Tag: Andrew Bynum

lebron bynum

LeBron: Heat ‘didn’t have much of a reaction at all’ to Pacers signing Andrew Bynum


NEW YORK — Andrew Bynum ended up signing with the Pacers on Saturday, after several teams reportedly had an initial interest in his services, including the defending champs.

Miami ultimately didn’t pursue Bynum, and he landed on the team that figures to be the biggest obstacle to the Heat returning to the Finals for a fourth straight season.

Before facing the Knicks on Saturday, however, the Heat didn’t seem all that concerned with Indiana’s latest roster addition.

“I don’t know what their perspective is,” Erik Spoelstra said, when I asked him for his thoughts on the signing. “We’re just focused on us right now. I’m sure out there it makes for compelling storylines. He fits their style in terms of being big and physical in the paint, but from our standpoint that doesn’t affect us.”

The part about Bynum fitting Indiana’s style is key, and likely the reason Miami passed. The Heat need active bigs who can defend on the perimeter, either in blowing up pick and rolls or simply in rotating as a part of their defensive scheme. Bynum may have been interesting on the surface, but a big like Greg Oden who’s already in place is much more well-suited to what the Heat have historically done defensively.

That may have been at least part of the reason that LeBron James similarly didn’t seem affected by the Heat’s strongest competition adding what may or may not be a player that will ultimately fortify the roster.

“We didn’t have much of a reaction at all,” James said. “We talked about it [Saturday] morning — guys said they’d seen it and that’s it. We didn’t have a conversation about it.”

Report: Luol Deng shocked at mess that is the Cavaliers

Jimmy Butler, Luol Deng

When Luol Deng was traded from the Bulls to Cleveland, he was coming from the only team he had known in his nine-plus NBA seasons. His Chicago teams, especially under head coach Tom Thibodeau in recent years, have been the epitome of professionalism in pursuing winning above all else.

The Cavaliers, apparently, are the complete opposite.

Deng reportedly is shocked at some of the goings on in his new surroundings, the particulars of which are detailed by Mitch Lawrence of the New York Daily News:

As Deng recently told one close friend, “the stuff going on in practice would never be tolerated by the coaching staff or the front office back in Chicago. It’s a mess.”

Deng was brought in to help clean it up when he arrived in a deal for Andrew Bynum on Jan. 7. But since then, he’s seen players get thrown out of practice, take off their uniform tops at halftime and threaten not to play, mouth off to Brown and generally act like spoiled brats. …

There is no accountability, as Dion Waiters found out when he was kicked out of practice last week but still got his usual minutes against the Knicks.

Mike Brown may have done an adequate job when he had LeBron James on the roster during his first stint in Cleveland, but his personality is geared toward basketball more than it is charismatic leadership or taking on the role of a disciplinarian.

When things start to go bad on one of Brown’s team, they snowball to a level that gets out of control extremely quickly — which is exactly what happened when he was relieved of his duties as coach of the Lakers just five games into last season.

There are real problems with personalities in the Cavaliers locker room — Waiters is immature, and Irving lacks the level of star power to command enough respect. The accountability needs to come from the top, and it doesn’t seem like Brown or GM Chris Grant are able to get the players on the same page.

The good news for Deng is that he’s an unrestricted free agent once this season is finished. The Cavaliers, however, will be stuck with this mess moving forward unless the required changes are made, which seemingly need to take place at multiple levels of the organization.

Larry Bird says notion that Pacers signed Bynum to keep him from Heat is ‘the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard’

larry bird pacers

The Pacers signed Andrew Bynum for the remainder of the season, and some think it was a move based purely in defense — off the court, much more than on it.

Indiana has been the best team in the East over the first half of the season, and team chemistry has been at at all-time high. Head coach Frank Vogel has his players locked in on the singular goal of finishing the regular season with the league’s best record, so if there are any postseason Game 7s this year, they’ll be played on the Pacers’ home floor.

Adding a questionable personality in the middle of a successful season like this one seems to be a risky move for the Pacers, at least on the surface. Unless, of course, they have little use for Bynum in the grand scheme of things, and simply wanted to make sure he didn’t land on another contender’s roster.

That’s all pure nonsense to Pacers GM Larry Bird, however, who wasn’t exactly kind in responding to that specific allegation.

From Mark Montieth of Pacers.com:

“I ain’t worried about next year,” team president Larry Bird said following the Pacers’ game-day shootaround on Saturday. “We’re in the now. We’re going to do everything we can to go as far as we possibly can.” …

Bird scoffed at the notion that the Pacers might be signing Bynum merely to keep him away from Miami or other contending teams.

“We don’t have the money to throw around and let them sit on our bench,” he said. “That’s about the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard.”

The Heat were said to be one of the teams interested in Bynum once he became available, and the Pacers’ reported interest came a little bit later. Most assumed that Indiana would only grab Bynum as a preventative measure, in order to ensure that Miami didn’t scoop up another big body to deal with Roy Hibbert come playoff time.

