Tag: CBA

Carlos Boozer, Luol Deng

Report: Bulls considering moving Joakim Noah or Luol Deng for pick and cap exception


The Bulls are in a lot of trade conversations, which is kind of weird. The team was the No.1 overall seed in the playoffs despite Rose having missed all that time, and Rose was the number one, no questions asked, absolute reason the Bulls fell to the Sixers. Why would they mess with what’s working so well? But for whatever reason, either their people, or the people they’re talking to, are very chatty right now.

The newest one is a doozy. The New York Daily News reports the Bulls are seeking a trade for Luol Deng or Joakim Noah in exchange for a lottery pick and a trade exception. Yeah. A trade exception. From the NYDN:

The Bulls want to give Omer Asik and Taj Gibson new deals, so they’re exploring ways to trade Luol Deng and/or Joakim Noah to teams that can send them a trade exception and a No. 1 pick.

via After coaching a dynasty with the L.A. Lakers, Pat Riley is looking to do the same as president of the Miami Heat – NY Daily News.

Now, it’s  possible that this is the Bulls’ approach. Here’s why. If Bulls ownership is looking to cut future salary to ensure their ability to get under the luxury tax to avoid the repeater tax in 2015, they can get Asik and Gibson for cheaper deals overall than Deng and Noah. Deng’s got $27 million owed over the next two seasons, Noah is owed $48 million over the next four. Moving either one and having Asik and Gibson could help them keep the core together and avoid the repeater tax, especially if they amnesty Carlos Boozer.

Why would Bulls ownership just eat the Boozer salary in an amnesty situation? Wouldn’t that just equal the repeater penalty? Not necessarily. Remember that once Boozer hits waivers, any team can bid for part of his salary, which comes off what the Bulls have to pay him. Boozer has enough value that you just know a team would make a bid of up to half his remaining salary and still be getting a bargain. That, plus losing Noah and Deng’s money, would give the Bulls an out from the repeater tax, and some flexibility if they want to make another move.

That said… really?

Deng’s a top-five defender in this league, an NBA All-Star who’s shot has been on fire the past two seasons and plays perfectly next to Rose. Noah is a sparkplug center with versatility who you can lean on when someone’s missing or you need a play. You’re going to give that up for the subs and cap relief? It’s hard to believe, but one thing we’ve already seen is the league acting really weird in regards to that repeater tax. The Lakers and Mavericks have both been casting a wary eye towards it.

It could win up reshaping the league, and the Bulls could be a victim. For now, though, throw this one in the “probably not” pile.

Will the new CBA give David Stern less power to punish players?

Ron Artest Parade

TrueHoop’s Henry Abbott suspects that it might:

David Stern has more than a little power, which is especially clear when players really break the rules.

After the unrestrained brawl known as “the Auburn Hills incident,” for example, the fortunes of the Pacers and Pistons franchises and several players hung in the balance. Were there hearings to be had? Was there testimony? Is there a judge or a panel that metes out punishments in such cases? Are there published guidelines?

There is none of that. In that case, and in many other cases, the commissioner essentially has the right to punish players as he sees fit…

…Hunter said a couple of weeks ago that his list of “B” issues runs to six pages of “issues that are very important that we have yet to resolve.”

Asked to name some of the issues on his “B” list Hunter first identified the league’s age limit, and then named just one other: “commissioner discipline.”

We’ve gotten used to swift justice being handed out by the commissioner when players step out of line. While a more democratic process would certainly seem like a good idea in theory, Stern’s first priority is generally damage control, as he is still attempting to get mainstream America to embrace the NBA game the same way they embrace the college game every March.

If swift suspensions aren’t handed down when players run into the stands and start punching people, that goal could become harder to attain. Still, fair is fair, and the argument that Stern has too much power when handing out suspensions has merit to it on an ideological effort. The players may also want the controversial “dress code” revoked — personally, I like seeing players in business clothes when they’re not playing (and it’s often mutually beneficial — how much extra endorsement money do you think Michael Jordan made during his career for suiting up after games), but ultimately the players should get to decide what they want to wear if they’re not playing. And if this lockout agreement blows up because of a hooded sweater impasse, I will actually go insane.

Report: Age limit under review, but could stay the same for 2012

2011 NBA Draft

Among the so-called “B-List Issues” being worked on before a formal vote will be held, the age limit consideration could be the one that impacts the NBA the most and certainly draws the most fan interest. And Yahoo! Sports reports that it’s such a big issue, it may not get resolved right away.

The NBA and Players Association are discussing the formation of a committee to study the age minimum for the league’s draft with the possibility that no immediate changes to the “one-and-done” rule will come in the finalization of the new collective bargaining agreement, a league official told Yahoo! Sports.

“Only the agreement to have the committee may be part of the new CBA,” the source said. “I doubt it will have any affect on e 2012 draft.”

via Committee could study NBA draft rule – NBA – Yahoo! Sports.

That’s good news for players like Anthony Davis, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Quincy Miller, and other freshmen in a loaded class looking to make the jump. It’s also a more fair approach since players may have made their choice on college based on the one-year system (cough* Kentucky* cough). But what’s getting lost in all this is an item towards the end of Woj’s piece which outlines what the real system will likely be. Instead of just a straight “two-and-through” system wherein players must wait two years, it’ll likely be an “18-or-2” system. Under that system, players could jump at 18 to the draft, but if they are undrafted, they can return to college eligibility. From there, they’d have to wait two years. That’s a much better system overall, allowing players who are ready to make the jump immediately (see: Rose, Derrick) while making sure players that aren’t get two full years of seasoning. Imagine how much better Hasheem Thabeet’s career, or at least draft positioning would have been for him under that system.

But that will have to get worked out later. The best news about the committee is that it means this won’t hold up ratifying the new CBA this week. It’s another potential pitfall to the deal that could save the system avoided. Rationality and common sense! Where has this been for six months?