Tag: Boston Orlando Game 3

NBA Playoffs Celtics Magic Game 3: Where losing momentum is about the only Celtics concern

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TAllen.jpgNBA coaches tend to operate like a lazy politician — they use fear. Scare the team by showing them their mistakes and the consequences, press the buttons on their fear of failure (or threaten their playing time), motivate them to work and focus to avoid that.

Doc Rivers has to find another way — there’s not much he’d want to change about the first two games of the Eastern Conference Finals. The games were close, but the Celtics defense was fantastic and they closed out games on the road. They are up 2-0. About the only thing the Celtics have to worry about is a loss of momentum. So we’ll try to play that up.

In the last round against the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Celtics got a momentum turning win at Quicken Loans Arena, tying the series at 1-1 heading back to Boston. Everything was going the Celtics way…

Except for the schedule. They had to take three days off, a game on Monday and the next one on Friday. Momentum took a holiday. The Cavaliers came into Boston and smacked the home team around good, winning by 29.

Now in the Eastern Conference Finals, Boston went on the road and momentum was all theirs — they took two games from the Magic. Boston’s defense slowed Orlando’s perimeter players, Kendrick Perkins and friends have played the mighty Dwight Howard man-up pretty well. Everything is going the Celtics way…

Except for the schedule. Three days off again.

Frankly, it’s just not much to worry about. The Celtics are coming home and it’s much more likely they sweep the Celtics than lose four out of five.

But the Magic remain a dangerous team. They did not get an invite straight to this round, they swept out two teams to get here (including a Hawks team that had a better record than the Celtics). Ignore them and start thinking about the Lakers at your own peril. What you don’t want to do is have a game that gives the Magic hope.

At home, Boston can try to push the pace a little on offense — get some turnovers and have Rajon Rondo convert that to easy buckets. At home, the Celtics role players should step up and provide more. They should get some bench play.

Defensively… don’t change a thing. Keep the Magic in the halfcourt, play Howard with just one man (who cares if he scores 30 again?) and stay home on the perimeter shooters. Don’t let them start driving into the lane for easy buckets, keep defending the rim.

Just keep doing what they have been doing. And keep momentum on their side.

NBA Playoffs Celtics Magic Game 3: Rashard Lewis and the last, best hope for the Magic


Lewis_Celtics.jpgFans, the media, your local bartender, pretty much everybody is shoveling dirt on the Orlando Magic. They are not only down 2-0 in the Eastern Conference Finals, they lost their first two games at home. Orlando has to go into Boston and win, and the Celtics don’t have all those banners hanging overhead because they lose a lot at home in the playoffs.

But the Magic can win, it is not an impossibility. It’s a longshot, a crazy longshot, but Boston sports teams have blown plenty of sure
things over the years.. It’s just that a few things need to happen.

That starts with Rashard Lewis. And if he doesn’t start with him it will end with him.

His role in this series was to pull Kevin Garnett and his amazing help defense away from the paint — hit threes and force Garnett to come out and get him. Lewis is 1 of 9 from three in two games. By the second game, Garnett was willing to lose him in the half court and let the rotations — a couple times the not fleet-of-foot Big Baby — make the run-out at Lewis. Garnett is leaving him; the Celtics do not fear him.

It is a favorite point of Kelly Dwyer at Ball Don’t Lie and he is dead-on — if Rashard Lewis isn’t hitting shots, he hurts the Magic because he doesn’t do much else. He’s not a good rebounder for a four (something you sacrifice because he wants to be on the perimeter) and he is not a great defender. (To be fair, Garnett is just 9 of 30 shooting through two games, on that end Lewis is holding up his end of the bargain,)

Lewis needs some confidence — maybe he needs to get going by putting the ball on the floor and getting a couple layups. He needs a bucket, he needs to get going. Because if the Magic are to have any hope, Lewis has to drain the three — he is a stretch four for a reason. If he does, things open up for Jameer Nelson and Vince Carter driving the lane. If not, Game 3 will look a lot like the first two.

The other thing the Magic need to do — what they have been working on in practice — is taking away the easy transition buckets for the Celtics. Rajon Rondo loves to push the pace and probe after turnovers and misses, and the Celtics have picked up some easy buckets that way. It has been a decider in close games.

At the same time, the Magic and Nelson need to turn the tables — create some turnovers of their own and get a few easy baskets. Buckets are hard to come by against these Celtics in the halfcourt, but they struggled this season against teams like the Hawks that could create turnovers and finish in transition. The Magic need a little of that.

Do all that and the Magic can make a comeback this series. They can. Really. Thing is, the Magic need to do it today in Game 3.

If they lose this one, we can all pick up a shovel and start throwing dirt on them.

NBA Playoffs, Magic v. Celtics: Matt Barnes says what we already know about Paul Pierce


There are various degrees of flopping. There are players that “flop” strictly as a way to exaggerate contact in order to get a call they rightfully deserve. There are others who flop as a way to validate a smart play, like when the how every player that draws a charge isn’t just knocked over, but sent sliding across the floor. Then there are those who create fouls from nothing, and through a scream of pain, a flailing of limbs, and often a fall, some players are able to completely manipulate the referees into seeing something that flat-out didn’t happen.

Then on another level entirely is Baron Davis’ flop against Mehmet Okur in 2007, which is just tremendous.

Paul Pierce is a fantastic player, but the infuriating thing about him is that he stands (or falls?) amongst the most egregious floppers. It’s one thing for Paul to exaggerate a bump on the way to the rim, but the way he collapses on the floor after minimal incidental contact or pretends to be hit in the head while shooting seems like it should be beneath him. He’s honestly too good of a player to be compensating like that.

Matt Barnes, who has become intimately familiar with Pierce’s…gamesmanship, talked a bit about Paul and his ability to manufacture foul calls. From Tania Ganguli of the Orlando Sentinel:

Pierce can be a maddening player for opposing teams.

His ability to score and to draw fouls are among his strengths. Both
California guys, Barnes knows Pierce’s game well. And while some of
Pierce’s antics annoy Barnes, he said he doesn’t “go for” some of what
Pierce tries to do, he couldn’t deny Pierce’s effectiveness.

“My third foul in the third quarter, when I tried to beat him over
the screen, he fell down like I threw him,” Barnes said, when asked
about Pierce’s tendency to exaggerate contact. “It was ridiculous. But
the refs called it, so it was a good play. It was a flop, 100 percent,
and that’s how some guys like to play. But if the refs call it, it’s

Barnes’ quote applies more to a singular incident of Pierce’s flopping than a general trend, but his point stands. However, that doesn’t mean I’m here on a holy crusade to rid the world of the flopping abomination. That’s the problem, actually. No matter how much we rant and rave, there isn’t a convenient solution to get rid of this kind of play. Pierce will continue to go on rewarded for what he does, and there’s really not much the NBA can do about it.

Start giving technical fouls for flopping? Well, that relies on refs correctly identifying the flopping in the first place in the course of a game, which they’re clearly not doing. Fine players for flopping? It can be obvious like in that Baron Davis clip, but there’s pretty much no bright line on what constitutes flopping, and assessing who’s to be fined would be a hell of a judgment call.

Rather it’s just to reference what Paul is doing, shake my head in disgust, and maybe even laugh at him a bit. There are players in this league who need to sell calls in order to elevate their value and earn their next big payday. Pierce is not such a player, and it’s interesting to note that despite Paul’s hubris, he still thinks he needs to be.