Tag: Chauncey Billups

Andre Drummond

Andre Drummond being leader, getting Pistons rookies into town early

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Andre Drummond, team leader.

It’s just his second season and Detroit has a locker room with veterans such as Chauncey Billups and Josh Smith, but it has been Drummond reaching out to the Pistons rookies and telling Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Tony Mitchell, and Peyton Siva to come to Detroit early for pre-camp workouts, reports the Pistons official site.

“I got Peyton (Siva) to come to town, Tony’s (Mitchell) coming in the next day or two and Kentavious (Caldwell-Pope), too,” Drummond said. “I’m making sure all the rookies come in. Last year, I was here real early. I’m like, ‘You guys need to get here early. Just because you made it to the league, don’t think you can come back when all the veterans come back.’ ”

Those rookies are going to have to fight for minutes off the bench. The Pistons have assembled an interesting roster — I’m not sold on Smith and Brandon Jennings meshing well — but they have some depth now. The rookies are going to have to earn that run.

And that run starts with conditioning.

After Siva experienced his first brisk workout, he acknowledged to Drummond that he felt winded and was happy to have the six weeks until training camp opens to acclimate.

“And I told him, ‘It’s only going to get worse. As soon as training camp comes, it’s running times 10.’ So I’m glad to have him out here with me and the other rookies will be here soon, too.”

Drummond had an impressive rookie season — if he could have stayed healthy he would have been in the Rookie of the Year conversation (I doubt he wins but in the conversation). Drummond averaged 7.9 points a game on 60.8 percent shooting plus was strong on the boards averaging 7.6 a game. And that was with coach Lawrence Frank seeming to hold the reins on him and not really turning him loose.

But can Drummond sustain a level of play that saw him with a PER of 21.6? Obviously he can’t shoot 37.1 percent of free throws and be productive (he’s working on that) but Tom Ziller at SB Nation tried to temper expectations by saying it is more than that.

I’m skeptical of two pieces that made Drummond’s rookie season so spectacular, though: his elite rebounding and his lack of turnovers. Last season, Drummond snared 15.4 percent of his own team’s missed shots, one of the best marks in the league…. Kenneth Faried is a good example of a player who was extraordinary on the offensive glass as a rookie (16.5 percent) only to dip down to very good in his second season (13 percent). That could happen to Drummond on both ends. (He was an outrageous defensive rebounder, too.)

The most unbelievable thing about Drummond as a rookie was his low turnover rate. He didn’t touch the ball as a threat to score a whole lot, but still. For a young, raw big man to have a turnover rate of 12 percent is totally unexpected and a huge boon. For comparison’s sake, Dwight Howard’s turnover rate has never been lower than 15 percent.

But as Drummond gets better he’s going to draw more attention — from defenders not letting him do what he wants in the post and from teams working to keep him off the boards. It’s not that he will not still be could and could be on his way to being the best center in the league, it’s just a question of how efficent he can continue to be as he draws more attention.

Still, he’s showing signs as a locker room leader already on top of his play. That could make his a special player.

Pistons reveal ‘Motor City’ alternate uniforms


The Pistons have worn red, white and blue uniforms for years and years. It’s become a classic look for one of the NBA’s flagship franchises.

Aside from a brief – and misguided – foray into teal during the 90s, the Pistons have remained true to that color scheme, a point of pride for Detroit fans. Above all, the Teal Era served as a wakeup call so fans stopped taking the red, white and blue for granted. Now, they appreciate those iconic colors even more.

So, the Pistons are venturing slightly outside their comfort zone with this new “Motor City” alternate uniform, which is a significantly darker shade than the Pistons’ typical blue.


Via the Pistons

You can better see the difference in blue with the photo the Pistons released teasing the new uniform:

Another teal mistake? No way.

I really like the new uniforms.

Previously, the Pistons’ alternate jerseys were red, and just for the sake of tradition, I hoped the new ones would remain red. But this is better.

The Pistons play in the suburb of Auburn Hills, but they still represent Detroit, the “Motor City,” and this is a great way to instill that. The jersey is simple and clean, and the font and number styles ensure it fits with the Pistons’ standard two uniforms.

If I have any complaint, it’s the hollow box, with a filled box at the waistline, created by the vertical piping on the side. I think I would have preferred piping that matched their standard road uniform, but the alternates look good from the front as they are, so I could cave.

