Tag: Andrew Bynum

Andrew Bynum

Andrew Bynum makes backhanded dig at Lakers fans


Andrew Bynum was introduced as the newest Cavalier and said all the right things — if he is right and Kyrie Irving is right that is a dangerous team. I think we all expect Irving to be right and an All-Star; with Bynum everybody is wait-and-see.

At his introduction Bynum stuck to the company line about how excited he was to be there and the rest (not that he didn’t mean it, but it’s cliché).

Then he was asked about the fans in Cleveland, and he got in a little dig at Lakers (and I guess Sixers) fans (2:30 of the video below, found by SLAM and Beyond the Buzzer).

‘I just know that they’re really, really passionate and I haven’t had the opportunity to play for a city that is really just gonna stand up and really support the team, I’m super excited and I can’t wait to see what it’s like.’”

Really? Lakers fans were pretty supportive of Bynum despite his at times disinterested and petulant attitude toward basketball and the organization. Lakers fans expect a level of professionalism that seemed hit and miss with him.

(What people outside Los Angeles don’t realize is the deep well Lakers fans in the city — the people who show up late and spend the game on their iPhones in the lower bowl are just the trendy fans in the television shot. Los Angeles is filled with mechanics and Thai food cooks and insurance salesmen who are passionate Lakers fans but can only afford to go to a game or two a year. Those people watch every game on television and care about the team, not just being seen at games.)

When Bynum is focused and into it, he is a force. He is also one of the least scripted, more thoughtful guys you can find in a locker room. But that package has come with immaturity, which at time reads as a disinterest in basketball. He doesn’t come off as a guy committed to his career or the game.

But maybe missing the last year and the offers he got this summer — the Cavaliers can cut him in the first months of the season and pay him just $6 million — may have swung that attitude around. We’ll see.

Andrew Bynum’s contract contains no performance-based incentives, just $6 million guaranteed

Andrew Bynum

Andrew Bynum’s contract with the Cavaliers will pay him between $6 million and $24.79 million the next two seasons.

The two-year deal, the details of which were revealed by ShamSports.com, calls for base salaries of $12,250,000 and $12,540,000. However, only $6 million of the first season is guaranteed if Bynum is waived before 5 p.m. Jan 7 (and will become fully guaranteed if he doesn’t clear waivers before Jan. 10), and none of the second season is guaranteed until July 11, 2014.

Also, contrary to many reports, the deal contains no performance-based incentives.

So, Bynum will have until January to prove he’s either healthy or serious about his rehab – and that buys him only the rest of the 2013-14 season. Just as the 2014 offseason begins, he’ll have to have to prove himself once again to keep his contract.

The Cavaliers have given themselves a couple outs in case Bynum can’t contribute. Now, it’s up to him to prove he can – and there’s a big payday if does.

76ers replace risk-taking front office with risk-taking front office

Sam Hinkie

Confession: I liked the Andrew Bynum trade for the 76ers.

They were a middling team capable of making the playoffs but without the proven ability to win a series unless the opponent’s top player was injured. Their roster had limited flexibility, and two starters, Elton Brand and Andre Iguodala, were aging.

The 76ers didn’t necessarily need to make a high-risk, high-reward move, but that was certainly a defensible plan, and that’s what they did. Obviously, it didn’t work, and the previous front office, including President of Basketball Operations Rod Thorn, was pushed out.

Thorn, in an interview with David Aldridge of NBA.com (emphasis mine):

Me: So, what went wrong in Philly?

RT: We went for the stars when we went after Bynum. And it didn’t work out. And we gave up a ton of assets. Not only players, but we lost Iguodala, who was a terrific player. We lost (Nic) Vucevic, who was the second-best rebounder in the NBA. We lost (Maurice) Harkless, who has a chance to be a very good player, and we lost a future first, probably. Not for sure. But (Orlando) has the right for three years, if the first is not in the Lottery, they have the right to take it for three years. Now, chances are, it won’t be in the Lottery, and then we’ll have to give them two seconds. But we had accumulated assets. We made a major move, and it didn’t work out. Bynum never played a minute for us. And now he signs with Cleveland, and we gave up four major assets. That’s tough to overcome. And obviously the ownership was upset about the way the season went for us, and they got other people. It’s (not) a personal thing. They treated me great. I don’t have any problem with them at all. They wanted me to stay in an advisory position. But whether it’s pride or whether it’s ego or whatever, I just don’t like the way it ended. I’ve been in the league 50 years. I’ve done some pretty good things; some other things, not so good. But I’ve done some pretty good things. And I’d like to end it up on the right note. And that’s what it is for me more than anything…knock on wood, I’m relatively healthy, and I think I can help them in some ways. I’m looking forward to it.

