Tag: Celtics Lakers Game 4

NBA finals, Lakers Celtics Game 4: The Big Baby and Nate show


Here’s a clip from the best press conference of the playoffs — the Big Baby and Nate show. Also Doc Rivers, Paul Pierce, Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson talking about the Celtics bench and their energy.


NBA finals, Lakers Celtics Game 4: If he's going to play like that, Big Baby can drool all he wants


Davis_drool.jpgMake no mistake — Big Baby slobbered. He drooled. Just like a baby. On national television. For all the cameras to catch.

He doesn’t really care. And if he can play like that again in Game 5, the entire city of Boston will drool right along with him. (I think the Southies already do.)

“Let me tell you something right quick,” Glen “Big Baby” Davis said during his stand up routine and post-game press conference with Nate Robinson, televised on NBA TV. “When you’re in the moment, you’re in the moment.  If I slobber, snot, spit, please excuse me.  Kids, don’t do that.  Have manners and things like that.”

Didn’t surprise Doc Rivers.

“I’ve seen that action before. It’s usually after we run in practice,” Rivers said.

Rivers will drool on national television for another performance like that.

Davis provided what Kevin Garnett has not really this series — a strong inside presence to match the Lakers. He had 18 points on 7 of 10 shooting. Davis was matched up on Lamar Odom — since Andrew Bynum was sitting — and just dominated him inside. Davis has the size to just back Odom down, but he is amazingly fleet of foot and athletic for a man his size. You can see where the comparisons to Shaquille O’Neal came from at LSU.

Drool on, Big Baby. Drool on.

Quote of the day, where the Celtics are doing movie promos

Leave a comment

“We’re like Shrek and Donkey.”

–Nate Robinson on him and Glen “Big Baby” Davis.


NBA finals, Lakers Celtics Game 4: Bynum sits, game gets physical and it feels like 2008 again


Davis_Bynum.jpgThese Lakers were different. It’s what we heard, it’s what we saw. These Lakers were not soft, they would not roll over for the Celtics like two years ago. Right? And they didn’t. For three games.

Then Andrew Bynum sat, his knee clearly worse for the wear. Then Game 4 got physical. Then for the first time in the series the referees let the teams play.

Suddenly, if you squinted just a little, it looked like 2008 again. Boston controlled the boards when it counted. Boston played with a real sense of desperation. Glen “Big Baby” Davis was the best big man on the floor — you really have to squint to think he is Kevin Garnett — and the Lakers bigs were pedestrian or worse. Boston was more physical, they pushed the Lakers around and they won Game 4. And the series is tied 2-2.

Needless to say, the Celtics liked the flow of this game.

“Extremely physical game but it was a clean game…” Rivers said. “Both teams were allowed to play. It was a physical game.”

The Lakers were not allowed to play like they wanted, in part because of the aggressive Celtics post defense and in part because they lacked Bynum. He played 12 minutes — six at the start of the game and a couple other three minute runs — but he hobbled and was slow. In the first few minutes he got an offensive rebound right under the basket and tried to go back up — a shot he normally dunks with authority. This time he could barely elevate and Kevin Garnett blocked his layup. It was that kind of night for him.

Bynum said after the game the swelling is the worst it has been, limiting what he can do, but that the pain is about the same. He also said he was disappointed but planned to bounce back for Game 5. (Kobe added they need him to.)

Without Bynum, the matchups switch. They revert to 2008 inside. The very physical Kendrick Perkins gets to cover Pau Gasol (he still had 21 points but just six rebounds) and puts Kevin Garnett on Lamar Odom (he had 10 points and seven boards).

When the benches came in, Davis got matched up on Lamar and just owned him inside. Davis used his strength to get what he wanted. At the other end, the much quicker Odom was hesitant to attack Davis off the dribble until late in the game, when the Lakers got desperate.

The biggest difference was on the glass. Boston grabbed the offensive rebound on 34.8 percent of their missed shots in Game 4. This was not something they were good at during the regular season, grabbing just 22 percent (28th in the league). Tonight they owned it.

Kobe Bryant had a good game — 33 points on 10 of 22 shooting and 6 of 11 threes — but he could not get going late and take over. He also had seven turnovers. Boston is doing a good job forcing him left and having help ready. He was not able to drive the lane as he did in Game 1. His threes heavily contested. He and Gasol also got tired, as Phil Jackson said after the game, which happened because Jackson did not trust his bench.

In Game 5 the Lakers know they need Bynum back. Not the full strength Bynum, they’ll take the one from a week ago.

“We’re glad we have a couple days off to get him back hopefully in a position where he can help us out again” Phil Jackson said.

They will need him. They will need Kobe late. They will need a sense of desperation. Because Boston has won one game in Los Angeles and if they go ahead 3-2 they know they need to win just one more. They are starting to feel like it is 2008 again.

NBA finals, Lakers Celtics Game 4, halftime: Lakers lead after ugly half of basketball

Leave a comment

pierce_blocked.jpgThere comes a point in a seven-game series when the games get ugly. Teams have watched the film, lived the other team for a few games and they now anticipate everything. They know where the next pass is headed, the next cut is going. They can stop things before they happen.

We are there in the NBA finals. The first half of Game 4 was not pretty basketball.

The Lakers lead 45-42 at the half.

At this point it’s about which team can hit the contested shots, which team can win the scrambles. So far the Lakers have gotten good games from who you expect: Kobe Bryant has 12 points (on 5 of 8) and Pau Gasol with 12 (3 of 6).

The Celtics have had Paul Pierce, who has had his best game of the finals, with 12 points on 5 on 9 shooting.

The team that does the little things — wins on the boards, gets the loose balls, hits the tough shots. The Celtics need to play with some desperation and do that; they cannot afford to go down 3-1.