Tag: Andrew Wiggins

Minnesota Timberwolves v Sacramento Kings

Report: Timberwolves still want to trade Rick Rubio


Ricky Rubio says he doesn’t believe the Timberwolves will trade him.

On the other hand…

Ric Bucher of Bleacher Report:

I’m hearing that the Minnesota Timberwolves are actually look at potentially moving off of Rubio at this point. They’ve seen enough, and they do not believe that he is the future, in spite of the fact that he’s only 24. Now, they’ve tested the trade waters. I’m hearing that they’re quiet right now, but that they could return to looking to see what they could get for Rubio once the season begins and some things shake out for some other teams, because they don’t have any specific trade partners at the moment.

The Associated Press’ Jon Krawczynski, who’s pretty plugged in to the Timberwolves, saw our previous report on Rubio being confident Minnesota will keep him and tweeted:

So, I wouldn’t take Bucher’s report as gospel.

But if the Timberwolves are convinced Rubio isn’t the answer at point guard – which seems like a premature conclusion given Rubio’s ability and age – it would be better to deal him sooner than later.

Andrew Wiggins and Karl-Anthony Towns give Minnesota a bright future. Losing Rubio – unless they get a suitable point guard in return – would probably hurt the Timberwolves in the short term. But perhaps they should focus more on maximizing the team when Wiggins and Towns hit their primes.

Again, Rubio is young enough to fit that arc. But if Flip Saunders believes Rubio just won’t hit the next level, Minnesota should trade him before other teams figure that out for themselves.

Rubio’s youth is an ever-diminishing asset. The four years and $55 million left on his contract look reasonable now, but that might now remain the case if Rubio falters this season.

The 39-year-old Andre Miller obviously isn’t Minnesota long-term answer, and it’s far to soon to anoint rookie Tyus Jones. So, this would be more about Rubio than anything else – which should be a red flag to potential trade partners. If the team that knows him best doesn’t believe in Rubio, why should others?

So, that leads to a question to be asked with every anonymously sourced report: Who has incentive to leak this information? It’s not the Timberwolves here. It might be Rubio if he’s unhappy, but that doesn’t appear to be the case. My best guess is it’s another team looking to stir the pot and possibly extract Rubio from Minnesota, which wouldn’t be the most credible source.

Ricky Rubio is confident Timberwolves not looking to trade him

Minnesota Timberwolves v Sacramento Kings

Ricky Rubio’s name has come up in increased trade speculation the last few weeks. And we mean speculation. An international basketball site took reports that Phil Jackson says the Knicks need more talent in the backcourt and combined with a Boston Globe report the Timberwolves are a little frustrated with the pace of improvement in Rubio’s game to create a trade rumor where nothing of substance exists. Other speculation surrounds the Nets. It’s August, so some people are talking about it.

Rubio says he doesn’t buy it.

He is in Dubai right now and said this to Gulf News (hat tip Fox Sports).

“I have confidence that the team wants me but you know in this league anybody can get traded,” said the flashy playmaker. “You don’t listen to the rumours. You just live day-by-day and that’s it.”

When asked if he wanted to stay with the long-suffering Timberwolves, Rubio gave a firm: “Yes.”

It would be a mistake for Minnesota to trade Rubio right now as their starting point guard unless they have a viable backup plan. And Zach LaVine is not a viable backup plan. (His athleticism is not in question, but his understanding of the game, his rate of turnovers, and his poor defense do not project as someone you want to be your starting point guard.) If Minnesota wants to move on from Rubio, the question becomes who do they move on to? Andre Miller is on the roster but he’s not the long-term answer, and Tyus Jones is a long ways off if he gets there at all.

Rubio has the potential to elevate the games of Andrew Wiggins and Karl-Anthony Towns with his creativity on the floor. Minnesota has so much potential with this roster; they need to play it out for part of the season and evaluate how the pieces fit, then start to think about moves. Moving Rubio now — especially for what the Knicks or Nets can offer in return — is a bad idea.

But it’s August, so discuss it if you want.

Watch Luis Scola drop 35 and 13 to lead Argentina past Canada at FIBA America


Raptors fans had to feel conflicted.

