Tag: Chauncey Billups

Brooklyn Nets v Miami Heat - Game 5

Shane Battier wins NBA Teammate of the Year award


This award has meaning for the players because it is voted on by their peers — NBA players vote on the teammate award.

They chose Miami’s Shane Battier.

He won the second Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year award.

The 13-year NBA veteran is a guy Miami Heat coach Eric Spoelstra called “the ultimate teammate.” Battier plays a shifting role with Miami, but does stays ready, doesn’t complain and helps talk teammates through what he sees and where they can attack and make plays. You’d be hard pressed to find someone better liked in a locker room.

“It is a huge honor. It’s probably one of the biggest honors of my life. It means a lot to me, I’ve tried to be a good teammate my entire life,” Battier said, as reported by the Heat.

It’s a fitting tribute to Battier, in what likely is his last NBA season.

The award is named after Jack Twyman and Maurice Stokes, who were friends and teammates on the Rochester/Cincinnati Royals from 1955 to 1958. At the end of the 1958 season, Stokes suffered an on-court head injury severe enough to send him into a coma for days. He awoke paralyzed and suffer post-traumatic encephalopathy, a brain injury that damaged his motor-control center. For the rest of his life Twyman took care of Stokes, cared for him and became his legal guardian.

Battier is only the second winner of this award, the inaugural one went to Chauncey Billups. Players vote for one of a dozen players chosen by a list of retired NBA players.

Here is a breakdown of the voting (with first place votes, total points):

Shane Battier, Miami (67) , 1,322
Al Jefferson, Charlotte (29), 798
Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas (28), 784
Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers (40), 754
Pau Gasol, L.A. Lakers (36), 753
Manu Ginobili, San Antonio (14), 739
Channing Frye, Phoenix (24), 568
Andre Iguodala, Golden State (19), 552
Jameer Nelson, Orlando (16), 546
Elton Brand, Atlanta (11), 452
David West, Indiana (16), 447
Mike Dunleavy, Chicago (10), 345

Mark Jackson: Clippers fans should boycott Game 5 due to Donald Sterling allegations

Mark Jackson

Mark Jackson appeared on the Dan Patrick Show, and Patrick asked the Warriors coach whether he could coach the Clippers if Donald Sterling remained the team’s owner. Jackson:

I cannot be the head coach of the Clippers. Like I said, there’d have to be some dialogue. I believe that people can be changed and healed and saved and delivered. It’d have to be some dialogue, and it’d have to be a process with him wanting him wanting to change his thought process and his beliefs. But as it is right now, I could not coach for him.

Patrick also asked how the players should respond to the allegations:

People probably pressured and said the Clippers should boycott and all that. I didn’t agree with that at all. At the end of the day, you’ve got some young, successful guys that dreamed of playing at this level. You’ve got a coach that dreamed of coaching at this level. And they’re being paid very well to do it.

If I were a fan – I’m being paid. Now I’m paying to watch – I wouldn’t show up to the Staples Center. In an ideal world, I’d prefer the Clippers and the Warriors play in the Staples Center with no fans. That made a statement. That speaks volumes. It could be on TV, and we could treat it like it’s normal, but I think it would make a heck of a statement saying you won’t tolerate what was allegedly said.

To everyone telling the Clippers’ players, coaches and fans what to do – shut up.

It’s so easy to give those directions when you don’t have to take the downside of them.

But try being in those shoes. It’s not so easy. These are extraordinary circumstances. There’s no roadmap for how to respond here.

Jackson’s response on coaching the Clippers bothers me, because he doesn’t have to make that choice. Doc Rivers has a nice salary, front-office control and a championship-caliber team. He’s supposed to throw all that away because Sterling allegedly said something racist? That’s a judgment Rivers should make for himself, because he’s the only person in position to do so. It’s completely unfair for Jackson to apply peer pressure for a certain outcome.

But Jackson’s suggestion for fans is even worse, because it would benefit him directly by removing Golden State’s homecourt disadvantage in this series.

