Tag: Chris Paul trade

Chris Paul

Chris Paul confirms he will stay with Clippers next season


When Chris Paul was traded to the Clippers, it was with the understanding that he would give them a couple years — this season, and he would opt-in for next season. Opt in for a cool $17.8 million.

But there was a concern he would opt-out after this season, either to go play with someone else or because Clippers owner Donald Sterling screwed it up.

Clippers fans can exhale. On the Jim Rome radio show this week, Paul confirmed that “the decision was made” (via Eye on Basketball).

Which was true from the start — that option was voided when he was traded. He will stay with the Clippers.

He likely will stay beyond that. This is a team that is the most legitimate threat to the Oklahoma City Thunder over the next five years. With Paul and Blake Griffin they have the transcendent players, around them they have quality role players like DeAndre Jordan, Mo Williams, Kenyon Martin and more.

They could use another piece or two, but Paul is not going to find a better landing space than the Clippers — big market (meaning big marketing opportunities off the court), winning team with potential, and fans who idolize him. Not only will he opt in, I’d be shocked if he didn’t sign an extension (or opt-out then re-sign with the Clippers, for financial reasons) after next season.

Suns successful in avoiding media circus around Nash’s impending free agency

Minnesota Timberwolves v Phoenix Suns

The Suns held their annual media day on Friday, and overall, things were pretty quiet. Too quiet, even. Especially when you consider that the face of the franchise, heart and soul of the team, and two-time MVP Steve Nash is playing in the final year of his contract, and will be an unrestricted free agent once this shortened season comes to an end next summer.

There was only an average amount of media in attendance — save for an unusually large contingent of local hip-hop radio stations, for some reason. But no one from the local or national side seemed interested in pressing anyone on the team or in the organization for answers regarding possible future plans to deal Nash at any time before his contract runs out.

The non-news is news. And you need to look no further than Orlando, New Orleans, or Los Angeles to see what we’re talking about.

The constant barrage of questions regarding the status of Dwight Howard, Chris Paul, and Pau Gasol — whose names all surfaced in substantive trade reports over the past couple of weeks before the Paul deal to the Clippers was finalized — has to be detrimental to these teams’ efforts to focus on the preparation for the upcoming season.

In Phoenix, though, it hasn’t been an issue, thanks to the way that both the front office and Nash himself have gone about their business since training camp has begun. Suns president of basketball operations Lon Babby told NBCSports.com that it’s at least a little bit by design.

“My view of it is — and I’ve communicated this to Steve, and he knows how I feel about it and he knows how our franchise feels about it. He’s an iconic part of this community and an iconic part of this team and still an elite, elite player,” Babby said. “That’s the idea — that he is our most important player. He knows he can stay here as long as he wants.”

That means the Suns aren’t shopping Nash, and the decision, at this point, is entirely his. So, no rumors are out there from anonymous sources that would put blood in the water that would cause the media to go into a frenzied attack. Nash only fielded one question about his status during his brief media session on Friday, and casually brushed it aside.

“I’m not really thinking about it,” Nash said of his contract situation. “I just want to try to make this team into a playoff team. At this stage of my career, I’m not thinking about tomorrow. I’m just thinking about today.”

And that was that.

Babby admits he has thought about the future, but in his mind, it’s one where Nash re-signs in Phoenix. He spent some time over the summer brushing up on how some other Hall of Fame point guards spent their final seasons, with the hope that he can paint a similar and convincing picture for Nash when the time comes.

“I pointed out to him, you know, John Stockton and Magic Johnson and Isiah Thomas, some great point guards who all went to the Hall of Fame, all stayed with one team until the very end,” Babby said. “Over the summer I read articles about John Stockton’s retirement day, and I tried to portray that to Steve a little bit. He hasn’t been here the whole time, but effectively he has; we try to ignore the time he wasn’t here. So he knows that opportunity is there.”

Whatever does end up being the final decision for Nash and the Phoenix franchise, it doesn’t appear that it will come at any time before the end of the season. That could all change, of course, should Nash wake up one day and tell the organization that he’s decided not to come back and wants to be traded, in which case the team would certainly start listening to offers. But for now, both Nash and Babby seem content to let the season play out, and not talk about what the future may or may not hold until it’s absolutely necessary.

“We’re coming to the end of a cycle, we understand that,” Babby said. “But hopefully he and I together will succeed and avoid allowing this to become any kind of a distraction, because that’s not fair to the team and I’m really going to do everything I can to avoid that. “

NBA Season Preview: Los Angeles Clippers

Eric Bledsoe, Chris Paul

Last season: 32-50, or to frame it in context, 13th place in the West out of 15 teams.

