Tag: Byron Mullens

LeBron James Football

Thursday And-1 links: LeBron took his kids to Browns practices to see Johnny Manziel


Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points more than TMZ loves Jay Z/Beyonce marital trouble….

• The only thing anywhere near as hot as LeBron James in Cleveland is Johnny Manziel. And the future savior of the Browns (*cough*) is still a distant second. But the stars almost collided on Thursday when LeBron took his boys to see the Browns practice as they get ready for their first preseason game this weekend. LeBron talked with Browns coach Mike Pettine as well as with Manziel (who is represented by LeBron’s marketing firm).

“He just asked how camp was going,” Pettine said. “You could tell that he’s into it and loves football, a big Browns fan. He said he’ll be at the games when it’s warm and when it’s cold he’ll be watching in his basement.”

There are some things Miami can always offer that Cleveland can’t, not needing to bundle up for a game is one of them.

• LeBron’s old running mates in Miami, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade now have something else in common — their own lines of ties.

• Sixers GM Sam Hinkie is still trying to find a way into and to get some value out of the Kevin Love trade, and he’s ticked that the Thaddeus Young rumors leaked.

• Dirk Nowitzki the movie? Fortunately it’s a documentary about the star, which is set to debut in Germany in September.

• Sports Illustrated’s Lee Jenkins — of course it’s him — with the best big of writing anywhere on Paul George and his injury.

Power ranking the best/worst uniforms in the NBA over at CSNWashington.com.

• After watching the Spurs knock them out of the playoffs, Thunder coach Scott Brooks wants his team to increase its assists and move the ball better next season. I bet 2/3 of the coaches in the league say that, and I doubt many have any success. We’ll see if Brooks is the exception.

• One league executive told the Philadelphia Daily News that the Sixers have a “negative effect on the integrity of the NBA.”

• Brook Lopez says he is fully cleared for basketball activities. Which should make the good people of Brooklyn happy. Well, relatively.

• One final bit out of my time with Team USA in Las Vegas, it is Mike Krzyzewski talking about Kyrie Irving: “He’s not been accustomed to playing with guys who are rim runners, and with the shooters. In some respects you create a little tunnel vision of him as a scorer, in this camp he reacquaints himself with lobs, with drive-and-kick, with things he hasn’t been asked to do as much in the past couple years.”

• Kemba Walker is pumped to have someone else who can create their own offense off the bounce in Charlotte. As he should be.

• Michael Beasley went to Los Angeles for some workouts in front of teams last week. While there he rented a car — a Porsche none the less — but he didn’t bother to return it so the rental company had to come and tow it away. And you wonder why teams are lining up to take his talent.

• RIP to Dale Schlueter, an original member of the Portland Trail Blazers from their inaugural season (1970-71), who died of cancer last week at the age of 68.

• Watch the Bucks’ John Henson eat his way through the Wisconsin State Fair. For the record, this is not exactly doctor recommended healthy eating.

• Much to the joy of the Orlando brass, Maurice Harkless will not play for Puerto Rico in the FIBA World Cup this summer.

• Hawks’ second round pick Edy Tavares is expected to play next season in Spain.

• Byron Mullens will play in China next season.

• Finally, Minnesota’s Zach LaVine with the selfie dunk video.

Extra Pass: How Brett Brown and his 76ers have embraced their youth

Philadelphia 76ers v Houston Rockets

BOSTON – “Do we have young-guy film today?” a player calls from the corner of the 76ers locker room.

Curious, I ask the 76ers’ media-relations official what that is.

“What do you think it is?” he replies.

“I’d guess its film young guys have to watch,” I say. “But, on this team, isn’t that everybody?”

“Pretty much,” Thaddeus Young chimes in.

The 76ers, carrying an average age of 23.4 (weighted for playing time and holding a player’s age constant as of Feb. 1 each season), are the NBA’s youngest team. Their youth permeates through their organizational culture, maybe even defining them more than losing has – though it’s not as if those traits are mutually exclusive.

They have the sixth-youngest team of all-time. By comparison they have the relatively non-descript 51st-worst win percentage of all-time, and even if they lose out, that would drop only to 33rd-worst.


Philadelphia has only one player older than 26 – 33-year-old Jason Richardson, who has missed the entire season due to injury. Every other team has at least three players over 26.

So, when the 76ers hold young-guy film, it’s essentially team film. Only Young and James Anderson, a fourth-year pro, are exempt.

Rookie 76ers coach Brett Brown implemented the film sessions as a way to provide extra tutoring for young players during an NBA season that includes little practice time, and he personally decided who must participate. He likes the system and would have used it with any roster, though had he taken over certain other teams, maybe only a couple players would have been required to attend.

In Philadelphia, it’s become an essential tool.

Many coaches talk about loving the profession for the ability to teach above all else. But few competitors, which all NBA coaches are, would trade a good team (which requires fewer lessons) for a bad team (which requires more).

Brown doesn’t have that option, and if he did, there’s nothing to say he wouldn’t exercise it. However, he has remained enthusiastic through Philadelphia’s 17-60 season, demonstrating a real passion for serving the 76ers’ youth.

“I love coaching these guys,” Brown said. “They play hard. They play with their hearts on their sleeves.”

