Tag: Carmelo Anthony

Brooklyn Nets v New York Knicks

Carmelo Anthony says his New York business interests key in him choosing to stay with Knicks


Everyone talked about the near-max money — and make no mistake, those $124 million in checks are a big part of the reason Carmelo Anthony will suit up again for the New York Knicks next season and be the guy they try to rebuild around. (Before you criticize him for that, tell me again how you would gladly leave $40+ million on the table in the prime of your career. Sure you would.)

But there were other keys to him staying put at Madison Square Garden. Certainly Phil Jackson and the Knicks having plan was part of it. Anthony’s family was part of it.

But often underestimated was the fact Anthony has business interests in the New York area he didn’t want to walk away from. Speaking at the Bloomberg Sports Summit Anthony emphasized that part of it, reports Chris Herring of the Wall Street Journal.

Way to play to your audience ‘Melo — when talking to business leaders say business was the key.

LeBron James and other free agents this summer opted for two-year deals this summer, so they can again be free agents in 2016 when the new NBA television deal is expected to kick in and the salary cap (and with that salaries) is expected to jump.

Not Anthony, he took the five years now. The Bulls wanted to do two-years and re-sign him at the max but that did not fly.

Most people around the league expected Anthony would stay in New York, although he wanted to be recruited and with that came rising hopes at points in Chicago and Los Angeles. But in the end he wanted to get paid and he likes New York and being a Knick. He wasn’t going to walk away from that.

Rebuilding around Anthony is not going to be easy or a quick fix. The Knicks need to land at least one more elite player — Rajon Rondo doesn’t fully count, if they can even get him — and they have to start bringing in role players who will fit the triangle. Because J.R. Smith does not. There is a plan but there is a lot of roster work that needs to be done (plus we have to see if Derek Fisher can really coach).

The question is will Knicks fans — and more importantly the Knicks owner — stay patient during the process? Neither are really known for their patience.

Deadline passes for Lakers to use stretch provision on Steve Nash

Utah Jazz v Los Angeles Lakers

In a very honest part of a Grantland documentary that ran during the second half of last season, Steve Nash finds out about how the Lakers could use the stretch provision that’s offered as part of the collective bargaining agreement to waive him this summer, and pay out the remainder of his $9.7 million deal over the next three seasons for salary cap purposes.

Nash seems a bit shaken by the news, and admits he’ll take some chances where his recovery is concerned in order to expedite his return to the court.

But with the Lakers being unable to add much in the way of key pieces in free agency, the team is not expected to contend for much of anything in the upcoming season. For that reason, it’s better to take the cap hit for the final year of Nash’s deal all at once, and now that the deadline has officially passed, Nash will remain on the roster for next season.

From Eric Pincus of the Los Angeles Times:

Had the Lakers waived Nash prior to September, they would have been able to stretch his salary over the next three years at around $3.2 million annually. …

The team considered increasing its spending power by stretching Nash’s salary, but when its top free-agent targets (LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony and Chris Bosh) signed elsewhere, the Lakers chose instead to protect their cap space over the next two summers — sticking with the NBA’s oldest player for a final season.

This was a move that had been expected for a while, but became even more likely once L.A. was unable to entice any of the top free agents to sign on this summer.

Nash was only healthy enough to appear in 15 games for the Lakers last season, averaging 6.8 points and 5.7 assists in 20.9 minutes per contest.

Jodie Meeks wants to bring some Kobe Bryant work ethic to Detroit

New York Knicks v Los Angeles Lakers

Jodie Meeks was brought in to knock down shots in Detroit — Stan Van Gundy likes the three ball and last season the Pistons shot just 32.1 percent from three as a team (only the Sixers were worse). Meeks took more than five threes a game last season for the Lakers and hit 40 percent of them.

Meeks also wants to bring some veteran leadership and work ethic to the Pistons — things he said he learned from a year playing with Kobe Bryant.

Meeks told his Kobe story speaking with Perry Farrell of the Detroit Free Press.

“Practice was at 11, we had to be there at 10. Well, I wanted to get there at 10,” Meeks said. “He was already there fully dressed and sweating. I got to the locker room at 9:30, got on the court at 10, and he had been there an hour and a half working on stuff.

“I was like, ‘Man, it is true.’ This guy is working like this and at the time he was 34 years old. He felt like he still had a lot to prove, and he was still trying to prove people wrong. I was like, ‘Man, great player….’

“No matter if he was sick or hurt or injured, he never made excuses. He just kept working hard. He got better, and you see where he’s at.”

Everyone who has played with Kobe has stories like that. Guys like LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony have those kinds of stories from the 2008 Beijing Olympics. They are legend around the league.

What Meeks said he wants to do is bring that kind of effort and that kind of work ethic to the Pistons and let their young stars — Andre Drummond, Greg Monroe and others — see it and learn from it.

If Meeks can be that kind of leader on a young team, he will be bringing a lot more than threes to the party.

World Cup preview: No Durant, no problem USA still one of two teams with legit shot to win gold

Team USA Showcase

Think about at the Team USA wins this summer: By 17 points over the world’s 10th ranked team Brazil; by 43 over the Dominican Republic (world No. 26); by 26 over Puerto Rico (world No. 17); then by 30 over the world’s 13th ranked team Slovenia.

So far the Americans have outscored their opponents by 35.4 points per 100 possessions (via John Schuhmann of NBA.com). A ridiculous number.

Team USA has not seriously been challenged — and most of the FIBA World Cup will look very much like that.

So much of the pre-tournament focus has been on who is not there for the Americans. No Kevin Durant. Or Paul George. And all that came after Kevin Love, Blake Griffin, LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, LaMarcus Aldridge and a host of others said no. Those are big time talents.

