Tag: Chris Grant

2012 NBA Draft

Cleveland is very comfortable with Dion Waiters at No. 4


No team has taken as much public heat after the draft as Cleveland — most people considered it a reach to take Dion Waiters, the Syracuse sixth man, at No. 4.

The reviews have been mixed. Sam Amick at Sports Illustrated graded Cleveland’s draft an “A” saying they picked Waiters but a lot of teams were high on him and how he’d fit in the NBA. Kelly Dwyer at Yahoo’s Ball Don’t Lie gave them a “C” saying what they really should get is an incomplete because we don’t know enough about Waiters yet. I gave them a “D” because I’m simply not as high on Waiters, but I also will admit that they were not alone in liking him. Incomplete would be a good grade.

The Cleveland front office? They were ecstatic with the pick.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN was embedded with the Cavaliers front office on Thursday night and filed a must-read story about how things went down. The Waiters pick may have been a surprise to you and me, but it didn’t them.

By Thursday night, it was down to about four (players they might pick at No. 4). There were numerous opinions and each scout and coach had slightly different lists. But it was pretty clear there were two names at the top once everything had been culled: Michael Kidd-Gilchrist of Kentucky and Dion Waiters of Syracuse….

The reaction in the Cavs’ draft room couldn’t have been more different (than in the public). They had just taken the player they had rated highest who was still available. That included team owner Dan Gilbert, who fully supported the decision. Every pick has risk but the Cavs felt Waiters had emerged as their selection because of how their process worked, not because they wanted to pull a surprise.

“This was the right fit for our team,” (Cavs GM Chris) Grant said several times, including to the local media at a news conference after the draft.

How does Byron Scott feel about all this?

“I was very excited his name was still on the board at No. 4,” Scott said. “I think we got a steal.”

We’ll see.

It’s the nature of the draft that things are unknown, that there are risks with every pick. Some of the best GMs don’t follow the consensus.

But Cleveland has bet its turnaround on making good picks. They aced it with Kyrie Irving (although that was a straight forward call) but the book is still out on Tristan Thompson and now Dion Waiters. When you try to rebuild through the draft like this you can’t really miss.

For some of us, Waiters felt like a miss. They see it differently. Time will decide who is right. But Cleveland really can’t afford to swing and miss much.

Cleveland open to making another deal before the lockout officially begins

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At midnight tonight (or tomorrow, if you really want to be difficult), the NBA world as we know it will come to a grinding halt. Contact between players and teams will be reduced solely to a negotiative process that will determine the league’s short and long-term future, and all of the other off-season festivities — free agency, the summer trade market, Summer League — will be scrapped or delayed until all collective bargaining issues are resolved. It’s going to be a long, cold, lonely summer.

But in the meantime, the Cleveland Cavaliers are staying busy. According to Marc Stein of ESPN.com, the Cavs are open to the possibility of making a second trade today before the lockout officially begins. The motivating factor: a $14.6 million traded player exception acquired in the LeBron James sign-and-trade that would be otherwise almost impossible to use given the unique nature of this off-season.

The exception allows the Cavs to take back salary in excess of the the league’s standard trade rules, and though the Cavs don’t have all that many attractive trade chips, they do hold the ability to take on unwanted salary. Chris Grant, the general manager of the Cavs, has been afforded an opportunity to trade a player with a smaller annual salary in exchange for an overpaid one, and in the process perhaps add draft picks or other interesting young pieces. It’s feasible that a team itching to cut salary in anticipation of the collective bargaining agreement to come could take up Cleveland on such an offer, but there hasn’t yet been any indication of serious trade negotiations stemming from the Cavs’ trade exception.

Still, this is our last hope. There are but a few hours left of a real NBA off-season; once the clock strikes 12, it’s all over. This could be the last bit of relevant roster news, and though Cleveland’s reported openness to making a deal tonight may yield no actual transaction, the team’s mindset still grants the possibility of a final potential move before the NBA goes dark.

Cavaliers’ move for the future could easily backfire

Portland Trail Blazers v Los Angeles Clippers

The Cleveland Cavaliers will have another lottery pick with which to establish a young core for the future, but they had better hope that in their trade deadline deal — which netted the Clippers’ Baron Davis and the aforementioned pick for Mo Williams — the only price they pay is measured in salary committed and cap damage. There’s a fundamental danger in trading appraised assets for mere opportunities (draft picks), and though the draft may be the best way for Cleveland to execute a proper rebuild, the decision to acquire Davis in order to add another reasonably high pick in this summer’s draft could end up doing the Cavaliers franchise considerable damage.

