Tag: Andrew Bynum

Indiana Pacers v Atlanta Hawks - Game Three

Paul George tries to quell talk of feuds within Pacers locker room


It doesn’t exactly take a PhD. in analytic chemistry to see the that Pacers are having chemistry issues on the court.

As fans we like simple, clean answers to things — it’s Lance Stephenson’s fault, it was trading Danny Granger, it’s all on Frank Vogel, it’s Andrew Bynum, etc. — when the reality is it is a little bit of a lot of things. Life is a complex dish. Those little things have formed a perfect storm of an issue.

One Paul George is tired of talking about. He wants you to know that he and his fellow Pacers are still tight. So first he took to Instagram Tuesday night.

Caption: These rumors have got to stop! Its gettin old now and all you that believe them are ignorant! #Brothers

I get what Paul George is going for here, but “gone fishing” has a different connotation in the playoffs. Not sure that is what he was going for here.

George echoed some of those same things at shootaround before Game 2 against the Wizards on Wednesday night, as reported by Brian Windhorst at ESPN.

“I’m just getting tired of the media and these stories,” he said. “I’m just putting everything to bed and to rest.”

George Hill chimed in, too.

“You guys keep making up stories,” Hill said. “We’re just trying to focus and letting Roy know through all this BS that is going on, the rumors and everything like that, that we’re all brothers. This locker room is a tight group and we’re going to continue to be there for each other even when people are trying to break it apart.”

The Pacers are going with the “us against the world” motivation — which is fine if it works. At this point they should do anything that works.

I don’t think the question should be “do they like each other?” I imagine many of them do still get along and will hang out fishing this summer.

The real question is “can they get back to playing together as a unit?”

Watching the way they do not trust each other on the court, the way they don’t move off the ball, the way they are afraid to give up the rock for fear of never getting it back, I’m not sure they can, I’m not sure anything will work. At least not well enough, fast enough to salvage this season.

Or very possibly even this series against the Wizards.

Andrew Bynum has left the Indiana Pacers. It was mutual.

Boston Celtics v Indiana Pacers

Well, that couldn’t have gone much worse.

Let’s take a look back at the Andrew Bynum era in Indiana: 36 minutes over the course of two games, scoring 23 points and pulling down 19 rebounds during what amounted to two little tests in the regular season. Oh, and he used a lot of training room ice. Spent some time in the anti-gravity treadmill. That’s basically all of it.

Andrew Bynum’s time in Indiana is done, the team announced Wednesday — he will miss the remainder of the playoffs and not be with the team.

“We want to thank Andrew and our medical staff for trying to get the issues with his knee resolved,” Pacers President Larry Bird said in a released statement. “We wish him the best in the future.”

The Pacers signed him as a free agent Feb. 1 for $1 million. Despite Bird’s public protestations, this was really a signing designed to keep Bynum away from the Heat or another team that might use him against the Pacers in the playoffs (at the time of the signing that was a concern). If the Pacers got anything out of Bynum, great, but when he was signed the guys in the locker room shrugged.

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To be fair Bynum is not at fault for the collapse we have seen in Indiana — he was barely around the team, he didn’t change the chemistry, he was not taken seriously enough to damage chemistry. It’s not Bynum’s fault that somehow Roy Hibbert has morphed into a poor man’s Kendrick Perkins on the court. (The Danny Granger for Evan Turner move by Bird had a bigger impact in the locker room and on the court.)

Bynum’s NBA future going forward is largely nonexistent. He has serious knee issues and doesn’t like to play through pain in them. His chances in Cleveland and Indiana largely went poorly — he can do some things still on the court but he can’t really get and stay on the court.

I like Bynum, he’s smart and honest. He’s got a diversity of interests in his life, he is curious and likes to explore. That makes for an interesting person. However, it doesn’t really make for a great NBA player — that requires a singular focus that is just not in Bynum’s nature.