Doesn’t matter — the USA is so deep with guys who can ball that coach Mike Krzyzewski can still throw out a long, athletic, sharp-shooting team that will play pressure defense, run, be active, and knock down threes and flat-out overwhelm nearly every opponent. Just as they have pretty much everyone since Team USA last lost a game back in 2006.

Team USA is still loaded — Anthony Davis, James Harden, Kyrie Irving, Stephen Curry, Derrick Rose, DeMarcus Cousins, Klay Thompson, Kenneth Faried, Rudy Gay, DeMar DeRozan, Mason Plumlee and Andre Drummond. No other team in the world can match that depth. Not even close The USA’s starters (Irving, Curry, Harden, Faried, Davis) have been fantastic at both ends of the floor in the tune up games (almost doubling the score on its opponents).

The obvious strength of Team USA is the guard spot — Irving and Curry have scored very efficiently, while Harden is the team’s leading scorer so far. Then off the bench the bring the slashing athleticism of Rose and more sharp shooting with Thompson. As for all that size up front, it lets Coach K almost hockey substitute them every couple of minutes to keep the legs fresh and the energy up for their high-intensity style of play.

That group will overwhelm everyone the USA faces when it starts group play Saturday.

First up is Finland, ranked 39th in the world (a team chosen as a wild card over better, more deserving teams because Finland travel well sand FIBA wanted the cash from ticket sales), followed Sunday by a Turkish team that is well behind the USA and is likely second best in Group C. After that it is New Zealand, a Dominican Republic team that the USA already destroyed, then the Ukraine. None of those teams are a threat to a USA squad that gives even half effort (and they will as they try to find themselves).

After group play teams are seeded for a single elimination tournament and again Team USA gets a soft touch — Groups C and D fill out half the bracket and the best team is Lithuania, ranked fourth in the world and they just lost starting point guard Mantas Kalnietis due to a dislocated shoulder. Lithuania is led by the NBA’s Jonas Valanciunas and Dontas Motiejunas, both of whom are nice bigs but a couple of steps behind the USA’s front line. That’s it. No other real threats. The USA has a fairly easy path to the title game.

There is only one real threat to Team USA — Spain. And those two would not meet until said gold medal game if Spain makes it. Playing at home they probably will, but their side of the bracket will have reigning European champion France (without Tony Parker), Brazil, Argentina and Greece. Spain should advance but they have the harder road.

Spain boasts three quality NBA bigs — Marc Gasol, Pau Gasol, Serge Ibaka — plus a back court of Ricky Rubio and Rudy Fernandez. They have fallen to Team USA the last two Olympic gold medal games but played the USA close (Spain was right in it in 2012 in London until Marc Gasol had to leave with foul trouble). On their home court in front of their home fans foul trouble is not going to be an issue for Spain.

Spain poses a legitimate threat, which is why there are four centers on the NBA roster — to match up better with that size. More than that the USA will count on its athleticism and pressure to force mistakes and to make Spain uncomfortable in their offense. The USA will need Curry, Thompson and everyone else to hit their

But that’s it. The only real threat to the USA should be Spain.

It doesn’t matter who didn’t show up for America, the guys who did can flat-out ball and fit the USA’s aggressive, up-tempo style. The USA is rightfully still a gold medal favorite.

It doesn’t matter who showed up, so long as the guys that did are ready to play.

And Team USA looks ready.

Mark Cuban: Mavericks care about chemistry – not like those Rockets

Mark Cuban, Nate Silver, Michael Lewis, Daryl Morey, Paraag Marathe, NBA, NFL, FBN, BKN ENT

Daryl Morey, in a bout of confusion over Dwight Howard’s free agency last summer, called a bitter Mark Cuban about trading for Dirk Nowitzki.

Of course, Dallas said no, and Howard actually signed with Houston. But story showcases Morey’s approach.

He’s about assets more than emotion.

Morey allowed the narrative about declining Chandler Parsons’ team option to center on searching for a bigger star. He used Jeremy Lin’s number on a billboard for Carmelo Anthony, because Melo is that bigger star. He has allowed two stars (Howard and James Harden) who’ve publicly belittled their teammates to set the tone.

To be fair, Morey’s strategy has advantages. He doesn’t get too tied to players, and his constant tinkering has steadily improved Houston.

But the Rockets’ way is not the Mavericks’ way, and Cuban went out of his way to make sure you know that.

Cuban on KRLD-FM 105.3, as transcribed by The Dallas Morning News:

On the Rockets making inquiries on Dirk in the trade market:

“I was like, ‘Are you kidding me?’ He asked if we’d trade Dirk. At first I thought it was taunting, but now knowing more about Daryl I don’t think it was in hindsight. That’s just not his style. It says a lot about their approach more than anything else. They just have a different understanding and approach to chemistry than we do. Some teams, and that’s not just the Rockets, just put together talent and the talent takes care of itself. We think chemistry matters. When Carmelo came to visit us, there was no chance that we were going to put him in someone else’s jersey number and put it on the outside of the arena. That’s not our style.”

The Mavericks’ chemistry-focused approach also has its advantages. Nowitzki – despite receiving a larger offer from Houstonre-signed this summer. Parsons feels wanted in Dallas, too. That type of comfort can pay off on the court.

Really, blending asset collection and chemistry is the ideal framework for building a team. Both Cuban and Morey know this, but Cuban probably leans more toward the chemistry side. That’s especially valuable if his players his realize and appreciate it. So, Cuban is reminding them – at Morey’s expense, which also serves the double purpose of undermining Houston.

In emphasizing his emphasis on chemistry, Cuban is making strategic gains.