Tag: Carmelo Anthony

Utah Jazz v New York Knicks

Utah’s Trey Burke hits shot at the buzzer to send Knicks to seventh straight loss (VIDEO)


NEW YORK — And so it goes for these Knicks.

On a night where Carmelo Anthony was fantastic, and did everything he could to singlehandedly drag his team to a much-needed victory, an incredibly tough shot at the buzzer sent New York reeling into the night with a seventh straight loss.

Trey Burke’s buzzer beater — a step-back long two over a heavily-contesting J.R. Smith — negated Anthony’s 46-point performance, and the Jazz came away with the 102-100 victory to send the Knicks to 2-8 on the young season.

It was an entertaining battle between Anthony and the bulked-up Gordon Hayward, who took plenty of physical punishment as Carmelo got his buckets. Hayward did plenty of damage of his own, standing toe-to-toe with Anthony physically while pouring in 33 points of his own.

But Anthony was determined to leave it all on the floor, and made a focused effort to attack the basket in a way we haven’t seen from the Knicks this season, who have struggled with far too many midrange jumpshots as they try to learn the intricacies of the Triangle Offense.

New York found itself down by three with 16 seconds remaining — plenty of time to go for a quick two points and play the foul game if that’s what they had decided. But Anthony dribbled down the clock, and once he got Derrick Favors defending him after a switch, he let a three-pointer fly from the top right side of the arc that banked home to tie the game at 100 apiece.

Ideally, Jazz head coach Quin Snyder would like to take a foul in that situation, to prevent the tying shot from ever being launched. But when I asked him about it afterward, his reasoning for not doing so in this particular instance seemed to indicate he was surprised by the way the play developed.

“Normally we would foul,” Snyder said. “With nine, seven seconds, depending on whether they have timeouts. Last game it was something we hadn’t really talked about, against Cleveland, and LeBron got us off our feet. Frankly, I didn’t anticipate [Anthony] taking the clock down that long, and we didn’t discuss it as much. We talked about it briefly if it got low, but a that point, with Favors on him, it wasn’t something you want to yell from the bench. And obviously, [Anthony] is one of the guys that can rise up over you, which is why we were switching pick and rolls. We thought Favors could contest the shot, which he did, but the clock went down pretty low.”

The following play was a little more chaotic.

With the Knicks surely believing that Hayward would be the one who the Jazz would try to get the ball to, Utah had Burke as one of the play’s last options. Gordon was heavily-defended, so the ball was inbounded to Burke, who turned, took one dribble to his left, stepped back, and nailed the game-winning shot.

“We just thought Gordon’s been tough to guard, and he would draw some attention,” Snyder said. “And Trey was able to slip out after screening for [Derrick Favors]. Gordon was the focal point. Trey’s a guy that’s been known for hitting big shots. I think he’s one of those guys who gets excited when he gets the ball, and I know Gordon’s been like that too, but Gordon was happy that Trey got the look.”

“I caught it, and J.R. Smith was like, all on me,” Burke said. “And my back was turned away from the basket. I had to kind of spin out of it, and then step back to create some separation to get the shot off, because he’s about 6’5”. I had to think quick, but I knew we needed a shot, or at least a good look — and it looked good as soon as it left my hands.”

PBT’s Wednesday Night NBA Winners/Losers: Davis, Morrow, just good night for anyone named Anthony

Los Angeles Lakers v New Orleans Pelicans

Every night the NBA can be a cold hard reality — there are winners, there are losers. It’s the nature of the game. We know you are busy and can’t keep up with every game, so we’re here to bring you the best and worst of the NBA each week night. Here’s what you missed while spending $24 million on a watch….

source:  Anthony Davis. He’s been the best player in the league so far this young season. Better than LeBron James, better than Chris Bosh, better than Stephen Curry. Davis has a PER of 35.7 so far. At age 21. In his third NBA season. He had 25 points, 12 rebounds and six blocks against the Lakers Wednesday night — and that’s pretty much been a standard night for him. He’s a defensive force, he runs the floor, he’s got a midrange game, there’s not much he can’t do. Oh, and he can dunk, too.

