Tag: Baron Davis

Baron Davis, Jason Richardson, Corey Maggette

Video: Baron Davis’ British alter ego interviews himself


Baron Davis is having a lot of fun during the Olympics making videos with his English alter ego Brian Davies, so he decided to interview himself. With such questions as “Who wins a race between Michael Phelps and a hammerhead shark?”

Enjoy. It’s only Tuesday, so you could use a laugh to start off your morning.

Hat tip to I am a GM for finding this.

Video: Baron Davis, Swin Cash debate men’s vs. women’s basketball

Baron Davis, Jason Richardson, Corey Maggette

I’m going to miss Baron Davis when he is out of the league. Not so much Baron Davis the player capable of lighting up an arena like few others of his era, that Davis has been gone for a while now. I’ve come to peace with it.

But Davis the guy who puts together amusing videos? That Davis I’m going to miss. This is pretty amusing, and good of Swin Cash to play along. And love the nod to Michael Phelps.

Hat tip to SLAM.

Check out Baron Davis’ new video game “Getting Buckets”

baron davis

That, my friends, is the trailer for “Getting Buckets,” the new mobile video game Baron Davis has helped produce. And by helped I don’t mean “sat at a laptop and pounded out code” I mean more like he tried to do the big picture stuff. He’s an idea man.

But he was in on this from the ground floor. SLAM spoke to him and the game designer about it.

Adds (game designer Sean) O’Brien: “The first vision that Baron had was to create something accessible. He didn’t want to do a simulation game where there are a lot of controls that you have to try to master. He wanted casual fans to be able to pick up their iPhone or iPad or iPod Touch and just be able to play and interact with the athlete. And we really felt there was an opening in mobile gaming.”

The goal of the game, which was designed as a 3-D, “endless-runner,” is for users to collects as many “buckets” as they can while dribbling through the game’s different levels (East Coast, West Coast, South Beach and Hoosier Country) with whichever basketball player they choose to play with. The athletes—Steve Nash, Rajon Rondo, Brandon Jennings and Candace Parker—were all handpicked, and recruited by Davis. Social media savvy and on-the-court creativity were the required credentials.

As TBJ aptly noted, it’s very Baron Davis to want a game where things come naturally and you don’t have to spend a lot of time mastering the fine details of how to make it work better. I’m sure you can also do it while doing a variety of knee rehab assignments. (Davis and O’Brien met while Davis was doing injury rehab. Don’t ask which one, I couldn’t keep track.)
Still, I’ve played worse looking games.

Winderman: Lin’s offer sheet not problem, Knicks entire payroll is

New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin and Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony looks on against the Atlanta Hawks in the second quarter of their NBA basketball game at Madison Square Garden in New York

This is where many get the NBA luxury tax wrong: The third year on the offer sheet extended by the Rockets to Jeremy Lin will not cost the Knicks $43 million when factoring in the luxury tax, as some have extrapolated.

It will cost the Knicks the $15 million on the third year of that contract.

The excess payroll will cost the Knicks $43 million.

And that is a point executives familiar with such situations are quick to point out: Just because a player is the last, or latest, contract added to a team’s salary pool, it doesn’t make it the one that puts the team into — in this case, excessively into — the luxury tax.

It is the sum of the entire payroll.

For now, the debate in New York, and among Lin-sanity observers elsewhere, is whether the Knicks can afford to retain Lin amid such a huge potential luxury-tax hit.

But that also overlooks the bigger picture, that by trading for Carmelo Anthony’s huge salary, by signing Amare Stoudemire to such an excessive salary and by putting so much cash into Tyson Chandler’s limited game, the next big salary on the Knicks’ books was always going to be the one that was going to lead to luxury-tax Armageddon.

The Knicks forestalled the initial hit by using an amnesty claim with Chauncey Billups before last season. They then thought they could get by on the cheap at point guard when Baron Davis came along at a minimal salary.

And then Lin-sanity ensued (in retrospect, if only it had been Bibby-sanity . . .).

In 2014-15, the season of excess in the Rockets’ offer sheet to Lin, Anthony and Stoudemire each will be earning $23 million, with Chandler earning $15 million.

That is why the tax is an issue.

Of course, if Lin is retained, an argument could be made about Raymond Felton’s salary not only contributing to the excessive tax overage, but being unnecessary.

With the NBA moving away from offensively limited big men, moving Chandler won’t be easy. With so many injury issues, you can just about forget about moving Stoudemire’s uninsurable deal. And Anthony is the supposed cornerstone.

If those three are the core, then the Knicks just move on from Lin.

