Tag: Andrew Bynum

Indiana Pacers v Atlanta Hawks - Game Three

Paul George tries to quell talk of feuds within Pacers locker room


It doesn’t exactly take a PhD. in analytic chemistry to see the that Pacers are having chemistry issues on the court.

As fans we like simple, clean answers to things — it’s Lance Stephenson’s fault, it was trading Danny Granger, it’s all on Frank Vogel, it’s Andrew Bynum, etc. — when the reality is it is a little bit of a lot of things. Life is a complex dish. Those little things have formed a perfect storm of an issue.

One Paul George is tired of talking about. He wants you to know that he and his fellow Pacers are still tight. So first he took to Instagram Tuesday night.

Caption: These rumors have got to stop! Its gettin old now and all you that believe them are ignorant! #Brothers

I get what Paul George is going for here, but “gone fishing” has a different connotation in the playoffs. Not sure that is what he was going for here.

George echoed some of those same things at shootaround before Game 2 against the Wizards on Wednesday night, as reported by Brian Windhorst at ESPN.

“I’m just getting tired of the media and these stories,” he said. “I’m just putting everything to bed and to rest.”

George Hill chimed in, too.

“You guys keep making up stories,” Hill said. “We’re just trying to focus and letting Roy know through all this BS that is going on, the rumors and everything like that, that we’re all brothers. This locker room is a tight group and we’re going to continue to be there for each other even when people are trying to break it apart.”

The Pacers are going with the “us against the world” motivation — which is fine if it works. At this point they should do anything that works.

I don’t think the question should be “do they like each other?” I imagine many of them do still get along and will hang out fishing this summer.

The real question is “can they get back to playing together as a unit?”

Watching the way they do not trust each other on the court, the way they don’t move off the ball, the way they are afraid to give up the rock for fear of never getting it back, I’m not sure they can, I’m not sure anything will work. At least not well enough, fast enough to salvage this season.

Or very possibly even this series against the Wizards.

Andrew Bynum has left the Indiana Pacers. It was mutual.

Boston Celtics v Indiana Pacers

Well, that couldn’t have gone much worse.

Let’s take a look back at the Andrew Bynum era in Indiana: 36 minutes over the course of two games, scoring 23 points and pulling down 19 rebounds during what amounted to two little tests in the regular season. Oh, and he used a lot of training room ice. Spent some time in the anti-gravity treadmill. That’s basically all of it.

Andrew Bynum’s time in Indiana is done, the team announced Wednesday — he will miss the remainder of the playoffs and not be with the team.

“We want to thank Andrew and our medical staff for trying to get the issues with his knee resolved,” Pacers President Larry Bird said in a released statement. “We wish him the best in the future.”

The Pacers signed him as a free agent Feb. 1 for $1 million. Despite Bird’s public protestations, this was really a signing designed to keep Bynum away from the Heat or another team that might use him against the Pacers in the playoffs (at the time of the signing that was a concern). If the Pacers got anything out of Bynum, great, but when he was signed the guys in the locker room shrugged.

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To be fair Bynum is not at fault for the collapse we have seen in Indiana — he was barely around the team, he didn’t change the chemistry, he was not taken seriously enough to damage chemistry. It’s not Bynum’s fault that somehow Roy Hibbert has morphed into a poor man’s Kendrick Perkins on the court. (The Danny Granger for Evan Turner move by Bird had a bigger impact in the locker room and on the court.)

Bynum’s NBA future going forward is largely nonexistent. He has serious knee issues and doesn’t like to play through pain in them. His chances in Cleveland and Indiana largely went poorly — he can do some things still on the court but he can’t really get and stay on the court.

I like Bynum, he’s smart and honest. He’s got a diversity of interests in his life, he is curious and likes to explore. That makes for an interesting person. However, it doesn’t really make for a great NBA player — that requires a singular focus that is just not in Bynum’s nature.

