Tag: Chauncey Billups

Chauncey Billups, Joe Dumars

Pistons might keep Chauncey Billups around after this season… in the front office


When the Detroit Pistons brought back Chauncey Billups on a two-year contract — $2.5 million a year with a team option on the second year — there were questions about the move in some corners. But in the short term for a growing team, I like it.

Billups doesn’t bring a whole lot on the court any more, but he brings trusted leadership — in what was an increasingly uncomfortable Clippers locker room last season (due to Vinny Del Negro’s quest to appease Chris Paul in hopes of keeping his job) a number of players turned to Billups for advice. He was a go-to guy.

Billups can provide that for Andre Drummond, Greg Monroe, Brandon Knight and the young core of the Pistons. Which is another reason the Pistons may want to keep Billups around beyond this coming season… but maybe not as a player, reports Vincent Ellis of the Detroit Free Press.

Billups has the business savvy and hoops IQ to be a good front office guy someday, if he wants to go that route.

But for at least a year, he’s going to be a leader in uniform. Then we’ll see.

Chauncey Billups: Joe Dumars apologized to me

Chauncey Billups, Joe Dumars

Chauncey Billups and Joe Dumars had a falling out after the latter traded the former to the Nuggets in 2008.

Billups wanted to retire in Detroit, and though his hometown Nuggets weren’t a completely undesirable destination, he just signed a long-term extension with the Pistons.

But those ingredients alone don’t warrant bitterness. Players getting traded is part of the business. Billups, whose ambitions include becoming a general manager, should understand that.

So, it’s still not clear exactly what contributed to the rift, but Tom Friend of ESPN provides some clues:

Though he has been traded three times before, it still stings. At the team hotel, on Nov. 2, Dumars and the coaches are staying right down the hall from him, but no one invites him down for a goodbye chat. Then, on the morning of Nov. 3, before the shootaround, it becomes official: Chauncey to Denver.

He’s going home again, but he calls Piper and tells her it feels bittersweet. “I’ve been through some dark alleys with them dudes, man,” he tells her. “They’re my brothers.”

He begins packing at the team hotel, when there’s a knock on the door. It’s Hamilton and Prince, the trio together one last time. They embrace, cry, laugh and reminisce. They call Ben Wallace, a Cavalier now, and put him on speaker phone. Wallace tells them, “I told you how they are.”

For what it’s worth, Ben Wallace returned to the Pistons after that. Billups and Dumars reconciled at some point in 2012 or earlier, too. Their relationship further healed when Dumars signed Billups earlier this month.

Billups on Dumars, via Vincent Goodwill of The Detroit News:

“I just needed to hear him apologize for how it went down, to kind of stand on it, and he did that,” Billups said. “As a man, I can’t do anything but respect that.

“Because I had to know it was nothing personal, it was what he thought was a good business move. But we had a personal relationship. I forgave Joe for all of that and we moved forward. I’m great.”

This is a side of Dumars that Pistons fans haven’t really seen. As the Pistons have struggled through five straight losing seasons, Dumars has mostly remained in the shadows.

That might be the best course of action for someone who wants to avoid the spotlight – and Dumars, who built the 2004 championship team, certainly doesn’t owe any fans an apology – but Dumars’ approach also leaves fans feeling disconnected. A little forthrightness with the public could go a long way in repairing the Pistons’ reputation in an area where people have limited disposable income and other options how to spend it, just as it helped repair Dumars’ relationship with Billups.

Dumars has made mistakes, with Billups and with building a winning team. Billups appreciated Dumars admitting that, and fans would, too.

Of course, more than anything else, fans would appreciate a winner. Maybe Billups’ arrival will help the Pistons become one, and then nobody would mind Dumars remaining behind the scenes.

Chauncey Billups: I expect to start at point guard for Pistons

Chauncey Billups, Joe Dumars

Brandon Knight has started at point guard the last two seasons for the Pistons, though he hasn’t played particularly well. Rodney Stuckey started at the position the two years prior, again struggling as a playmaker, which is why Knight replaced him. Before that, Chauncey Billups manned the position for seven seasons, doing an exceptional job, but that run ended back when Billups was 32.

