Tag: Chauncey Billups

Joe Dumars

Pistons officially done with Joe Dumars as general manager


Chauncey Billups, Richard Hamilton, Tayshaun Prince, Ben Wallace, Rasheed Wallace, Greg Monroe, Andre Drummond, Rick Carlisle, Larry Brown.

Mateen Cleaves, Rodney White, Darko Milicic, Ben Gordon, Charlie Villanueva, Josh Smith, Michael Curry, John Kuester, Maurice Cheeks.

In 14 years as the Pistons’ general manager, Joe Dumars has made some great and terrible moves.

In the long run, he’ll be remembered more for the positives, especially the ones that culminated in Detroit’s 2004 championship. But for now, the negatives take precedence.

Pistons team release:

The Detroit Pistons announced today that Joe Dumars will step aside as President of Basketball Operations, effective immediately. The team has launched a search for a new head of basketball operations.

“Joe Dumars is a great champion who has meant so much to this franchise and this community,” said Pistons owner Tom Gores. “We are turning the page with great respect for what he has accomplished not only as a player and a front office executive, but as a person who has represented this team and the NBA with extraordinary dignity.”

During the transition, Director of Basketball Operations Ken Catanella and Assistant General Manager George David will continue preparing for the upcoming NBA Draft and free agency signing period, reporting to ownership executives Phil Norment and Bob Wentworth. Mr. Norment said the organization has developed a preliminary list of candidates that includes “the best executives in the business,” but he declined to place a specific timetable on selecting a replacement.

Mr. Dumars will continue his relationship with the franchise as an advisor to the organization and its ownership team.

“It’s time to turn the page on a wonderful chapter and begin writing a new one,” Dumars said. “I’ve had the pleasure of working with some great people throughout the last 29 years as both a player and executive, and I’m proud of our accomplishments. Tom Gores and ownership is committed to winning and they will continue to move the franchise forward.”

This has the makeup of a mutual parting, and credit Dumars and Tom Gores for making it as clean as possible – especially when a franchise great is involved. But the Pistons are absolutely choosing to go forward without Dumars. Everything else is just window dressing.

Dumars’ misses have become more common lately, and the Pistons’ five-season playoff drought has become too large to ignore. He’s been failing for a while, and while his struggles are not independent of others within the organization, the search for excuses had to end. Dumars was too much part of the problem to remain in his current role.

Considering Dumars’ contract expires in a month and a half, this move can be made without using the ugly term “fired.” But dwelling on that detail misses the real point: Gores doesn’t want Dumars to run his franchise anymore.

Dumars had a great run, but it’s in the past. The Pistons need to move on, and they are.

Report: Joe Dumars to resign as Pistons general manager

Joe Dumars Introduces Josh Smith

Joe Dumars is the NBA’s longest-tenured general manager.

He’s one of just six active general managers – along with Pat Riley, Donnie Nelson, Mitch Kupchak, Danny Ainge and R.C. Buford – who’ve won an NBA championship in that role.

And he’s soon to be out work.

Vincent Goodwill of The Detroit News:

Dumars has told multiple sources within the NBA that he plans to resign — possibly as soon as this week

Dumars became the Pistons’ president of basketball operations in 2000, tasked primarily with re-signing Grant Hill.

It didn’t work.

Hill spurned Detroit for the Magic, leaving Dumars to pick up the pieces just months into the job. Dumars settled for a free agent role player named Ben Wallace, ultimately acquiring him in a joint sign-and-trade for Hill.

Next, Dumars ridded the roster of its hefty contracts, creating flexibility. But the moves cost the Pistons on the court, and they lost 50 games in his first season.

Then, Dumars’ reputation rose meteorically as he took the Pistons to new heights.

Dumars acquired overlooked assets, forming a hard-working team that won 50 games under Rick Carlisle’s leadership and defensive system. The Pistons won a playoff series for the first time since the Bad Boys, when Dumars still played.

He took chances, turning over the roster from scrappy to talented. In came Chauncey Billups, Richard Hamilton, Tayshaun Prince and Rasheed Wallace. Larry Brown, already a Hall of Famer, became head coach. Considering the Pistons had just surpassed any expectations, the talent influx was daring.

