Tag: Blazers


Earth to Houston: LaMarcus Aldridge is a problem. Is Howard the answer?


Earth to Houston: LaMarcus Aldridge is a problem.

That bit of information is obvious to the most junior of fans, but Kevin McHale and three-time Defensive Player of the Year Dwight Howard have yet to get the memo.

Howard finished ninth in this year’s DPOY voting and probably deserved to finish somewhere in that ballpark.  But he and McHale have yet to embrace the challenge that Aldridge presents by allowing Howard to put those defensive skills to work.

Out of 80 possessions we tracked in Game 2, Howard was called upon to defend Aldridge just 25 times. Most of the remaining defensive possessions went to Omer Asik, who clocked in at 51 assignments, with the remaining four going to Terrence Jones and Chandler Parsons. About a third of Asik’s covers happened with Howard off the floor, and Asik dominated the fourth quarter covers.

Make no mistake, hitting 18-of-28 shots in Game 2 it didn’t matter who was covering Aldridge – he was torching them. He beat Howard on 5-of-6 challenges and the only thing that saved Asik was a series of eight consecutive misses by Aldridge – though the tape would show it had less to do with Asik than it did the fact that mere mortals can’t make every shot. Prior to that Asik gave up points or fouls on 9-of-10 chances against Portland’s big man.

Any way you slice it, with Aldridge averaging just under 45 points per game so far and setting records for his fast start, something has to change. Kevin McHale would prefer to keep Howard on Robin Lopez in order to protect the defensive glass, and a close second to that is keeping Howard out of foul trouble. But desperate times call for desperate measures, and being down 2-0 heading into Portland tonight would fall into that bucket.

On the other end of the floor, the Rockets have spent considerable time using Howard against Lopez on offense, and true to season-long form that has been productive for them. But in Game 2 the Rockets’ pair of wings in James Harden (6-of-19 FGs) and Chandler Parsons (5-of-15 FGs) didn’t get many easy looks as a result of it. While Howard’s offensive game has improved this season, it’s still not to the point where it consistently makes players around him better. Taking a page out of everybody’s book against the big man, the Blazers are more than willing to let Howard beat them if it means that threes aren’t raining on their heads.

Playoff adjustments usually determine the winner in a closely-matched series. If Howard is the defensive player many folks say he is, it goes without saying that the Rockets need to go all-in with the superstar assignment. Aldridge isn’t going to continue shooting at his current high-volume 60 percent from the field, but one more big game tonight and the series is all-but over.

Even though Howard is facing-up Lopez at will, the Rockets would be wise to open up the game plan by unleashing Harden and Parsons with high pick-and-roll action, since both guys are having a hard time getting penetration against sturdy defenders Wes Matthews and Nicolas Batum. If Howard is the defensive player folks make him out to be, he should be both willing and able to make his matchup with Aldridge a wash. With Patrick Beverley effectively slowing down Damian Lillard, and Howard theoretically doing the same to Aldridge, the rest of the Rockets’ pieces should be able to outscore their Portland counterparts.

But Houston has it backwards right now, saving Howard for offense when he is needed on defense. It begs the question of whether or not McHale believes he can answer the call against Aldridge. If he can’t, it may be time to re-evaluate where he stands in the league’s defensive pecking order.

Today in miserable, miserable Greg Oden news: Greg Oden is not healthy enough to have surgery yet

Greg Oden

From the invaluable Blazersedge comes this nugget of awful news about Greg Oden:

Blazers Acting GM Chad Buchanan: After 2 weeks, C Greg Oden is still not cleared medically for L knee surgery because of ankle blood clots

From the sound of that, it could be a long while before the #1 pick in the 2007 draft is actually playing basketball again. Hopefully Oden can make an NBA return at some point down the line, but the day will come soon when the Blazers will have to decide how long they want to keep their ultra-talented but stunningly brittle young center, especially since he’s still making good money.

Raymond Felton would like to sign an extension with the Blazers

Ray Felton
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From Hoopsworld’s Lang Greene:

At the end of this season the Blazers will once again have to make a major decision regarding their backcourt, as Felton is in the last year of his current deal and is set to become a free agent.

Felton readily lets it be known if the decision were up to him, he would be donning a Trail Blazers uniform over the long term.

“They [Blazers officials] know I want to be here,” Felton told HOOPSWORLD. “I’ve told them that and we talked about it earlier in the summer so they know that already. I love it here in Portland. I want to be here leading the team. I feel like we have a winning team here, so hopefully we can get something done.”

If Felton wants a long-term deal with the Blazers or any other team, he’s either going to have to take a large pay cut or start playing a lot better. The 27-year old Felton currently has a career-low PER of 10.31, which is well below the league average of 15, his true shooting percentage is an abysmal 41.8%, and his turnover rate is also worse than it has ever been before. And his salary for this season is 7.6 million dollars.

Felton says that adjusting to a new team after the lockout has been tough, but even if he “returns to form” it’s debatable whether he’s worth anywhere near 8 million dollars a year, especially as he gets closer to 30 — the 09-10 season and 10-11 season were the only ones where Felton’s PER was above 15, and he’s never been a particularly efficient scorer, even in Denver’s offense-driven system. It’s understandable that Felton wants some job security going forward, but it’s tougher to understand why any team would want to give Felton a long-term deal that pays anywhere near his current yearly salary.