Tag: Chris Bosh

Indiana Pacers v Miami Heat

Chris Bosh returns to court four months after being sidelined with blood clots on his lung


Chris Bosh was ruled out for the rest of the 2015 season by the Miami Heat back in February, after it was discovered he would need treatment for blood clots on his lung.

Four months later, Bosh has returned to the court.

From Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel:

Bosh has resumed court work for the first time since being sidelined at the February All-Star break due to blood clots on his lung, working Tuesday with coach Erik Spoelstra, assistant coach David Fizdale, among others.

Back from a recent vacation in South America, Bosh has joined others drilling at on the Heat’s practice court, including Shabazz Napier, James Ennis and Hassan Whiteside, with Zoran Dragic recently returning to also join the sessions. …

Bosh’s recent vacation including some hikes at altitude, but his latest work in the gym is believed to not yet involve contact work.

With blood thinners part of Bosh’s treatment, there has been caution with contact drilling.

Miami’s future — with or without Dwyane Wade — looks much brighter if it includes a healthy Chris Bosh.

A consistently underrated All-Star, Bosh improved his game this year when given the added responsibility of helping to carry the load on the offensive end of the floor once LeBron James was gone.

Over the first 44 games of the season, Bosh averaged 21.1 points and seven rebounds in 35.4 minutes per contest.

Draymond Green in 2010: LeBron James ‘know he can’t lead a team to a championship’

Draymond Green, LeBron James

Draymond Green is one of the NBA’s most-colorful personalities.

The Warriors forward speaks his mind, but he has also has more of a filter now that he’s in the league.

When he was still playing for Michigan State, Green tweeted much more harshly – especially about LeBron James (hat tip: Imgur user iah725):

I’d say LeBron led the Heat to championships in 2012 and 2013, but critics like Green might claim LeBron had too much help from Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh. (As if Michael Jordan didn’t have Scottie Pippen and Dennis Rodman; Magic Johnson didn’t have Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and James Worthy; Larry Bird didn’t have Kevin McHale and Robert Parish; etc.).

If LeBron leads the Cavaliers over Green’s Warriors this year, there’d be no doubt left.

Maybe LeBron teaches Green a lesson over the next couple weeks.

(Hopefully, Green has already learned a lesson about about the inappropriateness of using gay slurs like that.)

Report: Heat and Dwyane Wade far apart in contract negotiations, which could lead to his departure

Dwyane Wade; Kentavious Caldwell-Pope

Over the course of a Hall of Fame career, Dwyane Wade has become synonymous with the Miami Heat. He’s made 11 All-Star teams and won three titles with the franchise, winning Finals MVP in 2006. And in doing all of this for the team that drafted him, he’s become one of only a small handful of superstars of his generation who have been tied to only one franchise their entire career. That short list includes Kobe Bryant and the Lakers, Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavericks, Tim Duncan and the Spurs, and…well…that’s basically it.

Now, there are rumblings that the 12-year relationship between Wade and the Heat could come to an end if they can’t agree on a new contract this summer.

From Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald:

The Heat and Dwyane Wade have been discussing potential resolutions of his contract situation and there’s a significant difference in what both parties believe he should be paid for the next three seasons, according to multiple sources.

Though Wade prefers to stay with the Heat, where he has spent his entire 12-year career, he is now open to considering other teams this summer if the Heat does not raise its offer, according to three sources with direct knowledge.

You can see both sides in this dispute. Wade’s health has been a question mark for several years. He’s generally been fantastic when he’s played, even with his knee problems, but he missed 20 games this season and 28 in 2013-14. The Heat, understandably, don’t want to pay him like a max-level superstar at age 33 if they can’t count on him to play close to a full season — in other words, they don’t want to find themselves in a situation like the Lakers have with Kobe Bryant, where his enormous contract is essentially paying him for what he’s done in the past, far beyond him being worth that kind of money today.

On the other side, Wade has been the face of the franchise for 12 years. Even when he agreed to take a backseat to LeBron James during the Big Three era, he was always the more popular player locally. He’s been a fixture in the community in Miami for his entire NBA career. He’s an icon there. And there’s an element of feeling like he’s sacrificed enough for the good of the team over his career. Wade has taken a pay cut on two consecutive contracts: first in 2010, in order to create the cap space to bring in James and Chris Bosh, and again last summer after James left to go back to Cleveland. The Heat maxed out Bosh to prevent him from leaving for Houston in free agency, and Wade signed a two-year, $31 million contract with a player option for 2015-16.

This summer, the Heat want to retain the same flexibility. Goran Dragic is due for a new contract, and he’s made it clear that he wants nothing less than the five-year, $100 million max deal the Heat can offer him. Considering Miami gave up two first-round picks to land him at the trade deadline, they have a high level of motivation to keep him. Going forward, Hassan Whiteside has one year left on his contract before he’s due for a massive pay raise. If he keeps up the level of production he had this season after the Heat picked him up off the scrap heap, there’s no doubt he’s going to get an eight-figure annual salary.

So that leaves Wade, understandably wanting respect from the organization he’s given so much to, but in a tricky place in his career. If he wants an upgrade over the $16.1 million player option he has next season, he might have trouble getting it on the open market. Even with the salary cap set to spike next year when the league’s new TV deal kicks in, it’s hard to see too many teams lining up to give a 33-year-old with a long injury history and declining athleticism max or near-max money. Wade, in his current state, is worth more to the Heat than he is to any other team.

