Tag: Chris Wallace

Boston Celtics v Detroit Pistons, Game 6

Fans send Rajon Rondo, Kevin Garnett to bench in latest All-Star balloting

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Apparently Boston sports fans have been so focused on what Tom Brady is going to do to the Jets secondary they forgot to vote for the NBA All-Star Game starters.

How else do you explain the latest release of NBA All-Star voting which drops two Celtics from the starting lineup? Chicago’s Derrick Rose has leapfrogged Rajon Rondo for the second starting guard spot in the East. At the same time, the Knicks Amar’e Stoudemire has passed the injured Kevin Garnett for the second starting forward spot.

The leads are not large — Rose is just 54,264 votes ahead of Rondo, while Stoudemire leads Garnett by a healthier 93,847 (that may be hard to make up). If the voting doesn’t change, the Celtics would have no starters in the All-Star Game. Which seems wrong.

The rest of the positions remain the same from the last round of released votes. In the East, Miami’s Dwyane Wade would start with Rose at guard; LeBron James would start at forward with Stoudemire, and Orlando center Dwight Howard remains the highest vote getter in the East overall and would start as well.

For the West, Kobe Bryant is still the guy who has gotten more votes than anyone in either conference (1,757,216) and would start with Chris Paul in the backcourt. The West forwards remain Kevin Durant and Carmelo Anthony.

If Anthony and his 945,720 votes were traded to the New Jersey Nets or New York Knicks (or any team in the East) before the game his votes would travel with him. And that vote total would have him fourth among Eastern forwards, still well behind James, Stoudemire and Garnet. Meanwhile, Pau Gasol is third in the Western Conference forward balloting and likely would move up to start.

The other question is center for the West — word that Yao Ming is out for the season has apparently not reached China, where voters keep punching his ticket to Los Angeles for the game. He is hundreds of thousands of votes ahead of second place Andrew Bynum of the Lakers.

When (not if, when) Yao is selected, the Western Conference coach (come on down, Gregg Popovich) gets to select who will start at center. He could choose Bynum, or he could slide a forward playing a lot of center for his team — Pau Gasol, Tim Duncan — over to the slot to alleviate the log jam at Western Conference forward. Popovich is not bound by the ballot fans have when he makes his choices.

Voting is still open and will remain open for 10 more days. The fan voting selects the five All-Star game starters. The coaches then select the seven reserve players. NBA Commissioner David Stern then adds a 13th player to the roster.

NBA All-Star Weekend will take place Feb. 18-20 at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Of Xavier Henry, Nate Robinson, rookie contracts and incentives

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henry_Stern.jpgXavier Henry and the Memphis Grizzlies remain at an impasse.

There are only two first round picks from the last draft that have not signed, and they both belong to the Memphis Grizzlies. It’s because Memphis has broken with what is seen as rookie contract tradition.

According to the Collective Bargaining Agreement, rookie contracts are on a scale, in Henry’s case that first year salary is $1,683,500.

Memphis can offer from 80 to 120 percent of that scale. Teams almost always offer the 120 percent figure (the Spurs are the prominent exception). As is pointed out in a great contracts post at Sham Sports today, often incentives are used to reach that 120 percent figure (or a part of it). But those incentives often are pretty obtainable things, such as keeping up with workouts. Things that the player can control.

Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace doesn’t see it at way, as he told David Aldridge at NBA.com.

“There have been some teams that have tied performance bonuses to the 20 percent,” Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace said on Sunday. “Basically, our position is that the extra 20 is a bonus. And bonus means additional performance. We feel like if a guy gets on the court and plays for us, then you’re contributing to our team in a significant way.”

Wallace is tying the bonus to the number of minutes Henry plays.

That brings us to the Nate Robinson story. Last year late in the year, Doc Rivers sat Nate Robinson for a few games. Robinson had a couple rough games before that, but that is Nate — some nights brilliant, some nights he struggles more. Sit him and you risk missing one of those nights when he wins the game for you off the bench. Rivers sat him anyway.

Then it turns out missing those games cost Robinson a contract bonus of $1 million. As Boston was paying the luxury tax, that is $2 million in savings to the franchise.

Look at that and you can see why Henry and his agent Arn Tellem balk at the idea of Henry’s bonus being in control of the team. Over the course of his rookie deal, that 20 percent could be worth $1.7 million. A lot of money to a rookie and to a small market team.

