Tag: Christian Eyenga

Eddy Curry, Andre Iguodala

Tuesday And-1 links: Shed a tear, Spurs waive Eddy Curry


Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• Eddy Curry had actually looked better than you might expect for the Spurs this preseason, but that wasn’t enough. He was a longshot from the start. The Spurs cut Curry on Tuesday (along with Derrick Brown), the team announced. Hard to imagine a soft landing spot for him in the league.

• Speaking of guys waived in the last few days, there is Christian Eyenga (Lakers), Walker Russell (Thunder), Chris Douglas-Roberts (Lakers), and Greg Somogyi (Lakers).

Yao Ming golfing. Those are going to be some very long clubs.

• The Nuggets have exercised third year options on Kenneth Faried and Jordan Hamilton in a surprise to nobody anywhere.

• Actually less shocking, the Pistons exercised their fourth-year option for Greg Monroe.

Great post looking at how the Nets guards (Deron Williams, Joe Johnson) operate out of the post. That team has a lot of offensive options. Defense on the other hand….

An interesting interview with Jim Buss, the guy at the top of the Lakers front office food chain right now, son of Jerry Buss and the guy making the decisions. And he has his own stats formula, thank you very much.

• If you want more Lakers’ interviews, here is one with Pau Gasol.

Might the Heat decide to trade Joel Anthony?

• Paul Pierce can’t see himself in any uniform but a Celtics’ one. Have to agree there, it would look weird.

• Looks like Al Horford will be back in the Hawks lineup on Friday for the final preseason game.

• Detroit’s Corey Maggette’s has a “slight pull” in his left calf and he will be out for a while. Stunning, I know.

• Great post looking at the best minimum-salary players in the NBA. Hello Delonte West.

Some more details on how Royce White plans to get to some (most?) Rockets away games without flying.

• Lamar Odom was held out of Monday’s Clippers preseason game with what Vinny Del Negro described as a bone bruise on his knee. That does not help his conditioning issue.

• Hornets big man Jason Smith may miss the rest of the Hornets’ preseason to let his sore shoulder heal.

• Rookie Doran Lamb, who had battled an elbow injury, returned to practice for the Bucks on Tuesday.

• Wizards rookie Bradley Beal was held out of practice on Tuesday as a precaution after an ankle tweak, but it appears to be nothing serious.

• A Q&A with Dallas big Elton Brand.

Brian Scalabrine previews the Boston Celtics.

• Here is a blog post slamming the general populace of the Los Angeles Lakers fan base (some NSFW language, if that bothers you). As a guy who cut his blogging teeth on a Lakers site of my creation and who lives in Los Angeles, all I’ll say is this — I started a Lakers blog in part to be able to control the level of Lakers discourse going on around me.

• For those of you who need your occasional fix of international basketball, we have good news. FIBA and ESPN have announced a multi-year deal that has them covering the FIBA Americas Championships (2013, 2015), the
EuroBaskets (2013, 2015), the FIBA Basketball World Cup (2014). You can also add the FIBA World Championship for Women (2014) to the list.

NBA Preview: Orlando Magic

Orlando Magic v Indiana Pacers - Game Five

Last season: Oh, what a tangled web we weave…

The Magic won 37 games (to 29 losses) last season because for a stretch in the first half of the season they were one of the top-five teams in the NBA. Dwight Howard was putting up his usual MVP numbers (well, not last season next to LeBron but he should be in the conversation most years), the Magic were defending and on offense knocking down threes.

But from the first days the foundation was going to crumble and it came apart in a way worthy of The Days of Our Lives. Howard and his people were pushing hard for a trade to the Nets, and they had leverage with his ability to opt-out in the summer. Except the Magic were not playing along, wanting a better deal and not to give Howard what he wanted. Then Howard caved and opted-in with the Magic for next season, so they didn’t have to trade him. Then Stan Van Gundy threw Howard under the bus in front of he New York Media. Then Howard’s back injury worsened and he had to sit out of the playoffs.

The Magic got run in the first round of the playoffs by the Pacers, then they fired Stan Van Gundy, then they eventually traded Howard to the Lakers in a four-team deal that netted them essentially five picks (three future picks and two recent players) but none of them lottery picks.

Key Departures: Orlando is going the Oklahoma City model — they are looking to be terrible and get good again through the draft. Dwight Howard is gone. While that is obvious you really need to think through how big a loss that is — he is a three-time defensive player of the year who made them one of the better defensive teams in the league for years, plus he was the hub of their offense. He is arguably the third best player in basketball right now. That’s not easy to replace.

