Tag: CBA lockout

NBA lockout Stern Hunter

Collective bargaining talks produce vaguely positive outcome


The lockout drags on, but today NBA fans are given the slightest reason for optimism. Representatives for the NBA players and owners met today for a six-hour bargaining session, and though dialogue in itself isn’t enough to bring back the league we all know and love, the fact that meetings are going on at all does give some reason for optimism.

Howard Beck of the New York Times met reps from both sides on their way out, and offered a few carrots to basketball-starved fans via his Twitter account:

[Derek] Fisher also said parties agreed to dispense with the rhetoric and public shots at each other. All positive signs, IMHO.

Positive indeed. The less talking that goes on outside of the negotiations, the better. Neither side really has much need for posturing at this point; both sides have made their pleas to the public based on the supposed injustices of the other camp, and the patience for that kind of campaigning has grown thin. Fisher’s comments give us reason to believe that that stage in the lockout process has passed, which can only mean good things for the rest of the negotiations. Less bad blood, more hammering out the details of how to bring the NBA back.

More meetings are scheduled, but parties will not specify when and where.

The lack of public transparency in this case is a non-issue. Again, the important thing is that these meetings and dialogues continue to happen. Progress is the key here, even if fans and media members have some difficulty tracing the specific locale of each negotiation. It’s good news that there isn’t just “another meeting,” but another planned meeting that’s actually on the calendar.

Stern and Silver just spoke. Just as cautious as Fisher in assessing progress. But Stern said there is definitely time to make a deal.

The fact that neither side is jumping at a chance to declare real, immediate progress is just fine. It’s important that both parties continue to take the negotiations seriously and consider the timeline of the bargaining period to be pressing, and that sense of urgency doesn’t come without the acknowledgement that there’s still plenty of work to be done. It’d be wonderful if the lockout could be resolved overnight, but the gulf between the players and owners makes that an impossibility. As such, a healthy dose of realism is invaluable for all involved, and that such realism is embedded in the notion that there’s still plenty of negotiating work to be done.

If Shane Battier plays overseas, he’s playing in China

Memphis Grizzlies v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One
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Since Yao Ming entered the NBA (miss you, Big Fella), China has emerged as an untapped market for both the league and its players looking for brand-expansion. The Rockets, in particular, took full advantage of their connections to Yao and cashed in, becoming celebrities as the country started to embrace the game fully. Shane Battier was among those who recognized the potential and has made efforts to make himself a known commodity in the country.

Battier spoke to Sports Illustrated, and when asked about his prospects for playing overseas, made it clear he has one particular place in mind should he head over:

“If I were to play anywhere, I would look at China first because I have some connections there depend,” he said. “It would depend on the tenor of the negotiations and if it looks like well play a season.”

Battier believes more players will be inspired by Deron Williams decision to play in Turkey. “I was proud of him for taking that chance,” he said. “That will be a great experience for him and I would not be surprised if more guys follow suit. But it will be surprising if guys go over there for August training camp [as thats when camps tend to open in Europe]. If it doesnt look like well have the normal exhibition seas and preseason, you could see a bunch of guys go to Europe.”

via Shane Battier has plan in place during NBA lockout – Ian Thomsen – SI.com.

Battier is filling an interesting role in the lockout. He’s one on hand questioning Billy Hunter and the direction of the NBPA’s leadership, which paints him as some sort of rogue, and on the other supporting the players in their efforts and pushing back on ownership.

While Battier’s age and relative lack of stardom limits his European opportunities, in China he’s a known entity. It’s a smart play. We’ll see if Battier winds up making good on those connections.

If there is a lockout, owners could push for entire season to sweep the leg

NBA & NBA Players Association Announce New CBA

From CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger:

In an intriguing if contradictory prediction, the person said that despite a steady stream of lockout rhetoric, he has come to believe that owners and players will reach an agreement and avoid a work stoppage at the 11th hour before the current CBA expires on July 1, 2011. However, if cooler heads do not prevail, the owners will be so entrenched and determined to make a work stoppage pay off that they will push to cancel the entire season to cripple the National Basketball Players Association and implement the drastic changes they are seeking.

Basically, if a lockout is the only way to get the players to cave, then the owners are really going to make them cave. If there’s a lockout, the participant in past negotiations predicted, it will not simply be for show. It will be Armageddon.

via With CBA talks looming, owners committed to spending less – NBA – CBSSports.com Basketball.

Well, that’s happy.

Losing the entire season out of principle would be madness. The damage to the sport in the event of a lockout is severe enough, but losing a whole season would set back the league for a decade. It’s one thing if they can’t come to an agreement, but the owners so far have taken a dangerous position set upon seemingly by braggadocio and not a genuine interest in reaching a resolution. They don’t want to come to an agreement, they just want to win and get their way. That’s been clear in how they’ve approached talks with the union, not even deigning to respond to the players’ latest proposal, which offers a decrease in BRI for the players in exchange for things like an improved revenue sharing system.

Just to be clear here, the players have sent over a proposal saying “we’ll take less money if you’ll make it where more of your teams are competitive and we keep jobs for our players” and the owners won’t even open talks on it. Which has to leave you wondering who exactly is in charge for the owners. David Stern doesn’t want a lockout, it’s bad for his league, and he has been pretty vocal about pushing the directive for  revenue sharing in the interest of improving competition. Glen Taylor (Minnesota and Peter Holt (San Antonio) are allegedly the heads of the owners’ negotiating council, but this reeks of big-market politics being put into play. So who exactly is in charge over there?

The league may wind up losing an entire season simply based on the stubbornness of a few old men who refuse to realize that they’ve already won the fight because they’re concerned with style points. And all the interest in saving a few bucks may be for not if revenues plummet when fans turn their backs on a sport that s’ seemingly run by men with no respect for either the fans, nor the process of true compromise.