source:  Anthony Morrow. The Thunder need scoring without Durant and Westbrook, and in his second game back Morrow provided it. He had 19 points in the fourth quarter, 28 for the game on 11-of-15 shooting, plus he was 4-of-5 from three. Oh, and the Thunder won, they are now 3-6 on the young season and just trying to keep their heads above water until the cavalry coms charging over the hill next month.

source:  New York Knicks. We all knew there was going to be adjustments to be made: The triangle offense takes time to learn, Derek Fisher is learning on the job as coach, the roster just does not have that much talent on it… but wow they have looked bad during this six-game losing streak. And never worse than in this loss to the Magic on Wednesday night at home. I’ll grant you that J.R. Smith’s last shot was not a wise choice (and not what Fisher drew up, you could see that on Carmelo Anthony’s face) but this loss was more than that. It was some odd player rotations and lineups from Fisher (no Tim Hardaway Jr. in the first half?). It was poor defense again — the Magic scored a high 106.5 points per 100 possessions in this game, but that is still berter than the Knicks season average of 108.4 (25th in the league). I wish I had a bright spot for Knicks fans, but this is going to be a long season.

source:  Paul Millsap. Normally he’d slide into the loser category because the Hawks misspelled his name on the back of jersey, but the man and too big a night to ignore — 30 points on 12-of-23 shooting, plus 17 rebounds and a couple of blocks. He carried the offense for stretches and the Hawks needed every bit of that to hold off the Jazz 100-97 (Utah’s shot to tie it late was not exactly pretty).

source:  Denver Nuggets. There was a time when the second night of a back-to-back up in the altitude of Denver was seen as a schedule maker’s loss — no team expected to win that game. Not any more, and not with these Blazers scoring at will in the first half — Portland led Denver 84-50 at halftime. Brian Shaw looked for what would work, throwing 13 different players on the court, and every single one of them has a negative +/- at the half. Kenneth Faried told ProBasketballTalk that the early-season problems are tied to the team just not meshing yet because of guys missing time due to injuries. That’s part of it, but there is a lot more going on here. And the Nuggets are digging the kind of early-season hole that will be hard for them to climb out of in the West.

source:  Brandon Jennings. Any night he is efficient it is actually news, and he was on Wednesday with 32 points on 11-for-19 shooting, plus 10 assists to just two turnovers. But it wasn’t enough to get the Pistons a win over the Wizards because Detroit just can’t get stops. However, Jennings is mostly here in the winner category because he did this:

Report: Tobias Harris may be eyeing Knicks as a 2015 (restricted) free agent

Brooklyn Nets v Orlando Magic

Tobias Harris and the Orlando Magic couldn’t come to terms on a contract extension before the Oct. 31 deadline to do so, so he will be a restricted free agent next summer.

Harris is on record as saying he wants to stay in Orlando, and the Magic can simply match any offer he receives to ensure that’s the case.

But Harris is from Long Island, and playing for the Knicks may be too tempting to try to pass up, should they come calling with a hefty offer sheet at the conclusion of this season.

From Adam Zagoria of The Knicks Blog (via HoopsHype):

“I’m telling you if the Knicks come at him hard, who wouldn’t want to play for their hometown team?” a Harris confidant told SNY.tv and The Knicks Blog.

The source pointed out that the 6-foot-9 Harris plays well alongside Knicks star Carmelo Anthony. The pair worked out together multiple times this summer at Terminal 23, Anthony’s midtown gym.

“They play well together,” the confidant said. “Carmelo always had him on his team when Kevin Durant came to town and they would win every game.”

There’s also the reported matter of Harris having an incentive in his Nike contract to play in a large market like New York, but even if that’s true, a player of Harris’ stature is unlikely to be materially affected by whatever bonus amount that may be; it would pale in comparison to a multi-year deal in the $8-$12 million per season range.

Harris is off to a strong start for the Magic this season, averaging career bests in points (17.5) and rebounds (8.8) while playing 37 minutes per contest.