One of Dumars’ most-conventional moves in this period was drafting Darko Milicic No. 2 overall in 2003. Nearly every NBA team would have drafted Darko in that situation, but obviously it remains one of the biggest blemishes on Dumars’ record.

Detroit won the 2004 championship, reached Game 7 of the NBA Finals the next season and reached six straight conference finals in all. It was a historically great run.

Then, almost as suddenly, Dumars deconstructed everything he had going.

He traded Billups for Allen Iverson, practically gave away Arron Afflalo and Amir Johnson, signed Ben Gordon and Charlie Villanueva to big contracts, traded a potentially valuable first rounder to dump Gordon a year early and then used the money on Josh Smith. His latest coaching hires – Maurice Cheeks, Lawrence Frank, John Kuester and Michael Curry – all flopped. The Pistons haven’t won a playoff game in six years.

Along the way, Dumars drafted Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe, giving the Pistons real hope to rebuild – hope that still exists. But under new owner Tom Gores, rebuilding was never the goal. Gores wanted to reach the postseason, and Dumars failed to deliver.

That’s why he’s on his way out, whether it’s this week or when the regular season ends next week. Dumars’ contract expires after the season, and ever since Gores stepped over Dumars to fire Cheeks mid-season, it’s been apparent this would be Dumars’ final year with the Pistons.

Whether it’s framed as a resignation, mutual parting or ownership-mandated change doesn’t really matter. Change is happening.

Dumars’ championship and remarkable run as an executive should have gotten him a long leash, and it did. His glory days as a Pistons player probably gave him even more leeway, which is not a courtesy that needed to be extended.

But time has, justifiably, run out. Few general managers would have survived the mistakes Dumars has made the last few years, and now he won’t.

Now, it’s just a matter of it becoming official.

Kyle Lowry regrets how he handled time with Houston Rockets

Dwight Howard, Kyle Lowry

Kyle Lowry ranks sixth in the NBA in win shares. He’s averaging 17.3 points, 7.8 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 1.6 steals per game. He’s led the Raptors to the East’s third-best record.

He darn well should have been an All-Star.

But All-Star reserves are chosen by coaches, and coaches generally don’t like Lowry. He all too often has made life difficult for them.

That was particularly true after the Rockets replaced Rick Adelman with Kevin McHale, when Lowry played for the Rockets.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Looking back, the unraveling under McHale still festers with Lowry. He wishes he had been smarter, surer of himself, less combative in carving out his turf in the NBA. He wishes he had grown up sooner. For Lowry, reaching peace with these revelations gave him the chance to change everything with the Raptors.

“I would have done things differently in Houston,” Lowry says. “I really respected Kevin McHale. I wish I would have had an opportunity to play for him longer. The things he was teaching me, well, I didn’t understand right away. When you get away from someone, though, see it from the outside looking in, you go back and think, ‘Damn, I could’ve learned some more things from the guy.’

“I wanted to stay with Coach Adelman and needed to get over that. [McHale] came in with a different philosophy, and I wish I could’ve adapted to it quicker.”

“He never gave the coaching staff a chance,” assistant coach Kelvin Sampson told Yahoo Sports. “He wouldn’t let Kevin coach him. Kyle’s greatest strength is the bulldog in him, and when that bulldog is channeled the in right direction, he’s tough to handle on the floor. And when it isn’t, he’s tough to handle everywhere else.”

Before last season, the Rockets traded Lowry to Toronto, where he’s blossomed. As Wojnarowski lays out, Lowry has a lengthy list of people who’ve had strong influences on him:

  • Massai Ujiri
  • Chauncey Billups
  • Daryl Morey
  • Sam Hinkie
  • Lowry’s 2-year-old son

It’s taken a while, but Lowry is finally channeling his competitiveness into more productive forms. Credit goes to everyone on that list, but most of all to Lowry. Reading Wojnarowski’s article, it’s clear Lowry has taken to heart how he must change.

Maybe this all a contract-year façade, a salary-driven excuse for temporarily keeping Lowry on his best behavior. But I want to believe Lowry has genuinely transformed himself. It would be a real success story.