Tag: Anthony Randolph

Denver Nuggets v Portland Trail Blazers

Nuggets have no answer for LaMarcus Aldridge, fall to Trail Blazers


This is how a coaching adjustment can change a game.

In the first half, Ty Lawson was getting into the lane and carving up the Trail Blazers — he had 13 points, nine assists and led Denver to 67 first half points. Portland was getting its offense from LaMarcus Aldridge, who had 14 points in the first 24 minutes (and Wesley Mathews, who had 18 points before the break).

Blazers coach Terry Stotts made an adjustment, sliding the longer Nicolas Batum over to cover Lawson (instead of using Damian Lillard). The result was Lawson going 0-of-5 in the second half with just two assists. Meanwhile Brian Shaw made no adjustments on Aldridge — J.J. Hickson stayed on him and Aldridge went for 30 in the second half, including Portland’s final 15 points.

The result was a 110-105 Portland win in what was an up-tempo, entertaining game.

It’s also a game that summed up these teams two fairly well.

Portland’s defense was an issue in the first half as Denver was able to put up 67 points on 58.5 percent shooting, plus they hit 7-of-12 from three. Nate Robinson was doing his thing and added 13 points and Anthony Randolph had 12.

Portland’s defense just wasn’t that good — and with their offense it doesn’t matter most nights. That may come back to bite them in the playoffs. That said, Portland has defended better of late and did so in the second half of this game — it wasn’t just Batum, it was a team effort that held the Nuggets down.

Denver on the other hand has been hot and cold all season. It happens game-to-game, even quarter to quarter. Once Portland slid Batum on to Lawson there was no second player to create shots and direct the offense. Denver scored 38 points on 39.5 percent shooting in the second half after that monster first half. This has been the story of the Nuggets season. Hot and cold.

In the end, Aldridge got hot, Denver still covered him one-on-one with just Hickson, and the results were what you would expect. Portland picks up another home win and looks like a contender for stretches. And on Thursday night stretches were enough.

JaVale McGee diagnosed with stress fracture in left leg, out indefinitely

JaVale McGee

The Nuggets have struggled their way to a 1-4 start to the season, and things just got worse with the loss of one of the team’s starting big men.

McGee logged just over 12 minutes during Denver’s loss in Phoenix on Friday, after which head coach Brian Shaw let his frustration be known with what he called a lack of energy from some of his core players.

After coming off the bench for all 79 of his appearances last year, McGee has started all five games this season. He’s averaging 7.0 points, 3.4 rebounds and 1.4 blocked shots in just 15.8 minutes per game.

Chris Dempsey of the Denver Post reports that Shaw says he will decide Monday whether he starts Timofey Mozgov or J.J. Hickson in McGee’s place.

Monday And-1 Links: SNL cast member Taran Killam has NBA Jams arcade game in his office

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Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points more than we loved the Breaking Bad finale (and we liked that a lot)….

• Boom Shaka Laka! Saturday Night Live’s Taran Killam has the old NBA Jams arcade in his office at 30 Rock. Seriously. Here is what he told The Verge:

“It was my birthday present to myself last year, and we’re trying to find a place for it. But now it just sorta sits in the middle of our office. Much to the chagrin of my roommates. But it’s also fantastic. I’ve got an NBA Jam arcade machine in my office!”

Killam is my new favorite cast member. He’s on fire.

• Pau Gasol was fine through the entire first day of practice and Steve Nash only sat out the final couple drills, according to reports. In Los Angeles, that counts as good news (rather than just expected news).

• Omer Asik had to leave the first Rockets’ practice early with a strained calf. Not serious, but something to watch.

• In case you missed it, George Karl will be working for ESPN this season (kind of in the Flip Saunders/Kurt Rambis role). I think that could be interesting.

• In Washington, owner Ted Leonsis got a tough question about GM Ernie Grunfeld and backed his man.

• Not that you thought the situation had changed, but Roy Hibbert still really doesn’t like Joakim Noah.

• As expected, the Portland Trail Blazers picked up the 2014-15 options on the contracts of Damian Lillard, Meyers Leonard and Thomas Robinson.

• The Philadelphia 76ers scrimmaged at practice Monday but Spencer Hawes watched it with an ice bag on his left knee.