Because he’s big and skilled some team may give him a small, non-guaranteed contract. Maybe a training camp invite. But the days of investing in Bynum are gone, and soon he will be free to bowl when he wants, to flamenco dance his way across Europe without being bothered by nagging NBA responsibilities and fans.

NBA Playoff Preview: Indiana Pacers vs. Washington Wizards

Roy Hibbert


Indiana Pacers: 56-26

Washington Wizards: 44-38


Indiana Pacers: Andrew Bynum (out indefinitely, knee)

Washington Wizards: none

OFFENSE/DEFENSE RANKINGS (points per 100 possession)

Indiana Pacers: Offense 101.5 (22nd in the NBA), Defense 96.7 (1st in the NBA)

Washington Wizards: Offense 103.3 (18th in NBA), Defense 102.4 (10th in NBA)


1) How much can/will the Wizards stretch the Pacers?

The Hawks took Indiana to seven games by stretching the floor, pulling Roy Hibbert out of the paint and gunning 3-pointers.

That was Atlanta’s identity. It’s not exactly the Wizards’.

Washington’s four most-used bigs – Marcin Gortat, Nene, Trevor Booker and Kevin Seraphin – lack range to shoot from the perimeter. And typically, the Wizards used two of them at a time.

In a first-round win over the Bulls, Gortat, Nene and Booker (Seraphin didn’t make the rotation) were Washington’s power forward-center combination 84 percent of the time. In the regular-season, the Wizards weren’t quite as dependent on a non-shooting PF-C combo, but they still used one 65 percent of the time.


Fortunately for the Wizards, they have a couple bigs with shooting range on the roster: Al Harrington and Drew Gooden. Those two played together frequently, building a bit of chemistry and making them more effective in tandem Trevor Ariza can also play small-ball power forward.

So, the Wizards can definitely stretch the floor at times. The main question is how much they’re willing to alter their rotation to do it more.

Would Randy Wittman do something radical – staring Harrington and Gooden – and force the Pacers to make the adjustments they’re reluctant to make? Harrington and Gooden playing together at any point would wrinkle Indiana’s preferred scheme, but if they play together with Hibbert and a tradition power forward (David West or Luis Scola) in the game, it would go much further.

Wittman should deploy Harrington and Gooden primarily against Hibbert, but matching rotations could be difficult. Doing so to begin halves would be the simplest – and most daring – way to do it.

The Wizards might not have to go to such extreme measures, but the goal – stretching the floor – should play a big factor in this series.

2) Will the Pacers protect the ball?

The Pacers are not a good passing team, and the Wizards excelled at forcing turnovers during the regular season.

Against Chicago’s limited offense, the Wizards didn’t take quite as many chances going for turnovers. They just played sound defense and let the Bulls miss shots.

How will Washington approach the Pacers’ never-good, lately imploding offense? The question might be decided on the other end of the floor.

If the Wizards can score against Indiana’s once-stout defense, they can afford to lower variance defensively. If they can’t, they might need to go for turnovers and the fastbreak points steals generate – even if that strategy allows the Pacers more layups and dunks due to out-of-position defenders.

3) Have Roy Hibbert and the rest of the Pacers lost their mental edge?

Indiana finished the season with a 10-13 stretch and then struggled more than most expected in a first-round win over the Hawks. No Pacer has fallen harder than Hibbert, who went from All-Star to nearly benched.

But Vogel stuck with the center, and Hibbert rewarded that faith with 13 points, seven rebounds and five blocks in a Game 7 win over Atlanta. Unquestionably, the Hawks were a bad matchup for Hibbert, but that doesn’t explain his second-half slide. It’s tough to say exactly where Hibbert stands entering this series.

Maybe rallying to win from down 2-1 and 3-2 to Atlanta has righted the Pacers’ ship. More likely, they remain fragile.

Where is Hibbert’s confidence? Where is Indiana’s? Where the answers fall on the spectrum could determine the series.


For most of the season, the Pacers were the better team. But it matters only which is better now.