So here we stand. Memphis has picked a fight with a tiger in Tellem, and the fight drags on. To the potential detriment of the franchise and the player. Maybe it’s all just a foreshadowing of the lockout next summer.

Grizzlies admit they were wrong about 2009 draft, still completely miss the point

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The Grizzlies have learned! They admitted a mistake! An NBA front office actually admitted a draft mistake! Good times are on the way! We can learn!

Or not.

The Memphis Commercial Appeal’s Geoff Calkins has an article today leading with a fine quote from the man in charge of the Grizzlies, Michael Heisley. If you thought the answer to that question was General Manager Chris Wallace, you’re looking for the “basketball teams run sensibly” class down the hall. Heisley leads the article admitting that the Grizzlies made a huge mistake in last year’s draft. Having begged the Grizzlies not to take Hasheem Thabeet, this was an especially sweet moment of closure for me and…

Wait, what?


Turns out Heisley completely glosses over the highest pick to ever be assigned to the D-League who still looks two to three years away from being able to contribute even meaningful, much less impactful minutes, and instead decides to throw the 27th overall pick DeMarre Carroll under the bus in order to praise DeJuan Blair. From the Appeal:

“We should have taken him,” Heisley said. “He was 15th on our list. But
sometimes, in the heat of the moment, you get derailed. We got swayed by
some discussions with the doctors. This year, we’re going to take the
guy who is next on our list or someone is going to have to do a very
good job explaining to me why we’re not.”

Oh, okay, I see what you’re doing there. You’re making a joke. You’re saying that instead of your big mistake last year being the drafting of a seven foot pogo stick who had to be assigned to Dakota for 10 days in order for him to start even knowing where he was on the floor with the #2 overall pick in a loaded draft, that it was really you taking a hard nosed defender with upside over a guy who 29 other teams passed on due to his considerable injury history. All of this while retaining Mike Conley. I get it. Very funny, Mike. Such a kidder.

But, of course, because the world is a cruel and dark place, Heisley is not kidding. Look, let’s be clear. Yes, passing on Blair was a mistake. He’s shown in his rookie year that provided the super-glue and duct-tape holding his major leg joint together remains intact, he can definitely contribute with fierce rebounding and tough putbacks at the NBA level. And the Grizzlies had one of the worst benches in the league last year. But then again, drafting Blair would have meant this is what the Grizzlies’ frontcourt would have looked like, in terms of viable options:

Zach Randolph,Marc Gasol, DeJuan Blair, Hasheem Thabeet, Hamed Haddadi

That’s a lot of big guys to distribute minutes to.

Now, let’s look at their real, honest to God, viable backcourt rotation:

Mike Conley (kind of, sort of), O.J. Mayo

Right, because it’s really that 27th pick that hurt you. Let’s try that last part again with any of several combinations.

Tyreke Evans, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley
Stephen Curry, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley
Brandon Jennings, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley
Darren Collison, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley

The list goes on. I’d even throw Jonny Flynn in there.

I appreciate that Heisley is admitting that mistakes were made, which is an important part of rebuilding a relationship with your fans. But the Grizzlies continue to try very hard, and yet somehow completely miss the point. Drafting DeMarre Carroll was certainly not a brilliant move, but not because they could have had DeJuan Blair. This is all beside the fact that as Heisley says this, he’s simultaneously damaging the team’s relationship with Carroll who can still contribute (and who they’ll need if he doesn’t want to pay out the wazoo for Rudy Gay) and glossing over the fact that they had another pick in front of him!

The Grizzlies had him 15th, and passed on him at 27 . But what about selecting Sam Young at 36, after you’d just drafted a highly identical player at a position you’re loaded at? Heisley makes it sound like the low-hanging fruit was right there, they had their hand on it, and pulled it way. But the truth is they walked right back around to the fruit again, and still decided it had worms in it.

Blair has been a force for the Spurs, in very limited minutes, and while he certainly projects to an All-Star, the knees are legitimate concerns. That’s why the Grizzlies weren’t alone in passing on him. But if they’re looking in the mirror to try and learn from their mistakes, it’s not that pick that should haunt them. It’s the cavalcade of all-rookie team selections that followed immediately after the player they went with after their rare lottery luck landed them the second overall.

As usual with Memphis, the right idea is there, the execution isn’t. Close, but no cigar. And by cigar, I mean Tyreke Evans.