• Jeff Teague is officially day-to-day with a mildly sprained wrist but is not expected to miss any of the Hawks’ training camp.

• Chicago rookie Tony Snell reportedly has added 18 pounds of muscle since the draft. I saw him at Summer League, 18 pounds would move him up to skinny. He could use a few more lbs.

• Here is Sixers owner Josh Harris talking to CSNPhilly.com about the fact his team is going to suck this year in an effort to get better through the draft:

“I’m not a patient person by nature. I want immediate results and immediate upsides, but I think that the reality of professional sports is things don’t change overnight. There are 29 other owners and everyone is smart and everyone is resourced so it’s all about getting an edge. I think the edge comes from putting the right people in place in management and when we were able to get Sam Hinkie and Scott O’Neill and Brett Brown, these are A-players. I feel very, very excited about those moves.”

• A.J. Price was given an invite to Timberwolves training camp.

• Guard Elliot Williams is at training camp with the Cavaliers,

• We finish with JaVale McGee pranking Anthony Randolph. Just because we can.

Heat don’t scare Pacers

Heat's James and Pacers' Stephenson prepare to play during the fourth quarter in Game 4 of their NBA Eastern Conference Final basketball playoff series in Indianapolis

The Miami Heat have been the most heavily scrutinized team in NBA history, and opponents aren’t immune from getting sucked into the publicity whirlwind. For better or worse, playing the Heat is different than any other game. Some teams, like the Bulls, thrive when facing the challenge. Others, like the Nets, crumble under the pressure.

The Pacers do neither.

Indiana just plays its game.

The Pacers don’t have the most high-end talent among the remaining teams. (That’s the Heat.) The Pacers don’t have the most depth, either. (That’s the Spurs.)

But after winning Tuesday night to even up the East finals at 2-2, Indiana has shown the most resolve in these playoffs.

The Pacers lost back-to-back games to the Hawks by 21 and 11 and won the next game. They lost to the Knicks by 26 and won the next game. They lost again to the Knicks by 10 and won the next game.

Now, after losing to the Heat by 18, Indiana has bounced back again – this time with a 99-92 victory over the Heat in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference Finals.

No team has lost more games by double digits in these playoffs than the Pacers. In fact, Indiana has lost more double-digit games than the other three conference finalists combined.

But these Pacers keep fighting back.

George Hill was part-time starter and part-time sixth man for the San Antonio Spurs at age 23. For a player who spent four seasons playing for a team that sounds like a list of Hoosier State tourist locations – Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis – such a large role at such a young age had to be a dream come true. Then the Spurs traded him to Indiana, a team that went 37-45 the year before and still cut his minutes.

Lance Stephenson was once New York City’s schoolboy star du jour, earning the nickname Born Ready. Then, he faced legal trouble and eligibility questions, spent an OK season at Cincinnati, was drafted in the second round, struggled through his first two NBA seasons and appeared headed out of the league.

Paul George told anyone who would listen that he had sky-high potential; that he could be the next Tracy McGrady. An All-WAC second-team season didn’t exactly prove his upside, but George went pro anyway. He was so focused on the draft, he shared that Fresno State’s losing season actually help him – because he could prepare for the draft while other prospects were still playing in the NCAA Tournament. He went No. 10 – much, much, much higher than anyone would have imagined a year prior. Then, early in his rookie year, after all his hard work to achieve his draft dream, George was regularly receiving DNP-CDs.

David West was so highly regarded at Xavier that he made Sports Illustrated’s All-Decade team with players from more traditional powers Duke and Connecticut. But when it came to the draft, West faced typical questions for a power forward who spent four years in college (size, athleticism, upside) and slipped to 18th in the draft behind luminaries such as Troy Bell, Reece Gaines and Marcus Banks.

Roy Hibbert wasn’t exactly Patrick Ewing or Alonzo Mourning, but Hibbert changed himself from a player who couldn’t do a single push-up into someone who credibly belonged on a list of Georgetown’s great centers. Still, questions about his mobility pushed Hibbert’s draft stock below Joe Alexander, Jason Thompson and Anthony Randolph, down all the way to No. 17.

These players have been hit a lot harder than they were by the Heat in Game 3. The narrative suggested they should crumble at the sight of Miami showing its might, but their personal experiences have given them strength in these difficult situations.

