Tag: bad contracts


Report: NBA proposes franchise tag, non-guaranteed contracts


The proposal the NBA owners presented the NBA players union late last month would do away with fully-guaranteed contracts and adds a style of franchise tag, one that is different than the NFL’s but new to the NBA, reports Zach Lowe at Sports Illustrated.

Both would be a radical shift from the current collective bargaining agreement. It’s a proposal the players have said they do not like.

Contract guarantees could be a real sticking point. Currently, most longer contracts in the NBA are fully guaranteed (they don’t have to be, non-guaranteed years or a buyout clause can be negotiated as part of the deal, which  has happened in the case of Lamar Odom, Marcus Camby and others), so when you make a bad deal to sign Eddy Curry long term you or someone has to pay the man. All of it.

Sources also said the league’s proposal would ban fully guaranteed contracts. All contracts would have limits on the amount of money a player would be guaranteed to receive, and those guarantees would decline during the life of each contract. In other words, a player making, say, $5 million per season over four seasons would actually be guaranteed less than $5 million in each of those four seasons — and the amount guaranteed would drop each season. The idea is for teams to be able to get out of undesirable contacts more easily and avoid ugly Eddy Curry-style buyout talks.

That makes financial sense for the owners, and you can see why the players would oppose it. On one hand it would make it easier for franchises to erase mistakes and restructure their rosters — they could get out of salary cap hell faster — something fans would like. But if you do something stupid — say, offer Joe Johnson a six-year max deal — shouldn’t there be a price to pay as a franchise? Why should an owner/GM do something stupid and have a “get out of jail free” card to go with it?

Then there is the franchise tag.

The inability of Cleveland to retain LeBron James and Toronto to retain Chris Bosh scared a lot of mid-to-small market NBA owners, who wondered if they were every lucky enough to get a real star via the lottery would they be able to keep the player. That is why some owners have pushed for a form of the tag.

But what the NBA has proposed is different than the NFL version. The NFL franchise tag takes that player off the market, he is locked into his team with a top five salary at his position.

Instead, a team would be allowed to designate one player for preferential contractual treatment, including more overall money, more guaranteed money and at least one extra year on his contract. A player would have to agree to such a designation. It is designed to work as an incentive to get a player to remain with his team rather than as a roadblock to free agency, the sources said.

Take the situation between the Cavaliers and LeBron James one year ago. Under the league’s proposal, the Cavaliers would not have been able to unilaterally “tag” James a franchise player and bind him to the team for one more season. The Cavaliers would have been able to offer James various enticements he may not have been able to get from other teams, the sources said.

The NBA’s existing CBA already allows this to a degree, teams a player is with can offer more than other teams. In the case of James, the Cavaliers did offer larger raises and one more year on the deal, which would have totaled about $27 million more over the life of the deal. It wasn’t enough. That is why a shotgun sign-and-trade took place, so James could get those larger raises (although he took a smaller base salary and less overall money to leave).

But in a world with non-guaranteed contracts, the incentives that do guarantee more money could be a stronger lure to keep players with teams.

Which has always been a goal of the NBA. They realize the value of having Tim Duncan always being a Spur or Kobe Bryant always being a Laker. While those men should have the ability to test the market, the league benefits in marketing from having its stars be stable with a franchise.

The answers are not simple. And it’s going to take a long time for these two sides to get on the same page. But at least they are talking.

Winderman: What other onerous contracts could be traded?

Portland Trail Blazers v Los Angeles Clippers
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Well, the Magic, Wizards and Suns showed us, didn’t they? More to the point, they shut us up.

“No one is taking on Gilbert’s deal.”

“The Magic aren’t unloading Rashard’s contract.”

“The Suns are stuck with Turkoglu.”

We all either said it or thought it. For years, the crutch in shooting down the wildest trade permutations was that there simply were some contracts in a salary-cap world that were untradeable. Or so we were lead to believe.

Instead, in the spirit of the season, Orlando, Washington and Phoenix got involved in a bit of re-gifting. The lesson to us all is that apparently anyone can be moved with a little creativity and a lot of equivalent desperation.

So picking up where the Magic, Wizards and Suns left off, we look at a few other deals heretofore believed to be immobile.

Luol Deng, Bulls: Including this season, four years at $51.3 million remain. The Nuggets apparently had no interest during the early rounds of Carmelo talks, but for a suitor that otherwise would be unable to lure talent in free agency, there is value there. With the Bulls so deep into Carlos Boozer and Joakim Noah, and soon Derek Rose, there will be a need to sort things out.

Anderson Varejao, Cavaliers: Including this season, five seasons at $43.1 million remain. The money is a bit extreme for a complementary piece, and what the Cavaliers need at this stage is a post presence more than a hustle player. It would behoove just about every contender to consider the possibilities.

Brendan Haywood, Mavericks: Including this season, five seasons at $41.7 million remain. Dallas made the offer this summer when Haywood was viewed as a starter, a role he no longer fills with the Mavericks. But it is a role he could possibly fill elsewhere.

Richard Hamilton, Pistons: Including this season, three seasons at $35.5 million remain. He wants out and the Pistons have little need for a disgruntled scorer on the downside. At $12.5 million, he is a bit pricy to be utilized as a reserve by a contender, but could be swapped in a deal for another team’s headache.

Baron Davis, Clippers: Including this season, three seasons at $41.7 million remain. Speaking of another team’s headache, the Clippers need to make this go away sooner rather than later. At this point, Davis has to play himself into a trade, show there still is something there.

Travis Outlaw, Nets: Including this season, five seasons at $35 million remain. Well, that didn’t take long, did it? Now the challenge is searching for another 2010 offseason signing that soured just as quickly elsewhere.

Elton Brand, 76ers: Including this season, three seasons at $51.2 million remain. For our money, we make this the new clubhouse leader as the league’s current most untradeable contract.

Josh Childress, Suns: Including this season, five seasons at $33.5 million remain. Can they coax him back to Greece?

Jose Calderon, Raptors: Including this season, three seasons at $29.3 million remain. And who exactly thought this was a $10 million player? The Raptors have been trying to push him out seemingly since the deal was signed.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.