Also gone is stretch-four sharpshooter Ryan Anderson, a guy bordering on All-Star status. Then there is Jason Richardson. That would be three of the top four scorers for the Magic. By the way, numbers five and six on the scoring list last season — J.J. Redick and Hedo Turkoglu — can be yours in a trade for picks and prospects.

Key Additions: The best player they got in the Howard trade is Arron Afflalo, a solid two-way swingman who will be asked to do a lot more scoring than he has in the past but will play well. Through the trade they also landed rookie Moe Harkless, the St. John’s star who has promise but is raw. There also is Gustavo Ayon and Al Harrington, but you get the idea. The Magic did not make this trade trying to get better, they are intentionally going to be bad.

One guy who could catch on, Andrew Nicholson. You didn’t see him play in college unless you watched a lot of St. Bonaventure, but in Summer League he averaged 12.6 points and 6.8 rebounds a game. He will get a chance.

Orlando also added new head coach Jacque Vaughn, who gets thrown into the fire of his first NBA job in charge of a roster Phil Jackson couldn’t win with.

Three keys to the Magic season:

1) When do they trade J.J. Redick, Hedo Turkoglu and Glen Davis? The Magic are not going to be good this year, but they are going to get worse. Orlando is going with what is now called the Oklahoma City Thunder model of building through the draft. So the second they can unload one of these veterans for picks and prospects they will. Likely it all happens closer to the deadline, but you are going to hear a lot of Magic trade rumors. General Manager Rob Hennigan has a plan and they are not going halfway on it.

2) How many wins does Jameer Nelson get them? With all the roster changes and revamping the Magic brought Nelson back on a three-year deal. He is the one guy still on the roster who has proven he can up points plenty of at the NBA level, although last season he averaged 11.9 points and 5.7 assists per game. The light for Nelson will be green; he is now freed up to shoot pretty much whenever he wants. His career high is 16.7 points per game and don’t be shocked if he bests that.

But he’s not going to get them a lot of wins. (Not that the Magic brass want him to.) This is the guy you pair with an elite player, he is not elite. And his defense has not been impressive at all the past couple seasons.

3) Can Jacque Vaughn get the youth to develop? In the end for the Magic, it’s really about seeing if Moe Harkless and Andrew Nicholson can develop into solid complimentary players to the franchise guy they hope to draft down the line. Same with Kyle O’Quinn and Christian Eyenga. (Afflalo certainly would fit in, he’s proven it.) Right now it’s about developing talent for the long-term and seeing if the guys can fit in. And part of that has to fall to Vaughn to lead and teach them.

What Magic fans should fear: That the plan doesn’t really work. It’s not easy to land three years of consecutive top four picks like the Thunder did, and they were fortunate to have Kevin Durant fall to them. Then they nailed the Westbrook and Harden picks. Cleveland had the series of top picks as well and they have Kyrie Irving, Tristan Thompson and Dion Waiters, and we’ll see how that plays out. But to get the picks is hard and to get the right guy at spots No. 2 and No. 4 is not easy (sometimes not even at No. 1).

This tear it down and build it back up strategy is the right one, but it’s far from easy or foolproof. And it’s going to take years to judge.

How it likely works out: Orlando will be one of the worst teams in the NBA this season, and Magic fans better be prepared for that. It’s not about wins, it’s about Shabazz Muhammad and Nerlens Noel. Expect trades mid-season and a lot of very hard-to-watch losses. Most painful may be that the biggest weakness will be big men in the paint.

The hope is that you see sparks from Harkless, that Nelson and Afflalo can provide some points and the team rallies around Vaughn and is competitive. We saw a lot of losses from the Hornets last season but they played hard for Monty Williams, they defended better, and that’s where the signs of hope will be for Magic fans.

Prediction: 22-60 and a whole lot of ping-pong balls. It’s not going to be pretty in the short term, but that is the plan.

What was in Rockets offer for Dwight Howard depends on whom you ask

Orlando Magic v Phoenix Suns

Rob Hennigan, the Orlando Magic’s new on the job general manager, and the entire Magic organization is taking a lot of incoming fire — that’s all you got for Dwight Howard?

What they got in a four-team deal that landed Howard with the Lakers was a quality wing in Arron Afflalo, veteran forwards Al Harrington and Josh McRoberts, just drafted Moe Harkless, center Nikola Vucevic, and Christian Eyenga, plus three first-round picks (the worse of Denver’s two picks in 2014, the Sixers lottery-protected pick in 2015 and the Lakers’ 2017 pick); and two second-round picks (Denver’s in the next draft and the Lakers’ in 2015).

