Tag: Carmelo Anthony

Golden State Warriors v New York Knicks

Carmelo Anthony: ‘I do not expect to win a championship this year’


Carmelo Anthony went on a tour of sorts as a free agent this summer, and while he had said initially that winning was the priority, in the end he chose to take as much money as possible to remain with a Knicks team that finished outside of the playoff picture in the woeful Eastern Conference last season.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Players should make as much as they can in their relatively short careers, and Anthony in particular did what was expected, considering the way he forced his way to New York while still under contract in Denver back in 2011.

But if winning was the most important of his priorities, then New York wasn’t the best choice. Anthony preached patience, however, and knows that there’s virtually no chance that the Knicks are capable of winning the title in the upcoming season.

From Raul Alzaga of PrimeraHora.com:

“I do not expect to win a championship this year. That’s something that takes time and everything has to be in sync, from management to players. We have much work to do, but something that drives me. I know we can start creating the foundation of what we do. It’s the start of a good process, “said Anthony. “Next year we will have enough money to spend within the salary cap. But this year it is important to take the necessary steps towards those who will in the next year. I want to concentrate on building what we want from this year. “

Anytime you’re translating interviews from a foreign language it’s good to proceed with caution. But assuming what was printed was accurate, it speaks to Anthony’s bigger picture goals.

He’s always wanted to be the best player on a team in one of the biggest of the league’s markets, and in this current incarnation of the Knicks, he is exactly that. It’s not a bad thing, of course, because Anthony has provided plenty of exciting moments in his time with the team, and New York (like Los Angeles) is a market that needs a superstar player to perform on a nightly basis, even if the wins are slow to come.

But it’s fine to admit that market size and all that comes with it is the motivating factor, because winning — albeit for far less money — was much more readily guaranteed had Anthony chosen to bolt for Chicago.

LeBron James on Cleveland: “I’m not going anywhere”

LeBron James

We knew this.

After the way LeBron James framed his return to the Cleveland Cavaliers — all about wanting to go home, about unfinished business, about bringing a title to Northeast Ohio — he couldn’t leave again. Can you imagine the public relations backlash if he left them a second time?

But LeBron confirmed that, meeting briefly with the media in Akron before a welcome home rally Friday night. LeBron said this, reports Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal.

If your next question was “why have an opt out next season and have a two-year deal?” the answer is money. Raking it in. Benjamins. Getting paid.

LeBron (along with Carmelo Anthony) took the position this summer that players in their prime should not sacrifice money on their deals. (Technically ‘Melo took a $6 million haircut on a $123 million deal, but that’s not much.) After the owners won big at the last collective bargaining agreement and the players share of league revenue fell from 57 percent down to 50 percent, LeBron didn’t feel like taking a discount. Small and middle market owners — led by Cavs’ owner Dan Gilbert still sore from LeBron bolting to Miami — led the charge to put in the restrictions that would limit future super teams and force their owners to pay. Now Gilbert is going to have to write some checks and LeBron isn’t giving him a discount on it.

You can be sure that Friday night’s rally will lack the bombast of what happened in Miami four years ago. LeBron continues to do things right, there will be no “not two, not three, not four…” instead more of downplaying the expectations:

Here are a few other highlights from his comments.

Let’s give a golf clap to Flip Saunders for handling Love trade well

Flip Saunders

Flip Saunders couldn’t win.

You simply cannot trade a superstar, an elite talent and get equal value back.

Kevin Love is an elite talent (if you don’t see that it speaks to your hoops IQ) and he was forcing a trade — Love wasn’t coming back and everyone around the league knew it. That wasn’t Saunders’ fault — it was all the previous GM David Kahn who screwed up picks to put players around Love (drafting Jonny Flynn over Stephen Curry and Wesley Johnson over DeMarcus Cousins) then insulting Love by not giving him a five-year max rookie contract extension — but Saunders could not repair the relationship. It was too far gone.

By the time of the playoffs and Finals this summer Love’s agent was working hard to get his client out of Minnesota and to a destination of his choosing, using he hammer of where he would and would not re-sign after this current deal is up. That started the build up.

By the time of the draft in June there a buzz and the feeling of pressure — the naive on twitter and some talking heads said, “Saunders needs to trade Love right now, the market is never going to get better.” But teams were low-balling Minnesota, thinking there really was pressure and they wanted to get the deal done sooner rather than later.

So Saunders walked away. He was patient. He knew the low-ball offers would always be there, he could wait for better.

In any negotiation, the guy with the power is the guy more willing to walk away from the table. Saunders was that guy. He took a page out of Masai Ujiri’s book when he had the same situation with Carmelo Anthony in Denver — be patient, let a trade market really develop, wait for someone to give you something you really want.

Better offers did come in, slowly. Chicago came in with Taj Gibson, Jimmy Butler and future picks, but that was not enough. The Celtics had a nice package of potential picks and young players, but Minnesota wasn’t ready to go that route.

Then the Warriors came in with a tempting offer but Saunders held out for their most prized rookie contract — Klay Thompson. Golden State wouldn’t do it. A team who has great former shooting guards in key decision making positions — consultant/owner Jerry West and coach Steve Kerr — did not want to give up on Thompson and pairing him with Curry. So Saunders waited.

Eventually, Cleveland threw Andrew Wiggins in a package. Most likely because LeBron James told them to — part of the reason he returned to Cleveland is he and his guys have a lot more power in the organization there. Once Cleveland got LeBron back they became a win-now team and Love fits that better than the developing Wiggins. Credit LeBron for being a smart GM here.