All in all, the Pistons have the last 11 years’ worth of their starting point guards on the roster now.

Ryan Slocum of ABC 12:

There is a whole range of ways to take that.

Joe Dumars could have told Billups outright he’d start at point guard when Billups signed with Detroit.

Dumars could have told Billups, a smart player who can undoubtedly see what’s happened to the position since he was traded to the Nuggets, he’d have a good chance to start at point guard. Billups also could have inferred that on his own.

Billups could just be taking a competitive approach, regardless of the odds. Knight probably expects to start at point guard, too.

Of course, how they get there matters much less than how each player will react to his eventual role. At least in part, the Pistons signed the 36-year-old Billups to mentor the 21-year-old Knight. A feud between those two would be disastrously counterproductive.

However, I’d call that extremely unlikely. Knight and Billups have acted like true pros while in the league, and a little competition should bring out the best in each. Besides, my too-early prediction: Knight and Billups start together in Detroit’s backcourt on opening day.

Pistons won’t amnesty Charlie Villanueva

Charlie Villanueva

The Pistons already made their big move – signing Josh Smith – and their small moves (signing Chauncey Billups and Luigi Datome and re-signing Will Bynum). They might still have a little cap room left to make another small signing, but they’re already over the roster limit including their draft picks, so adding the caliber of player likely available with so little money probably won’t get them anywhere.

Of course, they could pursue one of the better free agents available – Jeff Teague? – if they amnestied Charlie Villanueva and the one year and $8.58 million left on his contract. But the Pistons won’t amnesty Villanueva, according to David Aldridge of NBA.com.*

The news will probably disappoint Pistons fans, who’ve watched their team fall from atop the Eastern Conference to completely out of the playoffs in Villanueva’s four Detroit seasons. That’s not all Villanueva’s fault, but his lackluster defense and rebounding – when he’s even able to get on the court – don’t have anyone wanting to give him the benefit of the doubt.

The Pistons might have declined to use the amnesty to save owner Tom Gores money, because if they’d amnestied Villanueva and signed a replacement, Gores would have to pay two players to fill one roster spot.

But it’s also possible the Pistons want Villanueva’s contract to use in a trade, where it could allow them to accept up to $12.97 million in return. If Villanueva isn’t amnestied, the Pistons could take back only the amount of money they’re under the cap plus $100,000 – surely a lower figure.

So, though Pistons fans might be unhappy today, they’ll surely change their tune if Villanueva’s contract helps them land Rudy Gay or Rajon Rondo. More likely, Villanueva will spend most of the season on Detroit’s bench, look good in one small stretch of the year and then ride off into the sunset free agency next summer.

*Aldridge also added the Pistons are wary of falling below the team salary floor ($52,811,000), but he later correctly clarified that any amount the Pistons pay Villanueva next season, even if Villanueva is amnestied, would still count toward the floor.

Report: Chauncey Billups agrees to two-year deal to return to the Pistons

billups pistons

Four years after being traded away from the team he led to an NBA title back in 2004, Chauncey Billups has agreed to return home.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports:

Chauncey Billups has reached agreement on a two-year contract to return to the Detroit Pistons, league sources told Yahoo! Sports.

The deal will be worth $5 million-plus for Billups, league sources said.

Billups, 36, hopes to finish his career where it blossomed in the glory years of the Billups-Richard Hamilton-Ben Wallace Pistons of the mid-2000s. Billups will play the part of mentor for young Detroit guard Brandon Knight, and be a rotation guard off the bench for Detroit.

Billups played for the Pistons from 2002 through the middle of the 2008-09 season, before being traded to the Nuggets as part of the ill-fated deal that brought Allen Iverson to Detroit. He was an instrumental piece for the team during its incredible run that saw the Pistons reach the Eastern Conference Finals six straight seasons, which included two trips to the NBA Finals and winning the title in 2004.

The last two seasons Billups was with the Clippers, but injuries limited him to playing in just 42 total games. Billups has played 16 NBA seasons, and holds career averages of 15.4 points and 5.5 assists per game.