Wizards in 7

Greg Oden waits for lucky break that may not come

Miami Heat v Indiana Pacers

CHARLOTTE — The man sitting at the end of the bench knows he is not going to play. The warm-up jacket and pants will not come off. So he just sits, plaintive look on his face, and he watches with an expression that almost never changed. His long legs stretch out almost into the court. Every now and again, someone in the stands will point at him.

“That guy,” a friend will say to a friend or a parent will say to a child, “was once the first pick in the NBA Draft. He was going to be the next big star.”

Yes, Greg Oden was the first pick in the NBA Draft. Yes, he was going to be the game’s next big star.  Yes, he had everything — size, strength, balance, a defensive presence, a sense of the game. Yes, yes, yes, he was all those things, his future was unlimited … but that was many injuries ago. MANY injuries ago.  Nostalgia and regret often mingle.

Now he sits here on the end of the bench. Sure, Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra has told him to be ready to get in there, that all players must be ready if the Heat is going to repeat as champions again. Oden doesn’t say much but he says he will stay ready.

He also knows that LeBron James continuously makes the point that the team’s depth — and specifically having Greg Oden on that bench — will play a huge role in these playoffs at some point. Oden says he will be prepared for the moment.

Greg Oden also knows that he is not going to play.

Sometimes there is nothing left to say except life is unfair.

* * *

Let’s start with the end because it is easier to pinpoint. We know the exact date. The end for the Greg Oden experiment came on March 26, 2014. That was the day that every hope and illusion about this latest comeback shattered.

Everybody wanted that comeback. For him. He deserved it. Oden had missed almost four years of basketball when Miami signed him for the minimum before the season began. He deserved good things.

And this looked like a good setup. Nobody expected Greg Oden to suddenly be the superstar everyone expected six or seven years ago. But, in the least, he looked like potential Kryptonite for Indiana’s big man Roy Hibbert. You will remember that last year the Heat had a ferocious seven-game series with Indiana and they could do nothing at all with Hibbert, who averaged 22 points and 10 boards for the series. It didn’t matter what Spoelstra tried, the Heat did not have a Hibbert answer.

Well Greg Oden is a 7-footer, 250-plus pounds, he could pound on Hibbert and weigh on him and foul him and frustrate him. Sure, if Oden recaptured some of his lost talent, everyone would cheer. But, at the least, he could slow Hibbert.

That dream ended on March 26. The Heat had slowly worked Oden into the lineup. From the start of the new year, they put him in a few games for five- and six-minute stretches just to get him some time on the court. Ten days before the big game against Indiana, they put him in the starting lineup. He flashed a few positive signs. He scored six, grabbed three rebounds, blocked a couple of shots at Cleveland. He made both his shots and blocked two more against Memphis.

And on March 26, he started against Indiana — a homecoming for Oden, who went to High School in Indianapolis. Everyone was watching this time. And … lets just say it did not go well. If it had been a fight, they would have stopped it. Well, in truth, they did stop it. Hibbert did everything he wanted for six minutes, Oden was utterly helpless, and after six minutes Spoelstra could not watch anymore. He pulled Oden and did not put him back in … for three weeks.

In fact, Oden has played in just one game since the end — 13 uninspired minutes in an entirely meaningless game against a putrid Philadelphia team. He has not played again. The official explanation for Oden’s disappearance was that he has had “back spasms.” He undoubtedly has had back spasms. But …

“Terrible,” Oden told reporters after the Hibbert game. He knew. He was heartbroken. This haunted pro basketball career of his just won’t ever let Greg Oden breathe.

* * *

In the beginning, Greg Oden was the franchise. He was the next in line of dominant NBA centers after Dwight Howard, Tim Duncan and Shaq. He was big, he was strong, he was balanced, he worked hard, he blocked shots, he was the man. When you asked around the NBA about the first pick in the 2007 draft — the choice being manchild Greg Oden or scoring machine Kevin Durant — about seven out of 10 said Oden.

Why Oden? Well, some thought he was a SAFER pick. Durant was viewed as a one-dimensional scorer. Oden had a bigger game.

