Tag: Boston Cleveland Game 5

Vince Carter says he can relate to LeBron James. Maybe the words LeBron least wanted to hear.


nba_Carter.jpgLeBron has taken a mountain of, um, well, fertilizer for his performance in Game 5.

Vince Carter feels for him, as he told the Orlando Sentinel. And when Vince Carter feels for you…

“It’s a tough situation to be in when you want to be, when you are the best player in the league. Which he probably is. To take the scrutiny, it’s tough. For a guy like that, to probably be the first time to have this happen to him, it’s tough. Who better to talk to him than Shaq? Shaq’s been there.

“It’s one of those things where you kind of have to find and navigate your way through sometimes. I think he’s going to be fine. It’s just one game, I know it’s a big series, but he’s done so much for the league, the team the city to where I think the support is still there. I would think so. He’s still pretty darn good on his worst night.”

Vince Carter has taken plenty of fertilizer, most of it he brought on himself. Not that anything he said was really wrong, it’s just when Vince Carter can relate to the amount of crap you get… well you got a lot.

Understanding the intricacies of LeBron's Game 5 letdown


lebron celtics game 5.pngLeBron James had a rough Tuesday night. He shot 3-of-14 from the field as his team struggled to escape from under the heel of the Boston Celtics. Cleveland lost by 32 points on their home court, and when that happens to the best team in the league (record-wise, at least) boasting the best player in the league, the people will demand answers.

How could this happen? And why?

The how part is slightly easier to figure out, as behind LeBron’s very poor performance was a team of highly-paid bystanders. James had an off-night in terms of execution, focus, and effort, but this team is theoretically constructed to withstand that. In fact, plenty of players are being compensated very well to ensure that this very thing doesn’t happen. The acquisitions of Shaquille O’Neal and Antawn Jamison were supposed to make this situation avoidable, yet when James turned in a sub-par game on the Cavs home court, those teammates — which were rumored to be a championship-level cast — vanished as well.

For further analysis on that topic, I’ll defer to FanHouse’s Tom Ziller:

Completely putting the blame on LeBron here…masks very real issues. The Celtics play absurdly good defense and match up particularly well against James. Williams can’t guard a single person on the Boston roster. Jamison, O’Neal, Anderson Varejao and Zydrunas Ilgauskas still aren’t comfortable with each other on offense or defense, and the Celtics’ scorers are hitting some tough shots in this series. It’s not like LeBron is shooting 3-14 against folding chairs. Boston had the league’s No. 5 defense this season, despite a year filled with injuries to key cogs. And with so few Cavaliers scoring with any efficiency, the Celtics have been able to send two good defenders at LeBron as soon as he makes his move. (Despite that, James had 12 free throws and seven assists Tuesday.)

On one hand, it’s tough to entirely blame those, like Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski, who set out to crucify James after they witnessed him make frequent defensive mistakes, float on the offensive end, and hoist his fair share of errant jumpers. He’s the best player in the sport, and he’s supposed to play accordingly in the playoffs.

Ziller notes that LeBron’s Game 5 isn’t as simple as many media reactions indicate, and he’s right; to deny the significance of Boston’s defensive brilliance and the futility of James’ teammates is to ignore a crucial part of the story here.

The Celtics are no slouches on the defensive end, and while their first round series against the Heat may not have provided the best example given Miami’s limited offense, the enduring effectiveness of Boston’s D over the course of the regular season is beyond commendable. There was no question they were going to turn basketball from play into work for LeBron, and they’ve done just that.

Ultimately, the best way to properly address James’ night may be to show rather than tell. Kevin Arnovitz did just that over at TrueHoop. Others could watch that very video and see  justification for their verbal lashings of LeBron, the pariah, but I see a guy that’s just completely out of sync. His passes were off to an irregular degree, his shooting troublesome, and his focus waning. It’s easy to maintain that focus when your team is in control of the game, but with neither the Cavs or LeBron clicking, he floated.

It happens. He deserves to be criticized for it, just not drawn and quartered. Being the best in the world doesn’t remove the possibility of having a bad game — mentally as well as physically — at an inopportune time, and that’s what we all witnessed last night.


So LeBron, what do you have to say for yourself?

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Last night was perplexing.

LeBron James was almost an afterthought in the Cavs offense. He missed some early jumpers, but rather than adjust and drive the lane (something he does better than anyone in the league) he was just floating around on the weakside, He was not aggressive and seemed disinterested. Was it the elbow? A mindset?

Hear it from the man himself. Although his press conference was not much better than his game.


NBA Playoffs, Cavaliers Celtics Game 5: Rajon Rondo is going to think this is a hockey game

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Rondo_Cavs.jpgWe don’t know much about what the Cleveland Cavaliers have planned to stop the Rajon Rondo layup parade — none of their key players have spoken to the media for a couple days. Mike Brown has chosen not to tell the national media the details of his plans. Smart man.

But we can infer, from the words of the coaches and past actions. LeBron said after last game he wants a shot on Rondo, but it’s not so simple because that means Mo Williams has to cover Ray Allen or Paul Pierce and the Celtics will exploit that matchup. Maybe you want to dare the slumping Pierce to get hot, but your risk waking up the dragon with that one.

As John Krolik pointed out here yesterday, the Cavaliers need to do a much better job of shutting off the transition and early offense points Rondo gets. Take away the uncontested layups. That starts with keeping him off the boards — 18 rebounds? How do you let a guard do that? — because that fueled the transition points.

Put simply: Cleveland needs to put a body on Rondo. Bang him around a little. Make this a physical game. Whether that is LeBron or Anthony Parker or Big Z doesn’t matter.

Last game, Rondo just swooped in for his rebounds. He was not boxed out; nobody really gave him much thought. They will tonight. He will have bodies in his way an he will be leaping over people for his boards, not grabbing uncontested ones.

The Cavaliers should also shadow him down the court off misses, as opposed to letting him get up a full head of steam. Then get LeBron or a big man back to patrol the paint. No gimme layups.

Bottom line, Rondo is not going to find it so easy. He is going to get banged around like a pinball. There are risks for Cleveland with this, mostly foul trouble. Rondo will still drive and while it’s hard to draw the contact and sell foul on LeBron because of his strength, he only needs one or two calls. Then LeBron has to sit and… Cleveland doesn’t want that.

Still, don’t expect Rondo to have the same night. Somebody — and Pierce, we’re looking at you — has to step up and take on some of that scoring for Boston. One of the Big 3, because we can’t really expect 28 out of Kendrick Perkins, now can we?

Something’s gotta give in this one. We may have the best game of the playoffs here (Atlanta/Milwaukee Game 7 didn’t quite live up to the billing).