Head Coach: Vinny Del Negro, who, after the team successfully traded for Chris Paul, is now officially on the hot seat. VDN has yet to prove he can be successful coaching at the NBA level, and if this season doesn’t end with (at minimum) a trip to the playoffs, he could very well be gone this summer.

Key Departures: Eric Gordon, Chris Kaman, Al-Farouq Aminu, Minnesota’s unprotected 2012 first round draft pick.

Key Additions: The league’s best point guard in Chris Paul, Caron Butler, and Chauncey Billups, who was claimed off of amnesty waiver and may or may not stick around in L.A. now that the deal for Paul has been completed.

Best case scenario: One could easily make the case that the best case scenario for the Clippers has already taken place, even before a single game has been played yet this season. L.A. is now more relevant than ever with the acquisition of Chris Paul, and we’re talking about a team that had a considerable buzz around it last season with the above-the-rim play of then-rookie Blake Griffin. Moreover, we’re talking about a franchise that has overall been the league’s worst for decades, and this is their one shot to lay claim to a large section of Los Angeles basketball fans.

For that to happen: The buzz and excitement surrounding the Clippers will fade quickly in Los Angeles if the team isn’t winning and can’t produce runs deep into the postseason sometime in the next few years. L.A.’s fans have been spoiled by the gaudy success from the Lakers over the years, and will only put up with a “fun” team that doesn’t win for so long.

That being said, it doesn’t have to happen this season. But what does have to happen is the Clippers making the playoffs — they simply can’t screw this up. The team should be a virtual lock to take the place of Paul’s former New Orleans team that played in the postseason last year, and a quick look at the offseason moves that other teams in the West made (or didn’t make) would lead you to believe that L.A. with Paul should finish higher than the rest of the teams in the conference that finished out of the playoffs.

More likely the Clippers will: Find a way to screw this up, because historically they always have? Not this time, at least not this season. There are depth issues in all areas but guard for the Clippers, so if health becomes a factor for any of the team’s big names, they may struggle to make the playoffs. But injuries aren’t something you can predict, and analysts always begin any bold statements with “if they stay healthy …” for a reason.

There will be a lot of pressure on the Clippers front office to put pieces around Paul to enable the team to compete with the big names in the West, but that’s a season or two away. For now, the Clips are relevant, and all they need to do is make it into the first round of the playoffs to keep that momentum going into next season.

Prediction: 37-29, seventh seed in the Western Conference.

NBA Season Preview: Los Angeles Lakers


Last season: 57-25, second seed in the Western Conference playoffs. The trip to the postseason was shorter than usual for the then-back-to-back defending champs, as they were unceremoniously swept out of the second round by the eventual champion Mavericks.

Head Coach: Mike Brown takes the helm in his first season with the Lakers after Phil Jackson finished 11 in Los Angeles, going to the finals seven times during that span and winning five NBA titles. Brown of course has the experience of coaching a team led by one of the league’s best players, as he was the man in Cleveland responsible for guiding LeBron James and company to the best regular season record in the league a couple of times, along with a trip to the NBA Finals.

Key Departures: Lamar Odom was traded away to the defending champion Mavericks, after the deal that would have brought Chris Paul to the Lakers was vetoed by the league office. Odom was hurt by this, and immediately requested a trade. And for some reason, the Lakers decided to immediately grant this request. Someone might have wanted to remind the Lakers’ front office that just because a player asks to be traded, you don’t have to give him away for nothing just to appease him. If that were the case, Kobe Bryant would have been gone in the summer of 2007.

Oh, and Shannon Brown signed a one-year deal in Phoenix as a free agent.

Key Additions: Does a Traded Player Exception count? Because that’s what the Lakers received from Dallas in return for the league’s reigning Sixth Man of the Year. If you’re looking for actual bodies that L.A. added, then we have Josh McRoberts and Jason Kapono — both of whom are substantially worse than the departed players whose minutes they’ll likely be taking.

Best case scenario: The Lakers were not a team that was completely broken, despite their shortcomings in the playoffs against the Dallas Mavericks. L.A. was gassed after three straight trips to the Finals, and mentally, believing that somehow once the playoffs began that they would magically solve all of the problems that were evident during the regular season wasn’t a great place to be. The Lakers got what they deserved against Dallas, but talent-wise, they were just fine. That’s no longer the case entering this season.

