nobody was going to walk away from tens of millions on a max deal, right? For a long time that was enough of an advantage, players usually took the money.

But LeBron James and Chris Bosh took less money and planned a superteam. Carmelo Anthony used the leverage of taking less money to get to New York (with his money). Now smaller market owners like Miller are trading D-Will now rather than risk losing out.

The players have the power. Maybe they have always had the power, but they are flexing that muscle more now. And the owners want to shift that power balance — and the players are going to fight to keep it.

Maybe it’s through a franchise tag. Maybe it’s through changes in max contracts and a hard cap (or the severity of penalties for exceeding a soft cap). There are a lot of ways to do it. But you can bet the owners are pushing hard for a fundamental shift in the financial and player movement structures that exist now. There are a handful of big-market owners who are doves on this issue, but there are more and more smaller-market owners who are hawks.

Those hawks watched the Carmelo Anthony scenario play out, they watched LeBron and Bosh last summer and they said, “there but for the grace of God go I.” They know if they luck into drafting a true star, they could lose him. They could lose the meal ticket. It will be couched in terms of franchise viability, but what it really means is making sure they have ways to hold on to their elite players.

The National Basketball Players Association, the union, is going to fight to keep player movement. They will argue it is good for the league (television ratings are way up and league wide game attendance is up slightly). They will argue that it is only fair that a person who fulfills his contract can choose his place of employment.

This was going to be a nasty fight as it was. What happened with Carmelo will make it nastier. And longer. And that is worse for all of us.

Cavaliers find little trade market for Antawn Jamison

Antawn Jamison

Antawn Jamison has been the Cavaliers best player this season. Which is about like being the best member of ‘90s boy band No Authority. Don’t know who that is? Exactly.

For the Cavaliers it is about building for the future, not winning this season (obviously). So if they can move parts like Jamison to get some picks and young players they’d love to do it.

Except, nobody is really interested, said Marc Stein of ESPN.

NBA front-office sources say that few teams have been as active in recent weeks in trying to swing a trade or two before the Feb. 24 deadline than Cleveland — with Jamison high on its list of movable assets — but increasing apprehension about how restrictive the next labor agreement will be has prompted several teams to back off on deal-making.

Sources say New Orleans, for example, has a level of interest in Jamison, but also expressed skepticism that a suitable deal can be assembled before the deadline to send out the 35-year-old anywhere. It’s true that Jamison has only one year left on his contract after this season, but that one season is valued at a meaty $15.1 million, which means Cleveland would almost certainly have to take back multiple players back to make the salary-cap math work.

There’s always a lot of buzz around the trade deadline, but with nobody being sure what the new Collective Bargaining Agreement most teams will be hesitant to make a big move. Financial flexibility is what it’s all about. And that takes all the fun out of the trade deadline.

Knicks’ Wilson Chandler fires agent, looks to cash in next summer

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Back in the fall, Wilson Chandler’s agent Chris Luchey tried to convince Knicks GM Donnie Walsh to sign his client — whose rookie deal was about to end — to an extension. The Knicks are all about financial flexibility going forward, so they said no.

Chandler has gone out and had the best year of his career. He’s giving New York 17.6 points a game, he’s shooting 35.9 percent from three, he finished at the rim at a crazy good 78 percent, and he’s improved his rebounding. The guy is even getting blocked shots. (That said, he’s being moved to come off the bench starting Friday night, so that Ronny Turiaf can start.)

He’s going to get paid this summer, and he wants a new agent to make sure he gets the most out of that. And of course, as with all thinks Knicks right now, it ultimately ties back into Carmelo Anthony. Chandler could be part of a package sent west if a deal is struck. From Newsday:

Chris Luchey, who has represented Chandler since he entered the NBA Draft in 2007, confirmed to Newsday that he has been let go. Luchey called it “amicable” and said he had “no ill will” toward Chandler, which is an interesting choice of words considering “Ill Wil” is one of Chandler’s nicknames….

The Knicks want to keep Chandler, who is a favorite of the coaching staff for his coachability and very quiet, hardworking demeanor (not to mention his steadily improving talent), and his status as a restricted free agent might actually be what keeps him in New York. The Nuggets like Chandler as a talent, but there is concern about what they’d have to pay him as a restricted free agent. Luchey was looking for money similar to the five-year, $60 million deal Danny Granger signed with the Pacers in 2008.

Chandler is a three who can run and fill it up. He has value (whether it’s Granger value is up for debate). How that will translate into dollars in a new Collective Bargaining Agreement is another question entirely. After the deal is struck, teams may be tight fisted.

If that is the case, the Knicks may match what the market offers.

Stephon Marbury sums up the lockout talk pretty well

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Halfway around the world, playing hoops in a coastal Chinese city most Americans have never heard of, Stephon Marbury is watching the NBA’s Collective Bargaining Agreement negotiations unfold.

And he gets it, just check out this quote from a New York Magazine profile.

“There’s definitely going to be a lockout in the NBA after this season. The owners do not want to pay older players, and the players will cave, because they’re only focused on now. The owners, they’re looking at this long term, like a fifteen-year business investment.”

Seriously, that is it in a nutshell. The owners want a way to get out of their own bad decisions — they keep giving the Joe Johnsons of the world six-year max deals that they regret by year four an have to pay for two more. They want a mulligan on their own choices and that is one thing they are willing to go to the mattresses over.

It is just part of the owners belief the core of the system is flawed, and they are willing to suffer the repercussions of reduced gate and fan interest for years to fix it.

The players don’t want things to change dramatically, but their convictions (and money) will run out more quickly. Marbury says they “cave,” you can say they became willing to compromise, the phrasing is moot. Just know that’s most likely how it all goes down. The only question is will regular season games lost?

On another note, go read the entire fascinating profile of a more mature Marbury. A guy who may be out there but who has a real appreciation for what he had and has. However, he has no appreciation for Chinese food. Which can be a challenge when living in China. However, he plans to stay and do business in China for a long time to come.