Now the Wiggins for Love deal is set, it just can’t be executed until Aug. 23.

But that worked for Saunders. If not an outright win, it was as close to it as he would get.

Saunders got what he needed — a potential elite player back. We don’t know how good Wiggins is going to turn out to ultimately be — he is incredibly talented but has a long ways to go — but Saunders got a young player who at the very least will be part of the future core of this team. If not it’s leader and cornerstone. And he got a guy on a rookie deal that he can control for a while (Wiggins will eventually sign some kind of rookie contract extension in Minnesota and likely be there at least seven years, maybe more).

Saunders also got Anthony Bennett, a former No. 1 pick who will never live up to that billing but showed at Las Vegas Summer League this year he can become a solid rotation big in the NBA. And he got a future first round pick.

Combine that with the potential of Zach LaVine (athletic but a lot farther to go in terms of game feel than Wiggins), plus the still young Ricky Rubio and others you might have something to build on in Minnesota. Saunders will look to move players of some value for assets now — J.J. Barea, Alexey Shved and others — and start to build for the future. In the deep West there is no reason for them to get vets and try to get the eight seed, rebuild the right way. It’s about player development in Minnesota.

But the key part of rebuilding is getting the cornerstone piece, and Saunders got that.

Saunders couldn’t win, but he played this all about as well as one can. He deserves a nice golf clap for that.

Report: Knicks agree to trade Wayne Ellington, Jeremy Tyler to Kings for Travis Outlaw, Quincy Acy

New Orleans Pelicans v Sacramento Kings

The Knicks have been looking to unload Wayne Ellington for a little while, they have finally found a partner across the country.

And the Knicks got one of the NBA’s best beards in the process.

New York has agreed to send Wayne Ellington, Jeremy Tyler and they will take the restrictions off a second round pick already sent to Sacramento for Travis Outlaw and Quincy Acy, a story broken by Sam Amick of the USA Today.

The Kings are expected to waive Tyler and could use the stretch provision on Ellington, who is owed $2.77 million next season, to improve their salary cap situation. But that final decision has not been made.

First, this trade can’t be made until Aug. 25 because Ellington can’t be packaged in a deal until then.

Second, this could be the first of a couple deals for both sides. It feels like a lateral trade that is more about setting up the next deal.

Third, good on the Knicks for unloading Ellington without having to put Pablo Prigioni in as a sweetener, as had been rumored. They can use Pablo. That said, Prigioni is not yet safe according to Frank Isola of the Daily News.

That said. Acy’s beard may be the best part of this deal for the Knicks. To be fair, Outlaw gives the Knicks get a little depth behind Carmelo Anthony at the three if they don’t want to just rely on rookie Cleanthony Early, but it’s not a huge upgrade. Financially it’s a bit of a wash, save that if New York likes Acy he’s a restricted free agent next year. Acy is a more efficient scorer than Tyler (career .560 true shooting percentage for Acy compared to .471 for Tyler) but they are pretty much the same value on the court. I will say this, Acy plays hard every time out. In the other half of that deal, Ellington has played better in recent years than the seemingly declining Outlaw.

Knicks fans will love Acy. So there’s that. Aside that this is a pretty lateral move unless it is a precursor to another deal.

For the Kings, this seems to be about saving some money.

Report: Knicks want to trade Pablo Prigioni and Wayne Ellington

Brooklyn Nets v New York Knicks

The Knicks have 15 players under contract – a full roster’s worth when the regular season begins – but less than a third of them are definite Phil Jackson picks.

He drafted and signed Cleanthony Early and signed Carmelo Anthony, Cole Aldrich and Jason Smith. It’s possible Jackson also wanted Jose Calderon, Samuel Dalembert, Wayne Ellington and/or Shane Larkin – players acquired in a trade with Dallas – but it’s also possible Jackson just needed to accept their salaries to facilitate the deal.

Two of Jackson’s other signings – Shannon Brown and Lamar Odom – didn’t stick.

Everyone else is a holdover from the previous regime.

If Jackson wants to continue remaking the team in his image, he could easily waive Jeremy Tyler, whose contract is fully unguaranteed, and sign a replacement. But it seems Jackson wants to go further.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Wayne Ellington has a $2,771,340 expiring contract. Prigioni will make $1,662,961 next season, and his deal his partially guaranteed for 2015-16.

If this were just a case of wanting to dump Ellington – a quality 3-point shooter, at least when he’s open, who doesn’t contribute much else – why not just waive him? Sure, the Knicks would have to eat his salary, but they can afford it and they won’t have cap space regardless. Most importantly, waiving Ellington wouldn’t cut into 2015 cap space.

But it seems New York also views Prigioni as expendable.

Prigioni is an excellent passer who shoots efficiently due both to his stroke and his tight shot selection. He’s a minus defender despite getting a decent number of steals.

In Calderon, the Knicks have a better and younger version of that same player.

Of course, Calderon needs a backup. Even at 37, Prigioni can help next season.

It’s really a matter of how much the Knicks, who have their own 2015 draft pick, want to win now as opposed building to the future. Prigioni is better right now, but the 21-year-old Larkin has more long-term upside remaining.

If the Knicks clear a roster space, look for them to sign No. 51 pick Thanasis Antetokounmpo – another clear Jackson choice.