Some thought he was the WISER pick because he had already filled out. People forget: Durant made news shortly before the draft because he couldn’t bench-press all seven Harry Potter books (actually it was 185 pounds he couldn’t press) and scouts could just imagine him getting backed all the way down to the beer concession stand. Oden meanwhile looked like he was 10 years older than his age, even as a freshman he looked like a man going back and playing with the college kids, and there was no need to imagine who he would become.

And some though he was a BETTER pick than Durant because great centers tend to lead teams to championships while great scoring forwards often do not.

Of course, there were counterarguments; there were some people who passionately believed Durant was the right choice. But in the end, Portland did what most teams would have done with the first pick and took Oden. There was some irony here; Portland brought a special history to the draft having already taken an injury-prone center (Sam Bowie) over a college super-scorer (Michael Jordan) and had never quite lived that down. But, hey, that could not happen again, right?

Before Oden played his first NBA game, he had microfracture surgery on his right knee. Before his first game. He missed the entire 2007-08 season. While Durant poured in points his rookie year, the Bowie-Jordan comparison was being made ad nauseam.

It should be noted: The story was certainly not in stone yet. It was just one injury, and one thing that Portland loved about Oden was his dedication and work ethic. Before he entered his surgery, he reportedly told Portland GM Kevin Pritchard again and again how sorry he was for letting the team down and how desperate he was to come back. “We picked the right kid,” Pritchard told reporters after that surgery. “He cares about this organization.”

Oden came back in 2008. In his first game – HIS FIRST GAME – Andrew Bynum landed on his foot and he missed two weeks. But then Oden started to show the promise. In his fifth NBA game, he scored 22, grabbed 10 boards, blocked two shots. He became a starter in Game 9, and while he was inconsistent — rookies will be inconsistent — he had bright moments. He grabbed 13 boards against Detroit. He had a double-double at Washington. Fifteen rebounds against the Clippers. Sixteen points 10 boards against Toronto.

On January 12, he went to Chicago and dominated — 17 points, 13 rebounds. Milwaukee couldn’t stop him — 24 points, 15 rebounds. He blocked six shots against the Knicks. Yes, finally, it was coming together.

And then, just as he started to feel good, he bumped knees with Corey Maggette. This time he cracked the patella in his left knee. He was out for more than a month. But the bigger problem was that he now had some trouble with BOTH knees. And that, any big man will tell you, is a bad, bad sign.

In December of the next season, Oden fractured his left patella. Everyone said it had nothing to do with the earlier injury but, at this point, it didn’t matter. The guy just could not stay healthy. He was out for another season. Oden announced that this time he wasn’t coming back until he was ready, until he was fully healthy and ready to deliver on his promise.

One year later, instead, he announced that he was having microfracture surgery on his left knee. That put him out for another year.

The next year, he ha a couple more knee surgeries, putting him out for another year.

Then he said he needed a year to recover and be fully healthy.

When the Miami Heat signed him before this season, he had played in just 82 games in five years. He worked insanely hard to come back, time after time, he didn’t deserve all those setbacks. But, as the line in Unforgiven goes, “Deserve’s got nothing to do with it.” And you know the end already.

* * *

Two or three weeks ago, people were openly questioning the Heat — they were playing pretty lousy. But in the NBA, nothing really matters until the playoffs and the Heat was the only team to sweep its opening round series. The champs suddenly look healthy and rested and they are enjoying watching the best teams in the East flounder and their own path open up.

Miami not only looks healthy now, it looks overstocked. The end of the Heat bench is loaded with guys you know even if you are only a mild NBA fan. There’s Shane Battier, the 35-year-old defensive specialist who has played a huge role in the Heat’s previous two championships. There’s Udonis Haslem, another major player in the championship runs, who every now and again goes into games and cannot be stopped. There’s Rashard Lewis, once one of the top scorers in the NBA.

The truth is, the Heat can’t use them all. The NBA is a game of match-ups, a game of rhythm, and Erik Spoelstra is not bluffing when he says he needs everyone to be ready. There could come a moment for any of them.

