Tag: Brian Cardinal

Charlotte Bobcats v Miami Heat

Winderman: Juwan Howard, other name players could fade away from NBA


The fadeaway long has been an NBA fact of life.

While the stars hold press conferences to announce enough is enough, their fame to keep them in the spotlight (and possibly part of broadcast teams) long after their playing days — something we soon might get from Ben Wallace — for the majority of those with flickering tenures, it just ends.

Over the weekend, a pair of minute moves might have signaled such fadeaways.

With the Heat adding big men Mickell Gladness and Jarvis Varnado, the odds diminished on Juwan Howard remaining along for the ride in Miami for another championship quest.

And in Toronto, with the Raptors adding Dominic McGuire, the door apparently finally has closed for Jamaal Magloire, with even his hometown team moving on.

Which is the way it tends to happen for those who attempt to squeeze out every last ounce.

For some, it means waiting around for injuries to pile up, with big men more likely to get another last chance, something Erick Dampier, once again on the outside, has cashed in on during each of the past two seasons.

For others, the choice is to step aside instead of waiting, which is why you’ll now find Brian Scalabrine wearing a headset with the Celtics, instead of waving a towel for the Bulls.

So who are most likely to simply fade away, known NBA quantities no longer with a seat at the table?

Among the prime candidates who a month from now we might be saying, “Hey, whatever happened to?” are Brian Cardinal, Mike Bibby, Mike James, Damien Wilkins, Tony Battie, Dan Gadzuric, Brian Cook and several other who not all that long again held regular rotation roles.

With the luxury tax proving more onerous, a 15-man roster no longer is as likely to remain the universal truth. Players who previously might never have considered non-guaranteed contracts now have a decision to make based on pride.

“There’s a lot of guys still out here and not a lot of spots left,” one agent representing a respect former rotation player said last week. “Team know that, which is why we’re starting to see these make-good minimums.”

Sometimes pride says enough is enough, NBA legacies valued as worth more than a game-to-game paycheck.

It happens every year. The reality is about to hit home for some known quantities.

September can be the cruelest month.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at @IraHeatBeat.

Monday And-1 links: Photographic evidence of Celtics changes

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Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points like Alex Morgan loves headers.

• How much have the Celtics changed the roster? Look at Avery Bradley’s new twitter avatar (photo to right) and see how many guys are left on the team.

• Former Laker and Net (and Bruin if you want to keep going back, and a Toreador before that) has signed a three-year deal with Anadolu Efes in Turkey. Farmar had been filler sent to the Hawks in the Joe Johnson trade. Farmar played well for Maccabi Tel Aviv last year during the lockout averaging 14.1 points and 4 assists per game.

• Speaking of former Lakers and Nets being overseas, Sasha Vujacic has re-signed with Anadolu Efes Istanbul for one more season.

• Interesting story on Kevin Durant’s father watching his son succeed in London from afar.

• Everyone in Cleveland still expects Alonzo Gee to sign his $2.7 million qualifying offer. Because he’s not going to get a better one.

• Wonder why teams have been slow to sign Chris Andersen? Well, aside some looming potential legal issues, there is the fact he had his knee scoped about a month ago.

• Brian Cardinal is hoping to get a deal for one more season in the NBA. Somebody give pops a contract.

• Ish Smith may get a Magic training camp invite.

• J.R. Bremer’s agent says he may get a Rockets camp invite.

• Larry Owens, who was waived by the Nets and spent most of last season in the D-League, has signed to play with Gravelines-Dunkerque in France next season.

Why you should and should not care about LeBron’s whole “passing in the clutch” thing


To review, in last night’s game, the Miami Heat came from behind to lead the Utah Jazz, only to watch Al Jefferson take the lead with a hook shot. At that point, the Heat had time for one final possession. Remember when LeBron passed up the final shot and everyone gave him huge grief about it? Yeah, this time he didn’t inbound, he took the ball, then swung and made a pass to a wide-open Udonis Haslem, who missed the game-winning jumper. Jazz win 99-98.

So here’s a little discussion of why you should and should not care about this.

You should care about this because: Well, it doesn’t really matter if you care about it or not, you’re going to be hearing about it for the next 24 hours until the Heat play the Lakers. Welcome to the news cycle, enjoy your stay.

You should not care about this because: It was a regular season game on a back-to-back on the road during a west coast trip. NBA teams lose these games all the time. Even Kobe. Even Jordan. Even Brian Cardinal. It happens, and it’s a blip in the radar. We can’t say “nothing matters until the playoffs” and then freak out over a regular season game. Well, we can, and we will, but we probably shouldn’t.

You should care about this because: It’s reflective of the standard people have set for LeBron. You can choose to set a different standard outside of our culture, but eventually your evaluations will regress back to the mean of our society. You can try and applaud James for making the right play, but it’s clear that we as a basketball society have redefined our decision-making chart based on Michael Jordan. To be the best, which James is, you have to pull-up and take and hit that mid-range-to-long-range jumper with a hand in your face. Making the right play is not considered the right play in this instance.

You should not care about this because: Let’s face it, it was the right play. An open jumper from a guy who has, in his career, hit a high number of big shots, is a much higher percentage shot than a contested off-dribble pull-up jumper. That’s just simply basketball. Michael Jordan passed to Steve Kerr. Kobe Bryant passed to Metta World Peace. You make the play when it’s there, especially when you’re as gifted of a passer as LeBron.

You should care about this because: Erik Spoelstra drew up a play that involved a pick and roll with Udonis Haslem instead of an isolation for LeBron or a pick and roll with Dwyane Wade. You know what we kill the Thunder for? Drawing up terrible late-game possessions that are essentially “Here, Kevin Durant, go win this” and sometimes it works and sometimes Durant throws up 35-foot threes that miss badly.Wade and James haven’t been super effective in the pick and roll throughout their time together, but that’s still the guys you want with the ball. Wade misses that shot and the narrative is likely different, slightly. It’s not the wrong play, but it says something about Spoelstra’s mindset and the approach of the team.

You should not care about this because: We destroy guys for being too selfish, for going hero mode, for jacking up shots instead of working in a system. Instead, now we’re killing players for making the right play, making the easy play, trusting in their teammates. The double standard is so blinding you can’t see the shine off James’ forehead, and as a bald guy, I can tell you that gets bright.

You should care about this because: It’s yet another game the Heat should have won over a lesser team that was lost due to a late-game decision by LeBron. (We can blame Haslme for the missed jumper but that’s not going to happen. Stars take the blame.) The Heat continue to struggle in key situations on the road nd most of the games in the playoffs aren’t going to be blowouts.

You should not care about this because: It was their first loss in weeks after a long winning streak all by double-digits. This team is not “in trouble” or “struggling.” They lost “a game.”

You should care about this because: Where was Dwyane Wade? Wade in the final minutes fouled Devin Harris on a three-pointer, one of the single dumbest plays of the season and then later missed a free throw. Where’s his public shaming? The fact that James’ narrative completely overrides a terrible game for Wade should probably be mentioned.

You should care about this because: James had 35-10-6 and poured it on in the fourth quarter. He made ridiculous shot after ridiculous shot to get them back in it and carried the team on his shoulders. When it counted, he passed to an open teammate. Most guys do what he did in the fourth and we marvel at their effort in a loss. James does it and there’s something wrong with him.

This is more about who we are than who LeBron James is.