In that same article, Aldridge also spoke with new 76ers general manager Sam Hinkie – an extremely revelatory look into Hinkie’s thinking, considering how little he’d shared with the media prior – and this quote stood out. Hinkie, via Aldridge: 

“From the first time I met the owners, they were very clear about where they wanted, and the kind of organization they wanted to build, and the kind of team they’d be proud of, and the kind of team they wouldn’t,” Hinkie said. “I’ve only thought about getting to there. It’s just a league that doesn’t reward treading water. And so sometimes you have to take some risks, and sometimes some risks are smarter to take for some teams, and less smart for other teams.”

This seems hypocritical of the 76ers owners, but it’s not. They trust Hinkie, not Thorn.

And that makes sense.

I liked the Bynum trade. I loved the Jrue Holiday trade. Nerlens Noel, if healthy, was by far the best prospect in the draft. In the meantime, his injury will help the 76ers secure a top 2014 pick, and the Pelican’s first rounder could be high, too.

That’s a great risk on Hinkie’s part – as long as his bosses trust him.

Kyrie Irving says he has no intention of leaving the Cavaliers

Cleveland Cavaliers v New Jersey Nets

LAS VEGAS — Kyrie Irving is already playing at an All-Star level for the Cleveland Cavaliers, and earned the honor in just his second NBA season.

He’s unquestionably the player who will lead the Cavs to the playoffs and beyond in the future, provided the team continues to make smart roster decisions as it appeared to this offseason by adding Mike Brown as head coach, while going out and getting Earl Clark, Jarrett Jack, and Andrew Bynum in free agency.

But Irving has to want to stay for that to happen, and a recent report had appeared that said he was “not long for Cleveland.”

Irving took to Twitter to immediately shoot it down.

“I wish I knew “someone in the know” for all my facts, maybe I would go into journalism as well!!” Irving said, before following that comment up with this: “Rumors are rumors.”

Irving reiterated his commitment to the franchise at USA Basketball mini-camp on Monday, saying he’s happy with the offseason acquisitions and has no plans to leave the franchise anytime soon.

“I’m a Cavalier right now,” Irving said. “I’m happy to be a Cavalier. I kind of had a sarcastic approach to it from what was said, because it was probably just a rumor started. I don’t think he knows anybody in my camp, and I don’t know who the guy is. But that type of stuff I don’t even pay attention to. Right now I’m a Cleveland Cavalier and I’m happy to be here.”

Irving followed up with a quick “no” when asked if he had any intentions of leaving his current team, before expressing some genuine optimism for the season ahead.

“I’m looking forward to it,” Irving said. “Especially seeing [number one overall draft pick Anthony Bennett] play, and getting to see [Andrew Bynum] play when he’s healthy. I’m really excited about these pieces.”

“Right now it’s just about coming together, and doing things as a team that will propel us over the top,” Irving said. “What makes the good teams great is that camaraderie and that brotherhood. And that’s what we have to develop.”

Mike Brown says Andrew Bynum, if healthy, will start at center for the Cavs

Los Angeles Lakers v Portland Trail Blazers

Now that Andrew Bynum is officially a member of the Cleveland Cavaliers and plans to be healthy enough to play a full season for his latest team, if that ends up happening (which, admittedly, would be a small miracle), there’s no doubt in the coach’s eyes what Bynum’s role will be.

Bynum has proven his worth in this league as an All-Star, so Cavs head coach Mike Brown won’t be making him prove himself again. If Bynum has no setbacks where his previously injured knees are concerned, he’ll immediately be inserted into the team’s starting lineup.

From Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal:

Cavs coach Mike Brown confirmed Friday that the Cavs aren’t really considering bringing Bynum off the bench in an effort to protect his knees and ease him back onto the court. If he can play, Bynum will start.

“He’s most likely going to start for us because he’s obviously an All-Star caliber player,” Brown said. “But we need to see where his health is as we progress toward training camp, into training camp, preseason and into the regular season. If everything fits right, if he’s completely healthy, no doubt about it, he’s our starter at center.”

It seems like a no-brainer of a decision — if you go out in free agency and get a center, even one with a consistent injury history whose work ethic was questioned last year, it’s because there aren’t a lot of other options already in place on the roster.

The rest of the Cavs’ frontcourt rotation includes Anderson Varejao, Tyler Zeller, Tristan Thompson, and Earl Clark. When healthy, there’s no doubt Bynum is the best option at the five, and Brown knows better than anyone just what Bynum can do for his basketball team.

Brown was the Lakers’ head coach in Bynum’s best season as a pro, when the big man was an All-Star and averaged 18.7 points, 11.8 rebounds, and 1.9 blocked shots in 35.2 minutes per game during the 2011-12 season.