Tag: Chris Bosh

San Antonio Spurs v Miami Heat - Game 7

Heat re-sign Udonis Haslem


Much like Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and LeBron James (if he so decided), when Udonis Haslem opted out of the final year of his contract with the Heat, it wasn’t to pursue options anywhere else.

Haslem left $4.6 million on the table to give his team the flexibility to pay him more money in total over more seasons, while freeing up some additional space in the present to add talent to the roster.

His deal in Miami has now been secured for the next two seasons.

From Brian Windhorst of ESPN.com:

The Miami Heat re-signed longtime forward Udonis Haslem to a new contract Friday.

The team did not announce terms of the deal, but sources told ESPN.com it is for the room midlevel exception of two years and $5.5 million.

Haslem wasn’t going anywhere. He’s played all 11 of his NBA seasons in Miami, and while his on-court role there has diminished in recent years, his veteran leadership is valued by the organization, and he’s been professional enough to maintain his readiness for whenever his number is called.

Report: Rockets would have added Carlos Boozer as a free agent if he cleared amnesty waivers

Chicago Bulls v Indiana Pacers - Game Four

Carlos Boozer has become somewhat of a joke among NBA fans recently, but that has more to do with things like spray-painting his head, yelling “and-1” after seemingly every touch, and the huge contract he had that overpaid him for his level of production.

But Boozer is a serviceable big man who can still produce. Despite the flaws in his game (like being an inefficient shooter and a below-average defender), he still managed to average 13.7 points and 8.3 rebounds in 28.2 minutes per game for the Bulls last season, while starting in all 76 of his regular season appearances. That ability can be of value to plenty of teams who need reliable production off the bench, especially at a relatively low price.

The Lakers decided Boozer was worth $3.25 million for next season, and they weren’t the only team ready to pay him in the event that he ended up clearing amnesty waivers.

From Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

Had Boozer, who was made an amnesty waiver by Chicago this week, not been claimed, the Rockets would have moved in to land him as a free agent.

The Rockets had reason to be confident they would have been his choice, a person with knowledge of their planning said, though they considered it unlikely he would clear the bid process.

The Rockets did not put in a bid for Boozer because to bid, they would have to have cap room.

Houston has had a rough offseason any way you look at it, after swinging for the fences and missing on big name free agents like Carmelo Anthony and Chris Bosh, only to end up losing players of value like Chandler Parsons, Jeremy Lin and Omer Asik while getting little to no return on those outgoing assets.

Boozer would have been a nice piece to add under the circumstances, but like everything else this summer for the Rockets, things just didn’t end up working out as planned.

Rockets sign Ish Smith, whom DeMarcus Cousins called NBA’s fastest player

Phoenix Suns v Houston Rockets

When he wasn’t expressing his dislike for Chris Paul or calling Rajon Rondo the NBA’s best point guard during his interview with Bill Simmons of Grantland, DeMarcus Cousins discussed the league’s fastest player.

Not John Wall.

Not Russell Westbrook.

Ish Smith, Cousins said.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

With Jeremy Lin traded to the Lakers, second-year Isaiah Canaan was the Rockets’ only point guard behind Patrick Beverley. James Harden could handle more minutes on the ball, but Houston still needs point guard depth.

Smith, who has played for six teams in his four NBA seasons, began his career with the Rockets in 2011. He probably had his best season last year, coming off the bench for the Suns. His speed is a weapon, but he can be a bit careless with the ball.

A playoff team would ideally have better options at backup point guard, but after making such a strong push for LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony or Chris Bosh, Houston isn’t positioned to sign higher-caliber reserves. Given their limited resources, the Rockets did alright here.

Dwyane Wade also gets no-trade clause

New York Knicks v Miami Heat

The last time LeBron James left a team, it won 42 fewer games the following season.

I think the Heat will do better than 12-70, but they’re facing a new reality. Even with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh softening the blow, losing LeBron will hurt. Badly.

Just how much it stings will determine whether Pat Riley continues with this path or shakes things up in Miami.

Wade – who calls himself a “#HeatLifer” – is protected against getting shook in such a shakeup.

In addition to Carmelo Anthony, Wade joins Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett and Dirk Nowitzki with no-trade clauses.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Miami’s Dwyane Wade and New York’s Carmelo Anthony are the latest stars to secure a no-trade clause rarely seen in the NBA, according to sources familiar with their new contracts.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN:


By rule, Wade has the ability to approve any trade next season, because he’s on a one-year contract (the player option season doesn’t count until exercised), he’d have full Bird rights after the season and would lose them as a result of the trade. If he approves a trade, he’d have non-Bird rights, and his new team could exceed the cap to re-sign him up to $18 million and could provide just 4.5 raises (as opposed to the maximum salary and 7.5 raises via full Bird rights if he remains with the Heat).

Wade’s no-trade clause becomes particularly useful if he opts in, because he signed just a two-year contract. If he’s traded, he’d have early Bird rights with his new team as opposed to full Bird rights with the Heat. Unless the 2016-17 cap skyrockets north of $86 million – an extreme projection for even those most optimistic about the effect of a new TV deal – having early Bird as opposed to full Bird rights won’t affect Wade’s starting salary that season, but it would prevent him from getting more than 4.5 percent raises.

I don’t think Riley will trade Wade, who’s been the face of the Heat – with couple-season break when he ceded the crown to LeBron – since people realized the shooting guard was carrying Shaquille O’Neal and not the other way around.

But, just in case, Wade has a little security – both financial and his in his ability to remain comfortable in Miami.

Chandler Parsons ‘offended’ by Rockets’ approach to free agency

Oklahoma City Thunder v Houston Rockets

Rockets general manager Daryl Morey deserves plenty of credit for trading for James Harden and signing Dwight Howard. Recognizing a star-to-be (Harden) is not easy, and luring an establish star (Howard) might be even more difficult.

But Morey was never satisfied – not in an era the Celtics won a championship with Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Ray Allen and the Heat took the big-three concept to the next level with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh.

Morey in January, via Ian Thomsen of Sports Illustrated:

“We feel very comfortable that our two top players are what we need to be a championship team,” said Morey. “And we do need someone to step into that third role. We don’t have our third-best player on a championship team yet, and we need one of younger guys to develop into that — or potentially make an addition, whether it be this year or in free agency this offseason.”

Could Parsons be that player? “He’s definitely got the ability to be the third-best player on a championship team,” said Morey. “He’s played like that many times. The tough transition is whether you bring that level every night.”

But Morey didn’t treat Parsons like that third star this summer, declining his team option and letting him leave as a restricted free agent when the Mavericks made a big offer as Houston concentrated on failed bids for LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony and Chris Bosh

Parsons, via Marc J. Spears of Yahoo Sports:

“Honestly, I was offended by the whole process,” Parsons told Yahoo Sports on Monday in a phone interview. “They publicly said that they were going out looking for a third star when I thought they had one right in front of them. I guess that’s just how they viewed me as a player. I don’t think I’ve scratched the surface of where I can be as a player and I think I’m ready for that role.

“You can’t knock them for always trying to get better. [Houston general manager] Daryl Morey is very aggressive, is a genius, a great GM and I have nothing but respect for those guys. And they are looking to make their team better. That’s what they were doing. I just thought I could be that guy that could do that.”

The Rockets could have – and should have – exercised Parsons’ team option and paid him $964,750 next season.

Instead, he’ll make $14,700,000 next season and $46,084,500 over the next three years.

Houston did him a HUGE favor by treating him like this. If that offends Parsons, who is definitely not a star (though is close enough and young enough at 25 to get there), so be it.

More than being offended, he should really write Morey a thank-you note.