Tag: Brook Lopez

Brooklyn Nets v Detroit Pistons

Report: Nets to explore trade market for Mason Plumlee


The Nets had chances to trade Mason Plumlee early in the season, but the problem at the time was that he was playing well while Brook Lopez was sidelined due to injury, and the offers wouldn’t have brought back enough in return.

Brooklyn was reportedly deep in talks with the Kings on a multi-player deal that would have shed the contract of Deron Williams, but Sacramento asking for Plumlee to be thrown in eventually killed the conversation.

As the Nets look to dramatically reshape the roster this summer, just about everything is on the table. And that includes revisiting what the market may now be like for Plumlee’s services.

From Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

It’s unavoidably tantalizing to think about what the Nets might have gotten for Plumlee, had they actively shopped him before he fell out of favor — bearing in mind the two future first-round picks Denver extracted from Cleveland for Timofey Mozgov.

Some rival executives think the Nets might go ahead and explore the Plumlee marketplace anyway, in hopes teams remember his dogged play for Team USA the past summer more than his struggles to get on the floor under first-year Nets coach Lionel Hollins. Now, though, would not appear to be the ideal time to see what shopping him might fetch. …

And I’m hearing teams have indeed begun to inquire about availability of Mason Plumlee based on belief Nets willing to move young big man

The only scenario that should be appealing in terms of trading Plumlee would be one in which Williams or Joe Johnson would be dealt at the same time, while Brooklyn received young talent or draft picks in return to jumpstart the rebuilding process.

Plumlee is still on a rookie scale contract, and having productive players on those inexpensive deals is invaluable for teams trying to manage salary cap and luxury tax challenges.

The Nets have wildly overspent in recent years, and it’s gotten them nowhere. Even if Brook Lopez re-signs in free agency, and even though Plumlee played sparingly as Brooklyn made its late-season run to make the playoffs, Plumlee remains a solid prospect capable of improving. And for what the Nets are paying him, he’s an even better fit for the long-term plans of the franchise.

Report: Nets to shop Joe Johnson, Jarrett Jack in effort to get under luxury tax line

Golden State Warriors v Brooklyn Nets

Everyone fears the repeater tax — even McHale Prokhorov.

Under the terms of the current NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement, teams that pay the luxury tax four seasons in a row will fork over at a higher “repeater tax” rate for living above the line (something meant to punish teams like the Lakers and others that would ignore the tax line in the old CBA). That higher tax rate starts at $2.50 for each $1 teams are over the line (for non-repeaters the rate is $1.50 per $1). The rate goes up if teams are more than $5 million over the line.

No team has yet to pay it — but the Brooklyn Nets could be the first next season. Thanks to their ill-advised “buy me a winner so I can open Barclays Center” season, the Nets have been way over the tax line. Next season would be their fourth over the line (expected to be about $81 million), depending on what happens with keeping Brook Lopez and Thaddeus Young (both are expected to opt out and be free agents, the Nets say it is a priority to re-sign both).

To get under the line, the Nets may try to trade some key pieces, reports Marc Stein at ESPN.

It is widely assumed the Nets will explore the trade markets for both Joe Johnson (with his expiring $24.9 million deal) and Jarrett Jack (due $12.6 million over the next two seasons but only partially guaranteed in 2016-17) to try to get away from tax territory that way, instead of waiving and stretching Deron Williams.

In an ideal world, the Nets could rid themselves of the two-years, $43.3 million left on Deron Williams’ deal, but that will not be easy. Williams declining skill set and injury history make him hard to trade (the Nets don’t have sweeteners like draft picks they can afford to throw in a deal). If they use the stretch provision in Williams he’ll be on the books for almost $9 million a year for five years. Better to bite the bullet now.

Johnson, owed $24.9 million next season, also will not be easy to move at that price, expiring contract or not. Again, teams will want more as reasons to take on that salary.

Jack is owed a very reasonable $6.3 million next season and is only partially guaranteed at that same price for the following season. A lot of teams would be interested in Jack at that price as a backup point guard they can trust.

The Nets are in arguably the worst situation going forward in the league — they are old and expensive, without many draft picks thanks to their trades. Things are going to get worse before they get better in Brooklyn, especially if they start trading away salary to save money.

Stephen Curry, LeBron James unanimous choices, lead All-NBA First Team

Stephen Curry

This is bigger than the All-Star Game for a lot of players. Because it’s more exclusive.

Only six guards, six forwards and three centers get to make the All-NBA team, it is the cream that has risen to the top of the NBA.

No shock, LeBron James and freshly-minted MVP Stephen Curry were unanimous choices to make the first team — if you put together a ballot and they’re not on it you’re doing it wrong. This is also the first First Team vote for Anthony Davis, who earned this spot based on his historic season and carrying the Pelicans to the playoffs.

No Hawks made the list — the team ball concepts can hurt come time for individual awards. Fair or not.

Here is the full list. The two forwards are listed first, followed by the center, then the two guards. After the players team is the number of first team votes (in parenthesis) and total points.


LeBron James, Cleveland (129) 645
Anthony Davis, New Orleans (119) 625
Marc Gasol, Memphis (65) 453
Stephen Curry, Golden State (129) 645
James Harden, Houston (125) 637


LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland (13) 390
DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento (18) 220
Pau Gasol, Chicago (15) 242
Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City (10) 397
Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers (1) 335


Blake Griffin, L.A. Clippers (2) 189
Tim Duncan, San Antonio (6) 167
DeAndre Jordan, L.A. Clippers (12) 175
Klay Thompson, Golden State 122
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland 112

Other players receiving votes, with point totals (First Team votes in parentheses): Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio, 155; Paul Millsap, Atlanta, 70; Al Horford, Atlanta, 64 (1); John Wall, Washington, 50; Jimmy Butler, Chicago, 32; Damian Lillard, Portland, 22; Draymond Green, Golden State, 9; Zach Randolph, Memphis, 7; Jeff Teague, Atlanta, 7; Andrew Bogut, Golden State, 6; Nikola Vucevic, Orlando, 6; DeMar DeRozan, Toronto, 3; Rudy Gay, Sacramento, 3; Andre Drummond, Detroit, 2; Gordon Hayward, Utah, 2; Kyle Korver, Atlanta, 2; Joakim Noah, Chicago, 2; Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas, 2; Dwyane Wade, Miami, 2; Carmelo Anthony, New York, 1; Tyson Chandler, Dallas, 1; Mike Conley, Memphis, 1; Brook Lopez, Brooklyn, 1; Kevin Love, Cleveland, 1; Kyle Lowry, Toronto, 1; Khris Middleton, Milwaukee, 1.