But it’s not Lin’s contract, alone, that has created such pause. It’s all the contracts. Collectively. Knicks-sanity, if you will.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at @IraHeatBeat.

NBA Summer League’s second day features plethora of solid performances

Houston Rockets v Memphis Grizzlies
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LAS VEGAS — The second day of NBA Summer League featured pretty the same things as the first — random cameos in the crowd by established NBA like Baron Davis, J.R. Smith and David Lee; a lot of less than stellar basketball interspersed with jaw-dropping highlights and 32 quarters of players most of the crowd in attendance has never heard of fighting to better their basketball careers.

Not everybody in attendance was able to dominate like they probably planned, but plenty of players put together solid enough performances to be included in our Day 2 bullets featuring the best — and some of the worst — players  for packed house in Las Vegas.

  • The entire Memphis Grizzlies team played well to begin things on Friday afternoon against the New York Knicks. The team’s last two first-round picks and seemingly career combo guards — Josh Selby and Tony Wroten — played stifling defense while combining for 39 points. They weren’t the only standouts, though, as current free agent Matt Janning also played very well with 13 points, four rebounds and even a block as he looks to once again parlay a successful Summer League performance into an NBA contract as he did his rookie season with the Phoenix Suns.
  • Josh Akognon has been tearing up China since leaving Cal State Fullerton, but there are very people in NBA circles familiar with his game. He showed quite a bit on Saturday, though, as he scored 25 points and nailed four 3-pointers … though the 5-foot-9 guard failed to record an assist.
  • Bradley Beal is the player most people figured would be a standout for the Washington Wizards’ Summer League entry, but it ended up being second round pick Tomas Satoransky stealing the show on Saturday night. Satoransky’s Wizards would go on to win a blowout over the Houston Rockets, but the young point guard played very solid on his way to 10 points — including a pair of dunks that would dispell some of the criticisms that he’s not athletic enough to play in America’s top league. Beal still finished better than him in the box score, however, scoring 14 points to go with five rebounds and four assists.
  • The Rockets-Wizards game was a blowout, but the two team’s young power forwards didn’t make that evident over the course of the game. Marcus Morris and Chris Singleton had to be separated at one point after a war of words and then later rookie Royce White and Singleton also exchanged some words. None of the three turned in particularly incredible performances, but it was fun to see some passion in Vegas.
  • Jeremy Lamb wasn’t overtly-amazing considering he made just two of his seven 3-pointers — and one of those misses was an airball — but he finished with 23 points in the points column. Fellow rookie Terrence Jones was quite a bit more efficient with 13 points on eight shots in 18 minutes.
  • Donatas Motiejunas didn’t look nearly as good on Saturday as he did on Friday. The Rockets big man of the future finished his second game in America with just one point after missing all five of his field goal attempts — and getting abused by Garret Siler a few times on the defensive end.
  • The majority of the Knicks looked like they had less than NBA talent, but former Memphis wing Wesley Witherspoon was able to put together a solid game with 15 points and five rebounds off the bench. It was more than most expected following a disappointing college career, but he did have one major blemish in the game — an air-balled 3-pointer that drew just the faintest chants of “Airball!” from a still-building crowd.
  • Klay Thompson got off to an impeccably-hot start on Saturday as he seemed to be on his way to cementing a Summer League MVP performance with 12 early points as he nailed the first four 3-pointers he attempted. The second-year pro for the Golden State Warriors wasn’t able to sustain that success, however, and finished with just 17 points to go with six turnovers and five fouls — though his 4-of-6 performance from beyond the arc didn’t hurt. Charles Jenkins was probably the best player on his team as he scored 24 points whereas Harrison Barnes took a stepback in scoring just 13 points on 5-of-17 shooting.
  • The Denver Nuggets look like they brought a Summer League All-Star team to Vegas, but they weren’t able to play like that for the majority of Saturday’s game. Jordan Hamilton had an amazing second quarter on his way to 18 points and a huge dunk (that led to him saluting opponent Draymond Green), but the remainder of his performance wasn’t quite as impressive. His veteran teammates weren’t all that impressive, either.
  • Kenneth Faried scored 10 points and had a series of three huge blocks, his 4-of-15 performance from the field can’t be sugarcoated while former first round picks Solomon Alabi and Gani Lawal combined for just six points and six rebounds in 20 minutes of playing time.

Games will continue to get more interesting on Sunday as games start to be played at both the Cox Pavilion and Thomas & Mack Center leading to even more possible standouts at NBA Summer League — and we’ll have a recap of all of them available for you right here at Pro Basketball Talk.