Philadelphia’s youngest player is 19-year-old Nerlens Noel, the No. 6 pick in last year’s draft who has yet to play this season due to injury. League-wide, only Giannis Antetokounmpo and Archie Goodwin are younger.

Of 76ers who’ve actually played this season, 20-year-old Tony Wroten is youngest.

“You would never realize that I’m the youngest guy playing right now,” Wroten said.

That’s because Wroten spent last season with the Memphis Grizzlies. The guard has played more NBA games than anyone in Philadelphia outside Young, Anderson and Byron Mullens. At times, Wroten feels he should help the 76ers’ six rookies, but it’s a tough balancing act.

“I’m still learning too every day,” Wroten said.

As are all the 76ers.

The players were recently discussing the oldest one on the team besides Richardson. Young thought it was himself. A lot of 76ers probably thought it was Young, too. Jarvis Varnado sure did.

But it’s actually 26-year-old Varnado, who beat 25-year-old Young into this world by a few months.

Varnado and Young actually graduated high school the same year, but Young left Georgia Tech after only one season, and Varnado played all four years at Mississippi State. Their professional careers have followed similar tracks. While Young is in the midst of a five-year, $43 million contract, Varnado is already with his fourth team in two seasons, trying to extend an NBA career that didn’t begin until two years after the Heat picked him in the second round of the 2010 draft. He signed with the 76ers on a 10-day contract before getting a rest-of-season-deal last month.

Never expecting to be the the oldest player on a team at this stage of his career, Varnado he likes the environment in Philadelphia nonetheless.

“We barely know the NBA,” Varnado said. “So, we’re just trying to go out there and trying to play hard. A lot of guys in here are trying to fight for jobs next year. So, we’re trying to impress everybody.”

And as far as his role as elder statesman?

“I haven’t really felt old,” Varnado said. “I’m around a lot of guys who are young guys, but I don’t feel old, though.”

Neither does Young, whom Brown calls the team’s grandfather.

“I’m still relatively young,” Young said. “It’s just I’ve seen a lot more than they have in this NBA structure.”

Including his veteran teammates traded.

The 76ers began the season with a few 25-year-olds – Evan Tuner, Spencer Hawes and Lavoy Allen – but they dealt all three at the trade deadline (Turner and Allen to the Pacers, Hawes to the Cavaliers). A separate deal with the Wizards netted Eric Maynor – who, at 26, is the oldest person to play for Philadelphia this season – but, per his request, Philadelphia waived him after just eight games.

That left Young as the only 76er with a history of quality NBA production, even generously counting a few small-sample seasons by his teammates.


Philadelphia is not young by accident, and those trades and buyouts are part of a long-term rebuilding strategy. In place of veterans like Turner and Hawes, the 76ers have turned to younger, cheaper and less-productive alternatives.

“It definitely tested my patience a little bit,” Young said. “I was just dealing with so many young guys and them not knowing certain things.

“On any team, you want as many veterans as possible. It definitely helps out having a lot of veterans, because sometimes, younger players just don’t know certain things.”

But for all the downside, Young appreciates aspects of the 76ers’ youth movement. He enjoys going fast – Philadelphia plays at the highest pace the NBA has seen in four years – and he’s grown as a leader.

Though Varnado edges him by a few months in age, Young is the unquestioned face of the 76ers.

“He’s had to carry a young team that is in a total rebuild mode, and he’s endured that,” Brown said. “He’s found ways to compete and lead and not whine or cry about it. He’s dug in.”

Young has done so as the 76ers have gotten progressively younger, especially after the trade deadline. They were always headed toward one of the eight youngest seasons ever, but now they appear likely to close sixth.


Perhaps, I’m overstating the 76ers’ youth. After all, I’m counting their age in human years. Like dog years, maybe another measure – Sixer years? – is more appropriate.

On Jan. 29, the 76ers won in Boston. Their next game began a 26-game losing streak. During it, they traded Turner and Allen, traded Hawes, traded for Mullens, traded for Maynor, waived Earl Clark, waived Danny Granger, signed Varnado, waived Lorenzo Brown, signed Darius Johnson-Odom, waived Maynor and signed James Nunnally.

Finally, they returned to Boston this weekend and won again. Brown recalled Philadelphia’s first victory over the Celtics, just 65 days prior.

“That,” Brown said, “seems like a thousand years ago.”

Atlanta Hawks waive Antawn Jamison

Denver Nuggets v Los Angeles Clippers

And now comes the annual tradition of waiving players acquired on trade deadline day you didn’t really want…

Antawn Jamison, come on down, you’re next.

The Atlanta Hawks have waived Jamison, the team announced. If he clears waivers in 48 hours (as is expected) he will become a unrestricted free agent.

Jamison was traded to the Hawks on Thursday for the draft rights to Cenk Akyol and cash. The Clippers wanted to clear out some salary room on the roster, the Hawks got cash to make that happen. Jamison was supposed to provide L.A. a stretch four but that hadn’t worked out and he had been used in a limited role by the Clippers getting in just 22 games, averaging 3.8 points and 2.5 rebounds when he did. Jamison had been with the Lakers the year before and was used sparingly there as well. This has frustrated a proud veteran player who believes he can still contribute to a team coming off the bench.

He may get a chance to prove that somewhere if he signs as a free agent. The Hawks will not be that team, and they have already filled that roster space giving Cartier Martin another 10-day contract.