It’s impossible to imagine Wade playing for a team besides the Heat — but then again, it was tough to picture Paul Pierce playing for a team besides the Celtics until he was traded to Brooklyn in 2013. Wade wants to stay in Miami and the Heat want to keep him. It’s just a matter of figuring out a number that both sides can feel good about. That could be tougher than they think.

Rockets had an excellent season. Are they content with that?

Golden State Warriors v Houston Rockets - Game Four

After the Rockets just completed a surprisingly strong season – winning 56 games and reaching the Western Conference finals – their biggest stars were asked about keeping this group together.

“There’s been so many cases to where we could’ve folded, hung our shoes up,” James Harden said. “But they didn’t quit. I think, if you can have those guys around you, you’re going to be successful more than not.”

Howard, given two chances to answer similar questions, was much more vague.

“We just want to win,” Howard said. “I’m all about guys who want to get in there and fight and never give up.”

Put that quote in context with Howard’s comment after Game 3 – “I saw quit from everybody in the arena” – and draw your own conclusions.

Houston had a heck of a season. Houston might turn over large portions of its roster this summer.

These are both valid statements in Daryl Morey’s world.

The Rockets are always tinkering, always looking for edges. Lately, that has meant pursuing a third star – an effort that kicked into overdrive this summer.

But Houston missed on LeBron James, missed on Carmelo Anthony, missed on Chris Bosh, missed on Dirk Nowitzki and missed on Kevin Love.

The Rockets’ fortune didn’t improve from there.

Dwight Howard missed half the regular season due to injury, and Patrick Beverley and Donatas Motiejunas were sidelined the entire postseason.

Yet, Houston still secured the No. 2 seed and won more playoff series than the previous 17 years combined. By any reasonable standard, this season was a resounding success.

The Rockets proved they belong in the West’s second tier with the Clippers and Spurs and maybe the Grizzlies and healthy Trail Blazers. Houston just ran into an all-time juggernaut in the Warriors. Without Golden State in the picture, the Rockets might be on their way to their third championship.

Plenty of teams would love to be in that sub-Warriors group, a Golden State injury or two away from title contention. But I doubt Morey is content to leave his team’s fate in the hands of another team’s medical luck.

After Houston was eliminated Wednesday, the MVP-winning Curry hugged Harden, who placed second in voting.

“All year, dog, you pushed me,” Harden said. “All year.”

The Rockets were the secondary character in the Warriors’ story this year.

And that’s great!

The Rockets traded Jeremy Lin and Omer Asik and declined to match Chandler Parsons’ offer sheet in order to maximize their chances of landing another star. Morey was willing to take a step back this season.

Thanks to Harden, the year was a major step forward.

Houston can go a number of directions from here. Beverley and Josh Smith will be free agents, and Trevor Ariza and Jason Terry were backup options after the Rockets struck out on major free agents.

Morey, due to his nature and how it was created, might be less attached to his roster than any general manager ever has been with a team so successful. If he’s looking for change, he can point to this final loss. Harden had nearly as many turnovers (a playoff-record 13) as points (14), and Howard lost his composure a couple times.

Howard was asked what Kevin McHale told the team afterward.

“To be honest with you, I was zoned out, boss. I was zoned out,” Howard said. “All I heard was, ‘Great job this season.'”

There’s a lot for the Rockets to process, but Howard heard the most important part.

Mitch Kupchak: Lakers “don’t have time” to build through the draft

Mitch Kupchak

In a little over a month, the Lakers will be selecting second overall in the NBA Draft. The player they take, whether it be Jahlil Okafor, Karl-Anthony Towns, D’Angelo Russell or someone else, is someone they will hope to be the post-Kobe Bryant face of the franchise. Beyond that, though, the word is that the Lakers are done trying to slowly acquire talent.

Here’s what GM Mitch Kupchak told Bleacher Report Radio on Sunday about the team’s mindset following two straight years missing the playoffs:

The Lakers are going to have max-level cap space this summer, which they’ll use to chase a top-tier free agent, whether that be Rajon Rondo, Kevin Love or LaMarcus Aldridge. This has been their strategy for the last year: they went hard after Carmelo Anthony last summer and attempted to reach out to LeBron James and Chris Bosh during free agency, although they didn’t get far with either one.

With the Kobe Bryant era drawing to a close (Kupckak reiterated in the same interview that the Lakers are proceeding as though 2015-16 would be Bryant’s final year), the Lakers don’t have a clear direction going forward. They’ll get Julius Randle back from the leg injury that kept him out all but one game of his rookie season, and paired with whoever they take in next month’s draft, that’s a solid young foundation.

But that won’t be enough to win in the crowded Western Conference, at least not for a while. They’ll need to add talent to put around them, and the quickest way to do that is through free agency. After missing the playoffs two years in a row, the historically dominant Lakers are anxious to get back to being relevant.

The Lakers’ hands are also sort of tied when it comes to building through the draft. They still owe next year’s pick to the Sixers, unless it falls in the top three. Even if they wanted to build through the draft, they don’t have any more first-round picks after this year until 2017.

With that said, Kupchak’s “don’t have time” wording is questionable. If it were any other franchise than the Lakers or the Knicks, it would be assumed that the road to contention would take several years of developing talent. But the Lakers pride themselves on being a consistently championship-level organization, and missing the playoffs two years in a row has been tough on them, so their mentality is not going to change.

And if the Lakers get a star free agent, that’s great. But if they don’t, they could be in for another several years of disappointment relative to expectations.