Tag: Cleveland Cavaliers

LeBron James

NBA proposes creating more space along baseline


LeBron James crashed into a cameraman in the NBA Finals, and he wanted the players association to look into the where photographers were allowed to set up.

Well, the NBPA has. In conjunction with the NBA, it seems a rule change is coming.

Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

Adam Silver said Tuesday that a proposal was presented to the Competition Committee and Board of Governors to create additional escape lanes for players.

Under the proposal, on which the league consulted with the National Basketball Players Association, the escape lanes on either side of each basket stanchion would be widened by a foot. Also, an additional escape lane would be created on the other side of that first camera position on either side.

“We think it’s necessary,” Silver said. “… It’s a constant balance we’re looking to achieve in terms of getting those great images out to our fans around the world, allowing the media to appropriately cover our game and finding the right balance for player safety.”

This would be a good rule change.

Plenty of talented photographers and videographers cover the NBA, and they can get compelling shots from areas farther from the court. They don’t need to be so close as to put player safety at risk.

Of course, this issue gets more attention now that LeBron is involved, and I get how that bugs some people. But at least progress is being made. The root of it shouldn’t matter too much.

Report: Cavaliers, Matthew Dellavedova still well apart on new contract

2015 NBA Finals - Game Three

Matthew Dellavedova was the breakout star of the first three games of the NBA Finals — his grit and tenacity was at the heart of Cleveland’s post-injuries grinding style. He was doing as well defending Stephen Curry as can be humanly expected. Well, until  Curry figured him and the Cavaliers out near the end of Game 3 (by Game 4 the Warriors had solved the riddle, and it was all over but the buckets). Walk around Cleveland and only LeBron James got more love than Delly.

But a few games of playoff success should not be confused with future earnings.

The Cavaliers and Dellavedova both want reach a new deal that keeps the reserve point guard being the guy off the bench behind Kyrie Irving (Dellavedova is a restricted free agent, the Cavs can match any offer he gets). But they are nowhere near a deal, reports Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated.

Not much movement between the Cavaliers and Matthew Dellavedova on a new contract. A restricted free agent, Dellavedova is seeking a multiyear deal starting at $4 million per season, per a source, and the Cavs have balked, largely due to the enormous luxury tax implications that come with that type of contract. The market has largely dried up—Jeremy Lin’s deal with Charlotte closed a potential door—so it will be interesting to see how long this stalemate continues. Paging LeBron James.

It’s was always going to be hard for Dellavedova (or, more accurately, his agent) to secure an offer sheet from another team for the point guard because teams assumed the Cavs would just match. Why tie up your cap space for a few days to offer a player you’re not going to get?

Then there is the financial issue, which former Nets executive Bobby Marks explained (follow that game one twitter).

Yikes. Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert is going to be writing a payroll check in likely more than $200 million next season, once you figure in luxury taxes. To his credit, he didn’t balk at maxing out Kevin Love (or LeBron) and he the Cavs have spent to deepen the bench. But he’s drawing the line at overpaying for Tristan Thompson (who reportedly wants Draymond Green money) or Dellavedova.

Those guys are fan favorites, and more importantly LeBron favorites. But how much luxury tax do you want to pay for them?

Cavaliers coach David Blatt thought coming to the NBA ‘was going to be a breeze’

David Blatt

When the Cavaliers hired David Blatt to coach the team last summer, it was a very different job than the one he ultimately got.

Blatt was hired long before LeBron James made the decision to return to the franchise, so Blatt believed he’d be charged with rebuilding around Kyrie Irving, Dion Waiters, and the first overall pick in last year’s draft, Andrew Wiggins.

Things changed immediately once James came to town, obviously, and the Cavs started adding pieces around him that would put them in a position to contend for a title, and do so immediately.

Because of the franchise’s sudden change of course, Blatt encountered a far more difficult transition to the NBA than he had initially envisioned.

From the Associated Press (via SLAM):

Blatt — a wildly successful coach in Europe before getting his long-awaited chance to lead an NBA team for the first time last season — was a panelist on Monday at a scouting school in Las Vegas, part of a group that was discussing some of the ways coaches prepare for games at various levels. And he detailed several differences between the European game and the NBA one.

“When I came to the NBA I was under the impression that this was going to be a breeze,” Blatt said. “I’ve been coaching for 23 years at the highest level in Europe. I coached in the national-team environment, coached professional teams, coached Euroleague teams and I thought I thought I knew basketball and I thought I knew how to coach. Which, in my mind, I did.

“But I realized that when I came over here it was a very, very different game with a whole new set of problems and a whole slew of things to deal with inside and outside of the game.”

That “outside of the game” part is what was likely the biggest issue.

Blatt was forced to try to manage the ego of the game’s greatest player, and by most accounts, he failed miserably. LeBron threw him under the bus and diminished his coach’s importance more than once, which forced Blatt to do what he could, while acquiescing to his star player consistently.

The Cavaliers did get to the Finals, though, and Blatt will be back on the sidelines next season — which means he was more than smart enough to eventually figure things out.