Orlando has sold that as a package they can start to rebuild around. Fans and pundits have thought they could do better. Some thought the Nets package was better, but the Magic didn’t want to send Howard to his preferred destination, plus any package built around rebuilding with Brook Lopez is flawed.

But what about the Rockets offer of better picks, more cap relief and young players. Maybe it wasn’t all that great after all. Here is what Sam Amick of Sports Illustrated writes in an interview with Rob Hennigan.

In both the two-team talks with Houston and three-team discussions that involved the Lakers and would have sent center Andrew Bynum to the Rockets, sources said Houston was offering only two first-round picks. From Houston’s perspective, however, the comparative value of the picks far outweighed anything available to the Magic elsewhere and it had been made clear that a third pick could be added “if it got the deal done….

Many assumed that the Rockets’ three first-round picks from this year’s draft — guard Jeremy Lamb and forwards Royce White and Terrence Jones — would be made available in a Howard deal. But sources close to the Magic said Lamb was the only such prospect offered, and that he was off the table by the time the talks involved the Lakers and Lamb had impressed at the Las Vegas summer league in July (he averaged 20 points in five games…

On the Rockets’ side, meanwhile, sources said the message had been sent that the Magic could have one or possibly two prospects from a pool that included Marcus Morris, Patrick Patterson, Lamb, Jones, White and Donatas Motiejunas. Houston offered significant salary-cap relief, but, as had been the case on the topic of young players, never in the form that the Magic wanted.

This is a case of he said/he said.

The Magic are saying the prospects they might have wanted from the Rockets were never formally on the table, but the Rockets are saying they were there as part of the ongoing negotiations. This is how trade talks flow, informal ideas are batted about — like the Rockets say they did — but nothing is put into a formal offer until it is pretty far along. So the Magic can claim the guys were not offered, even though if they had asked those players were.

To me, it’s a little moot. The Magic were going to get far less than market value back. They chose the offer they thought helped their cause the most— and that is key, they chose it, this deal was not forced up on them. They had options, they chose this one. You may have chosen differently, but the bottom like it was going to be the Pu Pu platter of things nobody wants regardless of the choice.

The Magic got what they thought was best. What really matters is how they use the picks and draft the next couple years. Do that well and they will have gotten what they wanted out of the trade.

It’s official: League approves four-team deal, Howard a Laker

Kobe Bryant Dwight Howard

Some Lakers fans were convinced David Stern was going to try to kill this blockbuster, balance changing trade. And you could bet if he really could have some owners (*cough*Mark Cuban*cough*) would have pressured him to do so.

But the league had no real standing to block this trade — because it can be justified for basketball reasons and because Stern is not the defacto owner of the team like he was with the Hornets when he called off the Chris Paul trade. This trade was going through. And it has, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports and the NBC Sports Network:

The teams finalized the trade on a call with NBA officials Friday afternoon.

So here is how the trade works out.

Lakers get: Dwight Howard, Chris Duhon and Earl Clark,

Magic get: Arron Afflalo, Al Harrington, Josh McRoberts, Christian Eyenga, Nikola Vucevic, Moe Harkless, three first round picks (one from each team), two second-round picks.

76ers get: Andrew Bynum and Jason Richardson.

Nuggets get: Andre Iguodala.

As I said before, I like this trade a lot for the Lakers, Sixers and Denver. They all get better and have guys that fit with what they want to do.

As for Orlando, they said they wanted to get picks, get some good young players and save some cap space. There was no good deal for them to take, there was nothing remotely like equal value, so they looked for a way to rebuild. Most of the guys they just picked up are nice rotation players, and the picks will be lower in the draft order. However, the Magic are going to be bad and it is their own picks the next few years that will be key to them getting to rebuild through the draft.

Could they have saved more money and gotten better picks from Houston? Probably. This is not a great deal. But I don’t think we can call it a bust until we see how those picks pan out. And that’s going to take years.

But it’s done now, either way. Good luck, Magic fans. Lakers fans, you don’t need it.

Damian Lillard continues to impress at NBA Summer League

damian lillard
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LAS VEGAS — Seven days in Las Vegas is a long time regardless of the occasion, but there are times that it has seemed particularly long this week as four games in a gym watching fringe NBA players play basketball can surprisingly take its toll on a guy. There are always a few moments that make it all worth it, though, and Thursday’s performance from Damian Lillard did just that.

