Tag: Carmelo Anthony trade

Carmelo Anthony James Dolan

Are NBA trades as much about relationships as players?

1 Comment

Last month you pulled up the old trade machine and found a way for your team to finally move that bloated contract that’s an anchor on your rebuilding efforts and move him a team that could actually use him. A win-win. It’s brilliant. Why isn’t your GM talking about this deal with the other team’s GM?

Because they may not be talking.

The NBA, like many businesses, is about relationships. It’s a pretty tight community. And as Ben Golliver points out at Hoopshype from his time at the MIT’s Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, those relationships influence trades.

“The first misunderstanding about trades is that the NBA is an efficient market for trades,” (Mavericks owner Mark) Cuban said. “It’s not. Not all teams talk equally to each other. It’s not like the stock market… Different teams have different relationships, more of a trust factor.”

Just as relationships can help deals get done, they can prevent deals from happening….

“Because some teams are more into analytics, [some GMs] may be less willing to deal with you because they may think you’re taking advantage of them. If you go back through history, there are teams that have not only not done trades, they don’t even talk to each other.”

Shortly thereafter, the panel kidded (Rockets GM Daryl) Morey for trading with the Memphis Grizzlies “every February.” Surveying some of the moves made during the trade season, Cuban’s comments cast them in a new light. Who could forget the New York Knicks hired former Denver Nuggets executive Mark Warkentien as a consultant just weeks before trading for Carmelo Anthony? Was it simply a coincidence that the best deal available for the Portland Trail Blazers and Charlotte Bobcats were with each other, given that the president of the Blazers, Larry Miller, is the former president of Jordan Brand and keeps a picture of himself with Bobcats owner Michael Jordan in his Rose Quarter office? Who knows, but relationships can’t hurt and they certainly don’t play a role when fans or writers fire up the ESPN Trade Machine.

You would think the GM that can put the relationships aside and just do business with anyone would have an advantage. It’s never that clean or simple, but the more doors you can keep open the more options you would have.

‘Melo wants you to know he is too a team player

New York Knicks v Dallas Mavericks

It’s been pretty hard to miss the glee coming out of the Rocky Mountains — Denver is 8-2 since the Carmelo Anthony trade and they are all too happy to tell you about how they are more of a team, how they are playing defense, how the sun shine feels warmer and how the bluebird of happiness now mops up the sweat at their practices.

George Karl can’t seem to help but take some backhanded digs at Anthony when he talks about the teamwork and ball movement in Denver.

The Knicks are 6-5 since the trade and have alternated between looking brilliant and looking like something you might step in when visiting one of those areas near the great lawn in Central Park where dogs get some run.

For the record, Anthony is pretty sick of the sniping from out West, as he told the New York Post.

“I really think they kind of don’t want me to have success in New York, the way I look at it,” Anthony said at this morning’s shootaround at Conseco Field House before the Knicks get their rematch vs. the Pacers. “I try not to think about that. I’ve been in Denver 7 ½ years. For me to move on was a hard thing to do. This is a business and I’ve cut my ties there. ”

“For me personally, it’s a matter of trying to make other guys better,” Anthony said. “I think it’s a challenge I take upon myself to get guys like Shawne Williams going, Landry (Fields) going, keep Toney (Douglas’) confidence up since he’s coming off the bench now with Chauncey (Billups) back.

Since coming to New York Anthony is assisting on about 17 percent of other teammates field goals when he is on the floor in New York, up from about 14.4 percent in Denver earlier this season. Anthony is also shooting a little more often as well (about a shot a game, or half a shot per 36 minute average).

Anthony is not completely selfish, but he’s also out there to score points. That’s what he does. He may be conscious about trying to set other guys up, but at the end of the day he was brought in to shoot the rock.

What will change the perception? Winning. That’s it. That changes everything in American sports. Right now Denver is winning more and they get to set the tone of debate because people are checking them out and listening to them. When the Knicks start winning more, people will praise how Anthony makes teammates better.

Even though he’s pretty much the exact same player, NYC or Denver.