On one hand, they got to see their new power forward show that he still has a lot in the tank. There are questions about how the Raptors rebuilt their roster this summer, but if he plays like this Luis Scola can answer a few of them.

On the other hand, those Raptors fans are Canadians excited about their strong young national team — and Scola just torched them.

Score one for the old guard as Scola and Argentina beat Canada 97-84 behind 35 points and 13 rebounds from Scola Tuesday. He did it with his deliberate, physical, crafty, below-the-rim game.

Canada’s athletic young team — led by Andrew Wiggins, who had 13 in the game — looked a little tentative in their first game as potential favorites on a big stage. The top two finishers at FIBA Americas get a berth in the 2016 Rio Olympics, and there is an expectation Canada will land one of those slots.

Argentina came out with an intensity and desire Canada did not match. Argentina has been on the big stages before — they are the 2004 Olympic gold medalists — and it showed.

Canada can right the ship Wednesday against Cuba (a game Canada should win handily). From there they should be able to get the wins to get to the knockout stage, and then they just need to play more like Scola and Argentina to advance.

Andrew Wiggins dunks on Andres Nocioni, bumps him again while hanging on rim (video)

Kelly Olynyk

Andrew Wiggins, representing Canada in the FIBA Americas Championship, drove past his defender and dunked on former NBA player Andres Nocioni. It was a fantastic play.

Hanging on the rim and bumping a dejected Nocioni? That was just insulting – and I mean that as an absolute positive.

Unfortunately for Wiggins and the Canadians, Luis Scola (35 points and 13 rebounds) led Argentina to a 94-87 victory.

Anthony Bennett has looked good playing for Canada. Will that carry over to NBA?

Men's basketball, Semi final round action,

Canada opens its FIBA Americas play today (Tuesday) taking on Argentina, in what should be one of the more attractive Group B matches in the tournament. It’s a game of contrasts. Argentina is the old guard, they have had international success — gold at the 2004 Olympics — but their golden generation has aged out (Manu Ginobili isn’t playing for them, for example). Canada is the young team on the rise, a squad loaded with young NBA talent — Andrew Wiggins, Andrew Nicholson, Cory Joseph, Nik Stauskas, Kelly Olynyk, Dwight Powell, and…

Anthony Bennett.

The former No. 1 pick, a guy panned as a bust, has looked good for Canada in warmups for the tournament. He was a starter and key part of Canada winning the FIBA Americas’ tuneup event, the Tuto Marchand Continental Cup. Against Brazil, he scored 11 straight points and finished with 16 points in 15 minutes in that tournament.

He was asked about what is different after that win, as reported by Josh Lewenberg at TSN.

“[I’m] just playing with confidence, pretty much,” the 22-year-old forward responded. “Just going out there, playing defense, running the court. Just doing the little things first and trying to make offense come to me.”

“Anthony has been exemplary this summer,” said (Canada GM Steve) Nash, the two-time NBA MVP and future hall of fame point guard. “He’s had a tough first two years in the league but his attitude’s been amazing. His talent has never been in question but his attitude, willingness to learn and attention to detail… not that his attitude was ever an issue, but for him to come, to play in the Pan Am Games, to partake in a whole summer with us, it shows he has a real willingness to learn and get better and a want to be a great player.”

Bennett is also healthy, which has not happened a lot through his first two years in the NBA, and those injuries impacted his conditioning.

The question is, can Bennett bring this same level of play to Minnesota next season?

Bennett has had moments where he’s looked improved before — 2014 Summer League, for example — but it hasn’t translated once the NBA tipped off. Bennett was better last season in Minnesota than he was as a rookie, but he still needs to make strides to become a regular rotation player an improving Timberwolves team can count on.

That’s the ceiling for Bennett, it seem — solid rotation player. That’s nowhere near what is expected out of a No. 1 pick, but that anchor around him is more about Cleveland’s misread than it is Bennett’s game (notice the Cavs changed GMs). Bennett is what he is.

Canadian coach Jay Triano told Bennett to simplify the game — find a thing or two you’re good at and focus on doing those things exceptionally well. Crash the boards, run the floor. Everything else will fall into place.

If it falls into place for the Timberwolves, it will be one more piece in their puzzle.