Do I think Jackson is being purposefully self-serving? No, though I won’t completely rule it out. But that his suggestion helps the Warriors must be taken into account.

It’s not a money thing. Those Game 5 tickets are already sold. Sterling is getting that cash.

Why didn’t Jackson advocate a fan boycott of Game 4 in Oakland? That would have sent a message, and like Game 5, not affect the gate revenue for any owner.

Jackson is pushing a principled stance of boycotting – one he’s strongly opposed to for his role in participating in the game – when he doesn’t have to eat his tickets. Playoff tickets don’t come cheap, and I’m sure many fans want to support the players and Rivers. Whether going to the game endorses Sterling is a judgment fans must make for themselves, because they’re the only ones in position to do it.

At least Jackson wasn’t scolding the Clippers’ players for not boycotting. You can find that plenty of other places, though.

Everyone – including Jackson, Chauncey Billups, Jalen Rose, George Hill and Jerryd Bayless – is entitled to their opinion. But they’re not in the shoes of the people they’re speaking for.

The Clippers’ players, coaches and fans are doing the best they can. I have no clue what they should do, and I suspect many of them don’t, either.

It’s so much easier to say what you’d do when you don’t actually have do it. I wish a few more people would acknowledge that before saying what they’d do – because they sure don’t have to follow through.

Team balance: Grizzlies have had it, Thunder have not. It’s key to Game 4, series.

Memphis Grizzlies v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

You don’t win an NBA title without at least one superstar player. Two or three is better. Go all the way back to 1979 and you find just one team that won a ring without one of the 10 best players in the game, usually a couple of them. (That exception is the 2004 Pistons, and they had Chauncey Billups playing at that level for a stretch, plus a superstar defense.)

But you also can’t win a title without a good supporting cast playing well around those superstars.

The latter issue is why the Thunder enter Saturday night’s Game 4 trailing the Grizzlies 2-1 and making this game almost must win. Team balance and alternate scoring options have been at the heart of this series — Memphis has had that, the Thunder have not.

With two of the game’s top 10 players in Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook, the Thunder have the superstar players they need. The Grizzlies have countered with two very good perimeter defenders — Mike Conley and Tony Allen — plus a team defense led by Marc Gasol the Grizzlies can take away the first offensive option, they can make life difficult for Durant and Westbrook — in Game 3 Westbrook and Durant scored a combined 60 points but shot a combined 34 percent and were 4-of-21 from three.

In the last two games, Thunder players not names Westbrook or Durant have shot 39.4 percent and made a total of 28 shots. Serge Ibaka has been in double figures scoring both games (12 and 15) and he’s the only other one.

Without a reliable third option (remember late in games the year they went to the Finals the ball was often in James Harden’s hands and he created for everyone else) the Thunder offense has become a “you take a turn then I take a turn” trade off between Durant and Westbrook. They still put up numbers but the Thunder are not the same offensive juggernaut.

The Grizzlies on the other hand have balance.

Oklahoma City has rightfully focused on slowing Conley, Gasol and Zach Randolph on offense — but others have stepped up. Tony Allen had 16 points, Beno Udrih 12 and Courtney Lee 10 on Thursday night in Memphis. In Game 2 Lee and Udrih combined for 30 points.

The Grizzlies are disciplined and making the extra pass to the open man. They are moving the ball side-to-side well, which is allowing Randolph to seal his man and get the ball in deep for good looks.

The Grizzlies have balance and are using it well.

The Thunder has not had that balance. If they don’t have it they might still win Game 4 — Durant and Westbrook can carry a team a long way — but it is the playoff flaw that will ultimately doom them. Much earlier than they had planned.

Thursday And-1 Links: Tracy McGrady makes minor league baseball roster as pitcher

Tracy McGrady

Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• Tracy McGrady is a professional baseball player. A pitcher nonetheless. He made the roster of the Sugar Land Skeeters, an independent minor league team. Give the man some credit, with his NBA days over and not wanting to just collect checks in China (or wherever) he chased a dream and got it.