What to Watch: Melo Debuts for the Knicks

New York Knicks Introduce Carmelo Anthony
Leave a comment

After many, many, many, many, many, many, many, many months, Carmelo Anthony has finally been traded to the New York Knicks. He’ll debut tonight beside Amar’e Stoudemire against the Bucks in front of a sold-out crowd which will be buzzing like arguably never before.  But what exactly should we be watching for, exactly? Here are five things to watch for in Melo’s Big Apple Debut.

1. The Stoudemelo Connection: Lame? Absolutely, but until a cooler nickname is invented, we’re going for it. The big key tonight is spacing with Stoudemire and Melo. One of the things that LeBron James and Dwyane Wade found out early on in the season was that spacing is not something that comes naturally to a superstar. As the key offensive player, you’re used to having the run of the floor to do what you wish.  But the two have to find a way to play off each other to punish a double team while also not clogging up the offense. That means precision and passing, and tonight’s going to give us an indication of just how far Mike D’Antoni is going to have to bring the two of them. Both Stoudemire and Melo like to work on the right elbow, so there’s going to be some different things for them to work out.  Communication is going to have to be key, and right off the bat, both are going to want to establish their leadership. Hope everyone stays happy.

2. They (Need To) Like To Move It, Move It: Mike D’Antoni’s system is fast paced. George Karl’s system is fast paced. So this should be no problem for Melo, right? Except that D’Antoni’s system is highly dependent on ball movement, not ISO possessions, the Melo favorite. So tonight will be an adjustment not only for Melo, but for the Knicks, trying to work Melo into their flow. There are going to be blown possessions, going to be turnovers. They need to make progress on discovering Melo’s tendencies and what needs to happen for the Knicks as well.

3. La La Vasquez: Because, I mean, have you ever seen a woman so happy her head literally combusts into diamonds, shoes, and reality show casting sheeets? Seriously, I wouldn’t be surprised if she has pom poms and keeps singing “Empire State of Mind” over and over again.

4. D’Antoni’s Demeanor: This isn’t really D’Antoni’s bag. Sure, he likes star players and is happy to get Anthony. But he’s got a huge ego that just walked into his locker room, and several of the players he selected have walked out the door. Throw in on top of that the fact that his frontcourt down low is thinner than La La, and Mike’s got a hill to climb, starting tonight. It’ll be interesting to see who he leans on at the two-guard spot, and who he turns to to provide perimeter scoring. The Bucks are a good defensive team, so this is a stiff test for a team thrown together just a few hours ago.

5. Madison Square Garden Party: New York is a big town. A big, loud, town that loves basketball, loves sports, loves the Knicks, and loves making a big spectacle of itself. In the world’s most famous arena, Carmelo Anthony takes the floor to join Amar’e Stoudemire in a signal that the Knicks are not just “back” but loaded to push for the future. This is Melo’s coming out party to the New York media, their celebration of their second All-Star, and a chance for Knicks fans to embrace their new era of relevance on a scale not seen this decade. It’s going to be raucous, it’s going to be intense, and it’s honestly going to be worth watching.

Unless you’re a Nuggets fan.

The Knickerbocker Empire got its prize in Melo, but the real battle begins now

Isaih Thomas Introduced as New Knicks GM

Congratulations, Mr. Dolan! You’ve landed your prize! You have two, count ’em two, stars to fill the seats in Madison Square Garden. Carmelo Anthony joins Amar’e Stoudemire for the Knicks and the star power is through the roof now in New York. You have successfully acquired a second NBA All-Star, which is difficult to do and a testament to the power of the brand you acquired (and have largely run into the gutter for the past decade, but that’s beside the point).  This is a huge day for you and you should be proud and happy. Bask in the glow of the media attention and the jersey sales for today through Wednesday night’s probable Melo debut.

Then get ready for some massive headaches.