Because he’s big and skilled some team may give him a small, non-guaranteed contract. Maybe a training camp invite. But the days of investing in Bynum are gone, and soon he will be free to bowl when he wants, to flamenco dance his way across Europe without being bothered by nagging NBA responsibilities and fans.

NBA Playoff Preview: Indiana Pacers vs. Washington Wizards

Roy Hibbert


Indiana Pacers: 56-26

Washington Wizards: 44-38


Indiana Pacers: Andrew Bynum (out indefinitely, knee)

Washington Wizards: none

OFFENSE/DEFENSE RANKINGS (points per 100 possession)

Indiana Pacers: Offense 101.5 (22nd in the NBA), Defense 96.7 (1st in the NBA)

Washington Wizards: Offense 103.3 (18th in NBA), Defense 102.4 (10th in NBA)


1) How much can/will the Wizards stretch the Pacers?

The Hawks took Indiana to seven games by stretching the floor, pulling Roy Hibbert out of the paint and gunning 3-pointers.

That was Atlanta’s identity. It’s not exactly the Wizards’.

Washington’s four most-used bigs – Marcin Gortat, Nene, Trevor Booker and Kevin Seraphin – lack range to shoot from the perimeter. And typically, the Wizards used two of them at a time.

In a first-round win over the Bulls, Gortat, Nene and Booker (Seraphin didn’t make the rotation) were Washington’s power forward-center combination 84 percent of the time. In the regular-season, the Wizards weren’t quite as dependent on a non-shooting PF-C combo, but they still used one 65 percent of the time.


Fortunately for the Wizards, they have a couple bigs with shooting range on the roster: Al Harrington and Drew Gooden. Those two played together frequently, building a bit of chemistry and making them more effective in tandem Trevor Ariza can also play small-ball power forward.

So, the Wizards can definitely stretch the floor at times. The main question is how much they’re willing to alter their rotation to do it more.

Would Randy Wittman do something radical – staring Harrington and Gooden – and force the Pacers to make the adjustments they’re reluctant to make? Harrington and Gooden playing together at any point would wrinkle Indiana’s preferred scheme, but if they play together with Hibbert and a tradition power forward (David West or Luis Scola) in the game, it would go much further.

Wittman should deploy Harrington and Gooden primarily against Hibbert, but matching rotations could be difficult. Doing so to begin halves would be the simplest – and most daring – way to do it.

The Wizards might not have to go to such extreme measures, but the goal – stretching the floor – should play a big factor in this series.

2) Will the Pacers protect the ball?

The Pacers are not a good passing team, and the Wizards excelled at forcing turnovers during the regular season.

Against Chicago’s limited offense, the Wizards didn’t take quite as many chances going for turnovers. They just played sound defense and let the Bulls miss shots.

How will Washington approach the Pacers’ never-good, lately imploding offense? The question might be decided on the other end of the floor.

If the Wizards can score against Indiana’s once-stout defense, they can afford to lower variance defensively. If they can’t, they might need to go for turnovers and the fastbreak points steals generate – even if that strategy allows the Pacers more layups and dunks due to out-of-position defenders.

3) Have Roy Hibbert and the rest of the Pacers lost their mental edge?

Indiana finished the season with a 10-13 stretch and then struggled more than most expected in a first-round win over the Hawks. No Pacer has fallen harder than Hibbert, who went from All-Star to nearly benched.

But Vogel stuck with the center, and Hibbert rewarded that faith with 13 points, seven rebounds and five blocks in a Game 7 win over Atlanta. Unquestionably, the Hawks were a bad matchup for Hibbert, but that doesn’t explain his second-half slide. It’s tough to say exactly where Hibbert stands entering this series.

Maybe rallying to win from down 2-1 and 3-2 to Atlanta has righted the Pacers’ ship. More likely, they remain fragile.

Where is Hibbert’s confidence? Where is Indiana’s? Where the answers fall on the spectrum could determine the series.


For most of the season, the Pacers were the better team. But it matters only which is better now.

Wizards in 7