Tag: Carmelo Anthony


Carmelo Anthony sits out second half vs. Portland with sore knee


You could see it — late in the second quarter Carmelo Anthony drove the lane and made a lay-up against the Portland Trail Blazers, but as he ran back up the court he was wincing. He had aggravated the issue with his left knee, which caused him to miss four games recently.

Anthony did not play in the second half because of his knee.

The Knicks are off until Wednesday when they face the Clippers in Los Angeles. After that they return home to face the Pistons on Friday. Anthony has been a game time decision for a while now due to his knee issues, that likely will remain the case going forward for a while.

Without Anthony the Knicks could mount no serious challenge to the Trail Blazers (well, frankly they couldn’t do that with Anthony either). In the second half the Knicks leaned heavily on Cole Aldrich and Tim Hardaway Jr. to generate points and the result was just 34 second half points in what was a 101-79 loss. The Knicks are now 5-27 on the season and have lost 17 of 18.

Anthony said some close to him have advised him to sit out for a while to rest his knee and get healthy. He’s trying to avoid surgery, but that is not out of the question. With the way the Knicks’ season is heading — and with the fact the Knicks have their own draft pick for this season — there’s not really a reason to rush Anthony back.


Rodney Stuckey says Pistons’ downward spiral began with Chauncey Billups trade

Chauncey Billups

Seemingly overnight in the late 2000s, the Detroit Pistons went from perennial title contender to…well, what they are now. There were plenty of factors that led to this, including the disastrous signings of Ben Gordon and Charlie Villanueva in 2009 and the recently-waived Josh Smith in 2013. But former Pistons guard Rodney Stuckey, now with the Pacers, says the biggest factor in the franchise’s decline was trading 2004 Finals MVP Chauncey Billups to Denver for Allen Iverson in 2008.

From Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press:

“I wish they wouldn’t have traded away Chauncey, to be honest with you,” Stuckey said. “I wish they would’ve took the San Antonio Spurs philosophy of keeping all their vets and get younger guys around their vets and doing it that way. You see how successful they are.”

“After Chauncey left, that’s when everything went downhill. Chauncey was the glue that held everything together and held everyone accountable,” Stuckey said. “When you trade away that you see what happens. Everything was just a domino effect after that. If I’d say one thing that would be my thing.”

The Billups/Iverson trade was a disaster from the start. Iverson checked out as soon as he got to Detroit. He bristled at coming off the bench behind Rip Hamilton and had his worst statistical season to that point. Billups, meanwhile, led the Nuggets to that year’s Western Conference Finals, their deepest playoff run of the Carmelo Anthony era.

That trade took place during Stuckey’s second year in the league, when he was still developing and looked up to Billups as a mentor at the point guard position. There are few better people to learn from as a young guard than Billups, so it’s no surprise that Stuckey was shaken up by the trade.

There were a lot of terrible moves made by former Pistons GM Joe Dumars. That trade was near the top of the list.

Kyle Lowry on almost being a Knick last year: “Essentially, I was gone”

Kyle Lowry

Raptors fans have James Dolan’s fear of getting fleeced by Masai Ujiri — again — to thank for their position a top the Eastern Conference.

Remember at the start of last season the Raptors just were not working, they needed changes, and GM Masai Ujiri was clearly thinking big moves. First he traded Rudy Gay to Sacramento (which worked out well for both sides), then he set up a deal that would have sent Kyle Lowry to the Knicks for Raymond Felton, Iman Shumpert and a 2018 first round pick (Metta World Peace’s name was rumored also). A reasonable trade. But Dolan backed out (he didn’t like how the Carmelo Anthony trade went with Ujiri), Lowry stayed and the Raptors started winning. A lot.

Lowry reflected on all of that and last season speaking with Steve Simmons of the Toronto Sun (hat tip Eye on Basketball).

A day after the Raptors failed to sign Steve Nash as a free agent, (then GM) Bryan Colangelo brought Lowry in from Houston in a trade for a first-round pick and somebody named Gary Forbes. Lowry remembers his emotion on that day.

“Two and done and I’m going home,” he said….

“I figured two years and I’d be a free agent and go somewhere else. This wasn’t where I wanted to be. I tell people that all the time. You can’t predict your future. You have to live it by the day….

“Our season last year was a helluva story. I was traded (to New York). Essentially, I was gone. My best friend (Rudy Gay) got traded. It was all messed up.”

Now Lowry is happy — he signed a new deal with the Raptors this summer (four years, $48 million), he loves the city and he loves all the winning. Lowry matured, his game matured and everything fell into place last season.

Lowry is playing at an All-Star level again this season — 20 points and 7.7 assists a game with a PER of 23.9 — and the coaches are not going to leave him off the list this year as an alternate (he’s fourth in the fan voting, Toronto has come out for him in numbers, but it’s not likely the fans vault him past John Wall, Dwyane Wade or Kyrie Irving to be a starter).

As for the Knicks… well, you don’t need a ball dominating point guard in the triangle really. So you can try to console yourself with that.