After this move settles down, Dolan and his crew are going to be facing one of the tightest cap situations in the league, regardless of how the CBA works out. They now have close to $40 million on the books for next season and seasons going forward between just two players. That’s a whole lot of money in two guys, when you need a solid seven at the very least to compete for a championship.  It’s been said that you can develop role players. That’s absolutely true, but it also takes draft picks to get those guys, and the Knicks are now missing their 2012 and 2014 picks. So how they’re going to get there is going to be a little bit tricky. And it’s going to take someone like Donnie Walsh, a shrewd evaluator of talent, to figure out how to get the support Melo and Amar’e will need.

But will Walsh even be around? Reports are rampant in the wake of this trade that this was Isiah’s work, pressing Dolan to intervene, and not Walsh. Walsh, consistently has played his cards tight to his chest, knowing he held leverage and could get Melo and keep the supporting pieces to put the Knicks on an advanced track. Instead, Dolan let Thomas get his ear, and now there indications that the shadow that held over the Garden for five years is creeping over the gates. Thomas is making a power play and Dolan is caving to it, even as it’s been Walsh who has guided the team back to relevance, being careful and considerate with his decisions.

The Knicks’ future won’t be decided on the floor with superstars with bright lights in their eyes balancing being cultural icons and All-Stars. It will be decided in boardrooms, both inside and outside the MSG Empire. Internally, if Dolan continues to seek out Isiah Thomas’ counsel, undercutting Walsh, that situation will become untenable. Walsh has been around too long to put up with that kind of circus act especially with his contract up at the end of the year. Getting Melo is an upgrade, but it came at a price and Walsh has to feel like if he’d been granted control, Anthony could have been had without giving up so much. If Isiah Thomas somehow works his way back into the driver’s seat of the Knicksmobile, expect the fans’ reaction to be nothing short of outrage.

Outside the Knicks, though, is another fight Dolan will be involved in. The CBA negotiations take place this summer, and while his fellow owners are pushing for a drastic reduction in the salary cap and possibly a hard cap, Dolan may have to try and politic his way into finding a base for compromise. In short, anything which restricts player movement and lowers the cap without rolling back the current contracts of Stoudemire and Anthony is going to keep the Knicks from being able to do what Dolan wants: buy their way into a championship. The next piece of this puzzle comes in 2012 for New York, as they attempt to chase Dwight Howard, Chris Paul, and Deron Williams. But if the Knicks are cap strapped thanks to this move and a revamped CBA, that goes out the window and the Knicks are looking at a roster-limited team  with no structure beneath the big jewels up top.

And guess what happens, then? Should the Knicks fail to contend for a championship because they can’t get the pieces around the two stars, it wont’ be Dolan admitting his mistake or allowing Walsh to work his magic. Instead it will be Mike D’Antoni’s job on the line as the idea will surface that it’s his fault the Knicks go further. We’ve seen this pattern before in the NBA.

The Knicks hit the big time. Now we have to see if the organization as a whole can survive under the lights.

Report: Nuggets coach George Karl likes the Knicks deal best

Image (1) anthony_Karl-thumb-250x181-21662.jpg for post 6222

Coaches often make the worst general managers. They are notoriously bad at structuring trades. Coaches fall in love with players they think give them the best chance of winning right now. GM’s need to think big picture.

So not all that surprising that while the Nuggets brass prefers the promise of Derrick Favors and picks the Nuggets coach might prefer guys like Wilson Chandler and Danilo Galliari who can step in now.

According to Mark Spears at Yahoo, Nuggets coach George Karl does prefer the Knicks offer and is pushing the team to take it.

This is back to being a three-team deal now with the Timberwolves involved. The Nuggets would get Raymond Felton (who they likely would flip into another trade), Gallinari, Chandler, the Knicks 2014 first-round pick and Corey Brewer from Minnesota. The Knicks would get Anthony, Chauncey Billups Shelden Williams and Renaldo Balkman. Minnesota would get Anthony Randolph and Eddy Curry’s expiring contract from the Knicks.

The Nuggets are pushing to get Timofey Mozgov from the Knicks as well, but the Knicks have balked at including one more player.

The Nets appear to be the odd team out, but they say they remain confident about making a deal. Of course they do.