Tag: Ben Wallace

Tyreke Evans, Dwight Howard

Dwight Howard thought he should have won DPOY last year


Dwight Howard was the three-time defending NBA Defensive Player of the Year going into last season.

But there was no four-peat. Howard had a messy off-the-court season in Orlando that he should want to forget, plus he finished the season injured. Tyson Chandler won the award for his fantastic play in the paint that turned the woeful Knicks defensive into the fifth best in the league. Howard finished third in the voting, behind Serge Ibaka of the Thunder, but ahead of LeBron James and Kevin Garnett.

Howard thinks he was robbed. He thinks he deserved it last year and it was how people felt about him leaving Orlando that played a role in him not winning, he told ESPNLA.com.

“I thought I should have won it last year, to be honest with you,” Howard told reporters after practice Monday. “I was a little bit upset about that….

“I felt like I did my job to win it. I also feel like I didn’t because of the whole situation,” Howard said, referring to the uncertainty surrounding his future with the Magic and the distraction it became. “That played a factor in it.”

I don’t think Howard is totally wrong, people not liking his situation played a role, but it is more than just that.

There was the fact that while he played well (2.1 blocks per game, league best 14.5 rebounds per game) the Magic defense was not as good, slipping to 13th in the league in points allowed per possession (tied with the Lakers). There was the fact he missed the end of the season injured. There was the fact he’d won it three years running and when anybody wins an award that often voters tend to get fatigue and look elsewhere. Finally, there was the fact Chandler had a great defensive season as the anchor of a defense that had been terrible and became good. Plus, Chandler did that in New York, on a bright stage where everybody saw it.

Howard is on a big, bright stage now with a Lakers team that had a pretty average defense last season. Talk to people around the team and they think it is Howard’s defense that is the biggest change he brings to this team.

Howard says he wants his award back, he wants to win a fourth DPOY. That would tie him with Ben Wallace and Dikembe Mutombo for most in a career with four. If he can cover up some of Steve Nash’s defense at the point he deserves to be in the mix.

‘Sheed talks about why he chose Knicks (try Mike Woodson)

NBA Finals Game 7:  Boston Celtics v Los Angeles Lakers

Rasheed Wallace is back in the NBA. Which should be a good test of the NBA’s technical policy if nothing else.

He’s had a few other chances to return from retirement the past two years, a number of teams including the Celtics (where he last played) have approached him. He said no. He didn’t want to come back.

But he has this season with the Knicks, and he talked with the New York Times about why. And the why is coach Mike Woodson.

It was Woodson, perhaps with perfect timing, who called Wallace in May. That was the same month the Knicks removed his interim title. “He asked me if I still wanted to play,” Wallace said of Woodson, who coached him as an assistant in Detroit. “It meant a lot that Coach Woodson still has that feeling that I can be a positive influence on this team.”

Woodson was an assistant coach on the 2004 Pistons team that won the NBA title with Wallace. That is where their bond formed.

“You know with myself being a hothead and with Ben Wallace, the way he was, Coach Woodson kept us calm,” Wallace said. “He was the one that quieted the storm.”

How much Wallace can help remains to be seen. The Knicks start Tyson Chandler at the five and Amare Stoudemire at the four, then bring Marcus Camby, Kurt Thomas and they plan to use Carmelo Anthony some at the four like Team USA did this summer. (Also, Steve Novak can be a stretch four if you want.) There are minutes to be had but Wallace has to earn them because Woodson has options.

But ‘Sheed is back in the league and ready to rack up some technical. And points.

A very honest Daryl Morey talks Rockets, Lin, 2004 Pistons


Daryl Morey is a geek. In a good way. And I’m not just saying that because he clearly knows his way around Reddit. Well, that is part of the reason.

But clearly he does. Morey did an IAMA on Reddit Friday — which for the uninitiated is kind of an online Q&A — and in this comfortable setting he was honest. And witty. And worth reading. Check out the entire thing, be a Reddit lurker. But here are what I saw as the highlights.

Starting with: Which is the most intimidating team in the NBA?

Miami. I have consistently said this since the team was assembled

About his push this summer to land an elite player (Dwight Howard, for one) on the Rockets.

You definitely need at least 1 elite player in the top 10-20 of all NBA players (all-star level) to win the championship. There are no counter examples of this. We are not championship contenders right now. All our moves since Yao Ming went down have had the specific goal of acquiring a top level player since that moment. Each change on our team has been designed to acquire players who either have a chance to be an all-star or give us the cap room or trade flexibility to acquire an all-star.

Wait, what about the 2004 Pistons? They didn’t have a superstar/elite player?

(Chauncey) Billups and Ben Wallace clearly were playing at an all-star level in my opinion at that time. Also, 4(!) of them made the all-star team either that year or the next. For those wondering on Ben Wallace, they had the #1 defense in the league and Ben Wallace was for sure the primary reason for it. Omer Asik has the potential to play at an all-star level on defense. We will see if he does.

Well, can Jeremy Lin be that All-Star/elite player?

We were rolling the dice on getting Jeremy Lin but taking smart risks is what we have to do up and down the roster on every move. As only 1 team out of 30 gets to win, you cannot play it safe. A fund manager who beats more than half his peers and beats the S+P 500 is considered pretty good. We have won more games than we lost the past few years (beaten our peers) despite losing our franchise player Yao Ming and it has been appropriately considered disappointing despite the fact that most teams win around one-third of their games after losing their franchise player. We need to keep taking on more smart risk.

What about the trend of small ball? Is there a place for a traditional big man in the NBA?

For sure in the regular season, the general rule of thumb to help you win is put your 5 best players on the floor as much as possible. Because of scarcity, the smalls are generally better than the bigs and also more numerous. This is why “small ball” works.

If you wonder why the media seems to love Morey, it’s not just that we think he makes smart moves, it’s that he is open and honest about what is going on more than most. Honesty is appreciated by all of us (well, until someone runs for political office).