Trading Odom away for nothing more than a traded player exception — collective bargaining agreement jargon for empty salary cap space to acquire somebody else, so, essentially, thin air — is, by itself, a terrible move from the Lakers’ front office. When you add the fact that they gave Odom to the Mavericks, the very team that beat them four straight times in last year’s playoffs, well, on paper, it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.

Now, if that was step one to clearing some cap space to help the Lakers acquire Dwight Howard, then fine. But as of right now, Howard is off the trading block, and the Magic seem content to start the season with him on their roster. At some point, the Magic will likely look to trade Howard, in order to get something in return instead of the nothing they’d receive if he left at the end of the upcoming season as an unrestricted free agent. But with Howard waffling recently on the intensity of his desire to leave Orlando, it’s not a guarantee that he will be traded at all, much less to the Lakers.

Right now, with the loss of Odom and the less than inspiring roster additions that the Lakers have managed to make thus far, the best case for a successful season in Los Angeles — meaning, at minimum, a trip to the Finals — is acquiring Dwight Howard. Short of that, losing depth while helping the defending champs seems like a step or two in the wrong direction, and teams like the Thunder and Grizzlies are as strong as they were last season, if not stronger. Getting out of the West with less talent than before isn’t likely, so really, the Lakers need to pin their hopes on acquiring Howard, while still keeping either Pau Gasol or Andrew Bynum on the roster.

For that to happen: The Magic will have to start slowly, and Howard will need to once again realize that the Magic have failed to provide him with the correct pieces necessary to win not one, not two … well, at least a single NBA championship. With Kobe Bryant waiting in Los Angeles — along with Gasol or Bynum, one of which would have to stay to make it worth the Lakers’ while, at least in the short term — the Lakers should be the preferred option for Howard if and when he should once again tell his current team that he won’t be back next season.

More likely the Lakers will: Begin their descent into mediocrity as Kobe Bryant plays out his final few seasons as angry and disgruntled as ever? Not just yet. But if the current roster is the one the Lakers are forced to go into battle with for the duration of this season, it’s tough to envision them doing much better than a deep trip into the Western Conference playoffs, when successful seasons for this core group of players are measured only by championships.

Prediction: 48-18, third seed in the Western Conference.

David Stern thinks you can get off his back now for the Chris Paul trade

NBA And Players Representatives Meet To Discuss Possible Settlement

The NBA held a conference call Wednesday night to discuss the trade of Chris Paul from the New Orleans Hornets to the Los Angeles Clippers for Eric Gordon, Al-Farouq Aminu, Chris Kaman, and a first-round pick. The call was as much for the league to try and spin the damage control caused by the league’s rejection of the initial Lakers-Rockets-Hornets trade as it was to introduce why this trade went through. The commissioner bantered with reporters wondering how this all went down and why.

Instead of running you through some dry narrative, let’s play a game called “What He Said/What He Meant” in which I take quotes from the most powerful man in the NBA and interpret them. Shall we?

What he said: “I knew we were doing the best thing for New Orleans and that was my job.”

What he meant: “It shouldn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that two guys over 30 and a mid-20’s pick doesn’t help a team rebuild, but apparently it does. Took me about fifteen seconds.”

What he said: “You have to stick with what you think was right. I must confess it wasn’t a lot of fun, but I don’t get paid to have fun.”

What he meant: “I get paid to make other people not have fun. Specifically Dell Demps, Mitch Kupchak and Daryl Morey, apparently. Also, I did think this was right. If you don’t believe me, check your web traffic tomorrow.”

What he said: “Our sole focus was and will remain, until we sell this team, hopefully which will be in first half of 2012, how best to maintain the Hornets, make them as attractive and a competitive as we can and ensure we have a buyer who can keep them in New Orleans.”

What he meant: “Have you seen this draft class? Do you realize how much we’re going to drive this price up when they get two top-ten picks? We’ve already started printing unibrow signs for Anthony Davis. I have to keep them in New Orleans. The lockout, blocking the trade, that’s two strikes. I’m down to my last pitch, here.”

What he said: “I would recommend only to the most hearty with the thickest of skins that they do this.”

What he meant: “Don’t get it twisted, no one is iller than the commish. Tell Prokhorov I said ‘hi.'”


The commissioner is never going to get this off his resume, never going to erase what some consider a black stain on his legacy. But here’s the end result of Stern’s decisions. The Clippers are better, and a premier team in the league. The Hornets have a better shot at rebuilding and starting over. Both sides won.

The Lakers lost, but that’s another story.