Together, Hill, Stephenson, George, West and Hibbert have grown even stronger, worked even harder, gotten even better. Their resolve has increased. They’re not phased by losing, winning, playing the Heat or anything else.

The Heat could very well still win this series, but they won’t get to the Finals by intimidating Indiana. They’ll have to win on the merits of their play.

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Warriors go on the offensive, dominate Nuggets to even the series

Golden State Warriors v Denver Nuggets - Game Two

The Warriors had a lot of questions surrounding them heading into this game.

How would they adjust to playing without David Lee? Who would start in his place? Would Stephen Curry find his offense? Would anyone else step up?

In order, they answered those accordingly: not much, Jarrett Jack, YES, and YES.

The Warriors put on a clinic in this game, running circles around the Nuggets by shooting an astonishing 64.6% from the field and claiming a 131-117 win to tie up the series at one game a piece.

The star of the night was easily Curry who, after starting out slowly (again), found his stroke from all over the floor to terrorize the Denver defense. Curry hit all variety of shots — step back jumpers from behind the arc, pull ups from mid-range, and even nifty finishes at the rim. He finished with a game high 30 points on 13-23 shooting, including 9 of his 13 shots from inside the arc.

But just as important as Curry’s scoring was his ability to set up his teammates. He also tallied 13 assists, getting the rest of his guys going to help trigger the onslaught that Denver simply didn’t have an answer for.

Three other Warriors besides Curry had at least 20 points in this game, led by Jarrett Jack’s 26 points (10-15 shooting) and rookie Harrison Barnes’ 24 points (9-14 shooting). Add that to Klay Thompson’s 21 points on 11 shots (including 5-6 from behind the arc) and the Warriors’ perimeter players overwhelmed the Nuggets all night.

Barnes’ performance was especially impressive in this game, not just because he’s rookie, but more so because of the versatility he showed in scoring the ball. He not only hit from the outside, but was also able to knock down mid-range shots while showing a fantastic ability to finish at the rim. He had several highlight level plays, including a two handed reverse dunk on Anthony Randolph that left the Denver crowd stunned and his teammates celebrating.

Those finishes at the rim were indicative of a second half that had Denver head coach George Karl scrambling for defensive answers that never came. With the Warriors doing so much damage from the wing, Karl elected to play a small lineup for most of the final 24 minutes, only playing Kosta Koufos a shade over three minutes and JaVale McGee a little over four minutes. Instead Karl turned to Anthony Randolph and Kenneth Faried as his big men, but both struggled to protect the rim. Faried, returning from injury, looked particularly sluggish and not yet back in game form, lacking his normal burst and athleticism around the basket on either end of the floor.

The Warriors took full advantage of that lack of size, running pick and rolls that allowed them to attack the paint and then finishing with ease once there. Golden State hit 12 of their 14 shots in the restricted area in that second half, which only led to the Nuggets over-helping once the ball got close to the rim, allowing the Warriors to kick the ball out to wide open shooters behind the arc. The formula was simplistic, but highly effective and all the Nuggets could do was watch as their home court advantage got washed away in the tide of made Warriors buckets.

Meanwhile, even though the Nuggets scored 117 points, they have to question if their approach is going to get it done over the course of this series. Denver only scored 8 fast break points in this game and couldn’t find many ways to generate the frenetic pace they love to play at. The Warriors cut off the Nuggets’ fast break attack wonderfully by consistently sending three players back on defense, trading offensive rebounding chances for better transition defense.

Meanwhile, the Nuggets were just the opposite, sending three (and sometimes four) players to the offensive glass on too many possessions and allowing the Warriors to run out for fast break chances in the process. The Warriors didn’t take advantage of these chances often, but they did get some timely baskets on run-outs; baskets that enabled them to maintain and/or extend the lead at crucial parts of the game.

Through two games in this series it’s not a stretch to say that the Warriors have clearly been the better team. They only lost game one by a single last second basket, but blew the doors off the Nuggets in game two. The Warriors look more poised and seem to have a better game plan through two games. And now head back to what will surely be a raucous Oracle Arena in Oakland to try and carry over momentum and seize control of the series.

On a night that started with so many questions for the Warriors, it’s now the Nuggets that have some searching to do. And if they can’t find some answers quickly, they may find themselves on the wrong end of first round upset.