But … probably not for Greg Oden. For one thing, the man he was probably brought in to stop — Roy Hibbert — is in the middle of a nightmare playoffs and his Pacers could get eliminated as early as Thursday. For another, Oden’s body just won’t let him be the player he might have been. He’s just 26, but his knees are 50, and while Kevin Durant will probably win the MVP Award this year, Greg Oden will probably not leave the Miami bench.

Oden says he will keep waiting though. He says he has not lost hope. That might be the most miraculous part of all.

Report: Frank Vogel “coaching for his job” in wake of team’s slide

Atlanta Hawks v Indiana Pacers - Game Two

I’m not of the belief that Frank Vogel forgot how to coach over the All-Star break. Sure, the drinks are strong in New Orleans, but not THAT strong. Vogel had spent years building a team first system in Indiana that worked well when guys bought in, but when Roy Hibbert started to slump to Kendrick Perkins offensive levels, and when other guys started breaking out of the system, it all came apart. That includes a Game 1 loss to the Hawks in the first round of the playoffs (the Pacers bounced back for a Game 2 win).

Vogel could not easily right the ship — he tends to be inflexible and the Pacers stick to their script no matter what — but how much of this is really on him?

Apparently some in Indiana think a lot.

Vogel is coaching to save his job, reports Marc Stein at ESPN.

Sources close to the situation told ESPN.com that Vogel, despite a 56-win season that secured the No. 1 seed in the Eastern Conference, is “coaching for his job” in the wake of Indiana’s alarming slide that has stretched into its third month.

Following Indiana’s 101-85 triumph over Atlanta in Game 2 of the teams’ first-round series, sources told ESPN.com that coming back to win the series against the Hawks would not automatically ensure Vogel’s safety….

The decision on whether to retain Vogel at season’s end ultimately rests with Pacers president Larry Bird, sources said, but frustration throughout the organization has been mounting thanks to a nosedive that began in February with a loss in Orlando just before the All-Star break and has show few signs of abating.

If the Pacers make the mistake of firing Vogel other teams will be lined up to grab him. Vogel has shown he can build a culture and system that, with the right players, can win a lot of games and go deep in the playoffs (they made the Eastern Conference Finals last season). You think a building program like Utah could use that kind of guy? And that’s just one example.

Vogel built a system designed around Roy Hibbert’s size and defense that is designed to shut off penetration, that is big and physical. He doesn’t like to vary from that. Which has worked quite well for the Pacers, until the second half of this season. However, in Game 2 we saw adjustments from the Pacers — Paul George on Jeff Teague, switching pick-and-rolls to stop Pero Antic and Paul Millsap from having uncontested threes — but ones that stayed within their identity.

Bird might want to look in the mirror — his moves at the deadline to help this team simply did not. Evan Turner has been a bust, unable to really play in the Indy system (and losing Danny Granger was an emotional blow to the locker room). Andrew Bynum didn’t really hurt this team but if you had any expectations he would help them you hadn’t watched a lot of Bynum in the last couple years.

Vogel is not blameless in the slide, something else Stein, with the help of Chris Broussard, writes about:

ESPN The Magazine’s Chris Broussard reports that sources with knowledge of the Pacers’ locker room dynamic have been insisting for months that Indiana would miss the presence of assistant coach Brian Shaw, who left the club last summer to become the Denver Nuggets’ head man.

Broussard reports that, with Vogel known for being “completely positive” in his approach to dealing with players, Shaw often played the role of “bad cop” and helped keep the Pacers’ potentially volatile locker room from imploding. Shaw’s absence didn’t appear to be an issue early this season, but some insiders believe his absence has been felt during the Pacers’ splintering over the past few months.

That said the issues in Indy are more about the players on the roster and the lack of shot creators far more than it is coaching or styles.

Indy seemed to find some footing in their Game 2 win over the Hawks, but it’s just the first step on a long road to recovery. A road that has a good Washington team (they are good when Nene plays) standing in the way.

But this season is not close to something Vogel should be fired over.