The Cavs’ decision to take on considerable salary — which will only clog up their cap space for the next three seasons, eventual buyout or no — in their current state is questionable enough, but the decision to take on the considerable salary of Baron Davis is another issue entirely. Kurt already touched on some of the pitfalls; Davis is largely unmotivated, insists on launching shots he has no business taking, and sees active defense as a mere suggestion. The on-court damage Davis could (and likely will) do to his team is considerable.

That starts with Ramon Sessions, who has undoubtedly been the brightest spot for Cleveland this season. If there’s any piece to build around on the Cavs’ roster it’s Sessions; J.J. Hickson is still far too inconsistent and is lacking as a shot creator and as a defender, and the rest of the pieces in Cleveland are either aging, injured, or underdeveloped. Sessions was all this team had, and now he likely won’t even start for the team that should be his. Acquiring Davis doesn’t necessarily spell the end of Sessions as a Cav, but it certainly makes the idea of a long-term marriage between player and team a bit more tenuous.

But it gets worse. Davis is the kind of player who — due to his personality and contract size — can immobilize a franchise. The combined $28.7 million Davis is owed over the next two seasons is fairly crippling, and while the exchange of massive contracts this season has proven that no player is untradeable, moving such players often requires paying a price of a different kind. When things inevitably get sour with Davis, the Cavs will do their best to find a taker for him, but that task will only get more and more difficult as contracts like Davis’ become increasingly anachronistic. A new collective bargaining agreement is expected to completely do away with deals of that size, and while that doesn’t necessarily make the prospect of moving Davis down the line an impossibility, it makes the proposition much more difficult.

Williams’ deal was much more movable than Davis’ is and will be, and that fact creates a set of problems separate from the impact of the differences in their salary. This is as good as Davis’ value gets. If he’s moved sometime in the next year, the Cavs will likely have to offer incentive to the team that takes him, just as the Clippers did here.

Cleveland cashed in on Williams’ value, and what they received is a chance to draft a player they like and the right to pay Davis exorbitant sums of money for the next three seasons. They gave away an asset for an opportunity in a game that’s stacked against them (stars can certainly come out of the mid-lottery, but it’s not the most likely outcome), and to have an extra pick in what many are calling a particularly weak draft class. That puts a tremendous amount of pressure on Chris Grant to produce with his pair of lottery picks this summer. Only positive ends can justify these means, and anything less would not only mark this trade as a failure, but also make Davis’ price tag even more painful.

Cavs hire former Suns executive David Griffin as head of the basketball side

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Thumbnail image for CAVALIERS_LOGO.pngDavid Griffin has signed on for some rebuilding.

Former Suns executive Griffin has been hired as the new Vice President of Basketball Operations for the Cleveland Cavaliers, according to ESPN.

Griffin left Phoenix with Steve Kerr. He had been the frontrunner to take over as general manager in Denver, when talks reportedly hit a snag over money. Griffin wanted the going rate of about $1 million a year for the GM job, the Nuggets were offering less. Terms of his deal in Cleveland have not been made public.

Griffin will team with General Manager Chris Grant and coach Byron Scott to rebuild the Cavaliers franchise. While there will be a pecking order, what really matters is that all three are on the same page in terms of the kind of team they are trying to build.

Griffin and Grant are both bootstrap guys, people whose first job in an organization was as an intern and they worked their way up the ladder. In theory, that should bode well for what they are trying to build. But rebuilding there is going to take time.

Cleveland's GM has big plans for that big trade exception

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Thumbnail image for CAVALIERS_LOGO.pngWe like to talk about how Cleveland got nothing for LeBron James (and how Denver doesn’t want to go down that road).

But that’s not exactly true. Thanks to a might-as-well-at-this-point sign-and-trade, the Cavaliers are sitting on a $14.5 million trade exception. That means the team can trade for a pretty high-priced player and send very little back in return.

So what is Cleveland going to do with that? The News Herald asked Cleveland General Manager Chris Grant that very question.

“It creates more opportunity,” Grant said. “It’s like having $14.5 million in cap space, except you can’t actually go sign a player with it. You can only sign a player into it. It helps you facilitate trades. If a team is in the luxury tax and they want to get out of it, they might give you an asset to do a deal. Maybe you can’t quite make a deal work because the numbers don’t work, you can use that to put players into a trade. It’s a pretty powerful tool. We’ll be aggressive with it as we go into the season.

“We want to be flexible, strategic and not be emotional,” he said.

Good thing Grant has a powerful tool, because he’s got a lot of work ahead of him.