• When Joakim Noah first came into the league, he wore the same shoe company that his father the legendary tennis player wore — Le Coq Sportif. Now Noah is suing Le Coq Sportif for money and claiming that those shoes helped lead to his foot problems.

• I’ll add that trainers/player development people around the league will tell you a chunk (not all but some) of the plantar fasciitis is about ill-fitting shoes.

• If you want to know now the names and backgrounds of the assistant coaches who will be interviewing for head coaching gigs this summer, read this.

• Terrence Jones had his criminal charges in Portland dropped (for allegedly kicking a homeless man), but a civil compromise was reached.

• The Miami Heat have reached a new deal with the city of Miami to keep the team there through 2040. By then LeBron James will probably own the team.

• Chauncey Billups wants a front office job.

• Here’s a Q&A with The Logo, Jerry West.

• Mark Cuban says the $550 million price tag for the Milwaukee Bucks is a “bargain.” I think he and I define that word differently.

• Gregg Popovich donated money to help Butler rebuild it’s facilities. Because he’s a Hoosier.

• This is old but in case you missed it, here is NBA.com’s Lang Whitaker being a D-League coach.

• Also old but still funny: Can the Portland Trail Blazers name all four Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles?

• You had to know the Miami Heat had a senior dance team, right?

• Finally, I leave you with this from Lance Stephenson, and without comment.

Pistons officially done with Joe Dumars as general manager

Joe Dumars

Chauncey Billups, Richard Hamilton, Tayshaun Prince, Ben Wallace, Rasheed Wallace, Greg Monroe, Andre Drummond, Rick Carlisle, Larry Brown.

Mateen Cleaves, Rodney White, Darko Milicic, Ben Gordon, Charlie Villanueva, Josh Smith, Michael Curry, John Kuester, Maurice Cheeks.

In 14 years as the Pistons’ general manager, Joe Dumars has made some great and terrible moves.

In the long run, he’ll be remembered more for the positives, especially the ones that culminated in Detroit’s 2004 championship. But for now, the negatives take precedence.

Pistons team release:

The Detroit Pistons announced today that Joe Dumars will step aside as President of Basketball Operations, effective immediately. The team has launched a search for a new head of basketball operations.

“Joe Dumars is a great champion who has meant so much to this franchise and this community,” said Pistons owner Tom Gores. “We are turning the page with great respect for what he has accomplished not only as a player and a front office executive, but as a person who has represented this team and the NBA with extraordinary dignity.”

During the transition, Director of Basketball Operations Ken Catanella and Assistant General Manager George David will continue preparing for the upcoming NBA Draft and free agency signing period, reporting to ownership executives Phil Norment and Bob Wentworth. Mr. Norment said the organization has developed a preliminary list of candidates that includes “the best executives in the business,” but he declined to place a specific timetable on selecting a replacement.

Mr. Dumars will continue his relationship with the franchise as an advisor to the organization and its ownership team.

“It’s time to turn the page on a wonderful chapter and begin writing a new one,” Dumars said. “I’ve had the pleasure of working with some great people throughout the last 29 years as both a player and executive, and I’m proud of our accomplishments. Tom Gores and ownership is committed to winning and they will continue to move the franchise forward.”

This has the makeup of a mutual parting, and credit Dumars and Tom Gores for making it as clean as possible – especially when a franchise great is involved. But the Pistons are absolutely choosing to go forward without Dumars. Everything else is just window dressing.

Dumars’ misses have become more common lately, and the Pistons’ five-season playoff drought has become too large to ignore. He’s been failing for a while, and while his struggles are not independent of others within the organization, the search for excuses had to end. Dumars was too much part of the problem to remain in his current role.

Considering Dumars’ contract expires in a month and a half, this move can be made without using the ugly term “fired.” But dwelling on that detail misses the real point: Gores doesn’t want Dumars to run his franchise anymore.

Dumars had a great run, but it’s in the past. The Pistons need to move on, and they are.