Also, want an early indicator of the Pistons’ starting lineup?

Greg Monroe, Andre Drummond, Josh Smith and Brandon Jennings will almost certainly start. Maybe Chauncey Billups has an inside track on that fifth spot.

Or maybe the Pistons know the 2004 NBA Finals MVP will sell jerseys, which is really the whole point of this exercise. At least the Pistons are going about it in a very aesthetically pleasing way.

Brandon Jennings says Pistons could become Lob City, pledges to change his game

Brandon Jennings, Joe Dumars

As he sat down for his new conference to introduce Brandon Jennings, Joe Dumars muttered, “Oh my god.”

I don’t know what Dumars was referring to at that moment, but I cant think of a better way to describe the experiment he’s conducting with the Pistons.

Jennings at point guard with Josh Smith, Greg Monroe and Andre Drummond in a supersized front court.

Oh my god.

“We could bring the Lob City to Detroit this year,” Jennings said.

Or they could be a mish-mash of talent, too undeveloped and/or too stubborn to fit together. Or anything between.

Either way, Dumars succeeded in significantly upgrading Detroit’s talent level this summer, a necessary step as he enters the final year of his contract while serving as general manager for an owner whose impatience for making the playoffs is showing. When the Clippers dubbed themselves Lob City, they had championship dreams. The Pistons’ goals are much more modest, merely reaching the postseason after missing it the last four seasons.

That’s a sad state for the Pistons, a franchise with three championships in the last 25 years. The goal in Detroit has never been a title ever year, but challenging to make the playoffs – the way Dumars phrased it today – sounds relatively pathetic.

But after four pathetic seasons – really five, counting a 39-43 year that resulted in an especially lopsided first-round sweep – this is where the Pistons are. It’s too soon to aim higher, but with the talent the Pistons now have, it’s at least possible to see this road leading to, with the absolute right breaks, reasonable discussions of championships.

Jennings, who cited the Pistons’ multiple titles, must understand this, though he brushed off an attempt to tie himself to the Pistons’ previous greatness. Asked about the Bad Boys shirt he wore to the Drew League, Jennings said, “I just liked the shirt. That’s all.”

Dumars, the shooting guard on those 1989 and 1990 championship teams, patted Jennings on the back – a playful threat. The threat to Dumars’ job is a little more real, and he’s hoping for a pat on the back from Pistons owner Tom Gores after the season.

For that to happen, the Pistons probably have to make the playoffs. For that to happen, Jennings probably must refine his game, something most gunners aren’t inclined to do.

“You’re going to see a whole different player,” Jennings said. “…I definitely have to change my game.”


“The things that I was doing in Milwaukee, I won’t have to do here, take all the bad shots,” Jennings said. “Now, I can just actually be myself and be who I was five years ago when I was in high school, playing AAU basketball.”

As he spoke about the need to become a different player, Jennings said, “Of course, I have that chip on my shoulder.”

Again, championship aspirations remain very distant in Detroit. But there’s still a strong connection there with both the Bad Boys – the NBA’s ultimate castoff team – and 2004 championship team, which featured Chauncey Billups (bounced between the Celtics, Raptors, Nuggets, Magic and Timberwolves before finding a home in Detroit), Richard Hamilton (judged by Michael Jordan to lack the proper winning attitude), Tayshaun Prince (fell to No. 23 in the draft despite a standout Kentucky career), Rasheed Wallace (kicked out of Portland for being a bad seed) and Ben Wallace (undrafted and cut by the Celtics).

Did Dumars target players like Smith and Jennings, because they’re viewed as having an edge about themselves?

“We’re not afraid to go down that road,” Dumars said. “That doesn’t dissuade us at all from going up to guys like that. As a matter of fact, we like guys like that.”

Jennings gives the Pistons a better point guard than Brandon Knight, and that’s the most important reason he’s on the team. But Jennings also gives Dumars a chance to save his job with his type type of player. The Pistons have aligned themselves on a course that has worked for them in the past.

Nationally, the Pistons’ season is about really talented players trying to make it work together. Locally, the season is about Dumars’ attempt to keep his job.

Jennings makes both storylines a lot more intriguing.