Lillard, the Portland Trail Blazers first round draft pick, has been pretty great all week … though he’s somehow slid just a bit under the radar as the game this writer’s been watching has taken place in the other gym. That all changed on Thursday in the Cox Pavilion, however, as the Weber State product didn’t disappoint with yet another impressive performance.

Portland’s new point guard entered the game averaging 26 points while shooting better than 41 percent from beyond the arc through his new team’s first two games and followed that up with an impressive 31 points and seven assists while limiting himself to just three turnovers after committing seven the game prior. It’s tough to tell how much Summer League performances matter, but Lillard’s having one heck of an exhibition season.

The rest of Thursday’s standouts are as follows:

  • Thomas Robinson got the best of Jared Sullinger as the Sacramento Kings beat the Boston Celtics, but since that’s already been written about here, let’s instead single out undrafted free agent Tony Mitchell. The Alabama alumnus scored 13 points off the bench in yet another solid effort as he continues to show that he can put the ball in the bucket at this level.
  • The Minnesota Timberwolves beat the Cleveland Cavaliers in large part thanks to the play of last year’s No. 2 pick Derrick Williams, but Coby Karl’s shooting was probably the more fun aspect to watch (no offense to Derrick’s crazy drives to the bucket, of course). Karl, the son of George made six of his seven 3-point attempts en route to 18 points off the bench — and blocked a shot to boot.
  • Dionte Christmas led the Boston Celtics in scoring on Thursday and, although it happened in a loss, it was a good look for him as continues to be impressive in Summer League. The most surprising part is that his shot is still falling considering the Celtics completed their eight game since last Monday after previously competing in the Orlando Summer League.
  • Ed Davis continued to impress for the Toronto Raptors on Vegas as he helped his team pick up a close victory over the New York Knicks with 15 points, 11 rebounds and a pair of blocked shots while taking exactly what he was given — a facet most second-year players are struggling with here in Vegas. Aside from rookie Terrence Ross (2-for-8, five points), the whole Raptors team looked pretty good on the offensive end, but Chris Wright — formerly of the Golden State Warriors — stood out most with 15 points, six rebounds and the usual array of powerful dunks in transition.
  • Tobias Harris was good once again in Vegas with 21 points and 12 rebounds against the D-League Select team, but the well-built wing turned the ball over an unsightly seven times. Tarence Kinsey, former member of the Memphis Grizzlies, scored 14 points as he attempts to return to relevance — and took a solid step toward that with a nice defensive effort in extended minutes on Thursday.
  • The Los Angeles Lakers needed five games to get a win in Vegas, but at least it happened. The way it happened was quite intriguing, too, as Christian Eyenga scoring 22 points — quite a few on jump shots, no less — was not what Summer League fans expected. Julian Khazzouh wasn’t bad either as the Australian big man scored 16 points and grabbed six rebounds as a pick-and-pop option alongside Robert Sacre.
  • Tyler Zeller came back to earth for the Cleveland Cavaliers with a 1-for-7 shooting performance after looking much better than that earlier in the week and, not surprisingly, it led to a Cleveland loss. Not all was bad for the Cavs, though, as Tristan Thompson scored 16 points on 7-of-10 shooting while a reformed Samardo Samuels had 14 points and added five assists.
  • It unfortunately came in a loss, but Adam Morrison was once again impressive for the Los Angeles Clippers on Thursday night. The former third overall pick hit his usual array of difficult shots on the way to 22 points as he tries to earn his way on to an NBA roster. Terrico White was good off the bench, too, finishing the game with 10 points and four rebounds.
  • The D-League Select Team fell behind early and simply couldn’t recover, though it wasn’t due to a lack of effort. Instead the team just couldn’t convert on the offensive end. Kenny Hayes (15 points) and Leo Lyons (nine points, 10 rebounds) were bright spots, but it simply was not enough.
  • The Knicks’ Summer League squad hasn’t looked very good all week aside from Chris Copeland (who has already wrapped up a training camp invite) and, unfortunately, that was the case again on Thursday afternoon. Copeland, despite missing a crucial bucket late, scored a game-high 17 points while the rest of his team struggled … though new addition Sylven Landesberg was a pleasant surprise with 10 points and no turnovers after playing last season in Israel.
  • Mike Scott, the second round pick of the Atlanta Hawks, led an underwhelming effort for the Atlanta Hawks as they finished up their Summer League schedule with 14 points and seven rebounds.

More action continues on Friday with seven games slated to take place. Hopefully the excitement comes in more than just small spurts.