But the reality is that Bynum isn’t really a fit for what the Heat do defensively, which has historically involved more active bigs who have been expected to be able to cover the ground necessary to get out to the perimeter on defensive rotations.

It’s been clear from the preseason that the Pacers are all-in this year, and Bird knows better than anyone how slim the window can be for a team’s title chances. He clearly believes Bynum is an upgrade to the bench and nothing else, but the fact that the Heat or another contender can’t have him now certainly doesn’t hurt Indiana’s long-term prospects.

It’s official: Pacers sign Andrew Bynum for rest of season

Chicago Bulls v Cleveland Cavaliers

UPDATE  #2 11:02 a.m.: It’s official, the Pacers have announced that Andrew Bynum has signed with Indiana for the remainder of the season.

Bynum had wanted to play for more than the league minimum (we don’t yet know the details of the contract yet but the Pacers could offer more than the minimum) and for a contender, he got those things in Indiana.

“It really wasn’t a hard decision, I think it’s the right fit for me and, in all honesty, I think we’ve got the best chance of winning,” Bynum said in a statement released by the Pacers. “It will be great to back up Roy and I’ll do whatever I can to help this team.”

“We are obviously happy to have him join our team,” Pacers President of Basketball Operations Larry Bird said in a statement. “He gives us added size, he is a skilled big man and he has championship experience. With the minutes he gets, he should be a valuable addition.”

 This gives the Pacers an even bigger and more formidable front line. They start Roy Hibbert up front with David West and now off the bench can bring Bynum, Ian Mahinmi, Luis Scola and Chris Copeland. Just as importantly for them, the Miami Heat can’t sign Bynum and throw him at Indiana in what seems an inevitable Eastern Conference Finals matchup. 

UPDATE 8:53 a.m.: Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports reports that “barring an unforeseen snag,” Indiana will sign Andrew Bynum today.

8:00 a.m.: Conventional wisdom has been the only reason the Indiana Pacers were in the discussion to sign Andrew Bynum was to keep him away from the Heat. However, since Greg Oden has played fairly well in limited minutes for Miami, talk of signing Bynum to bring him to South Beach kind of cooled and interest in Bynum overall seemed lukewarm.

Now it appears the Pacers are close to inking a deal with Bynum.

At least that’s the report from the Indy Star, something confirmed by Brian Windhorst of ESPN. Bynum and his agent met with the Pacers Friday night, according to the Indy Star.

Bynum’s agent David Lee told The Indianapolis Star that he and Bynum were in town. According to Lee, Bynum and the Pacers have not reached a contractual agreement.

“(Bynum) has not signed as yet,” Lee said on Friday night.

The Pacers have All-Star center Roy Hibbert as the starter and bring Ian Mahinmi off the bench in a rotation that has worked very well — the Pacers at 35-10 have the best record in the East. They are strong up front, a defensive force — they are not signing Bynum to plug a hole in their rotation. Which makes the signing curious, if it goes through.

Bynum started the season injured under contract with the Cleveland Cavaliers. He went on to play 24 games for them, starting 19, and he averaged 8.4 points a game on just 41.9 percent shooting, plus he grabbed 5.3 rebounds a game. On the court he was limited and with that lost favor with coach Mike Brown. Off the court he was enough of a distraction that the team suspended Bynum the day after Christmas. The Cavaliers traded his contract at the deadline to the Bulls, who instantly waived him.

Bynum has ongoing knee issues which have required multiple surgeries and there are questions of if Bynum has the will, dedication and love for the game to push through them in play.

Bynum was a free agent for more than two weeks and what was holding teams back was both the concerns about his desire and that he reportedly wants more than the league minimum to play (and teams were loath to offer that)

If the Pacers do sign Bynum at whatever may get a little run, but mostly this would be a preventative strike.

Cavaliers GM Chris Grant rips team for “lack of effort”

Brooklyn Nets v Cleveland Cavaliers

I imagine Chris Grant’s seat is feeling a little warm.

He’s the general manager of the Cleveland Cavaliers, a team that has been awash in high draft picks in recent years — including last season’s No. 1, used on Anthony Bennett — who was told by his owner publicly it’s time to start making the playoffs.

And even in a putrid Eastern Conference, even after getting Luol Deng in a trade, the Cavaliers are 16-29 and three games out of the playoffs.

Wednesday Grant lit into his team’s effort speaking to the Akron Beacon Journal.

“The lack of effort is just not acceptable,” Grant said. “It’s not who we are and who we want to be. It’s got to be addressed head on. There’s no excuses for that, but we’ve seen our guys compete and execute consistently and that’s really what we’ve got to do a better job of….

“We’re in a tough stretch,” Grant said. “We came off that West Coast trip and that Denver game. We played good basketball. We played really good basketball and even in this tough stretch we’ve played a half or two of good basketball. Unfortunately, we haven’t played two full halves. All we can do is continue to stress and push that. We know it’s there because we’ve done it and we have to hold people accountable to it.”

That felt like a jab at coach Mike Brown — who Grant hired this off-season.

It’s also clearly a jab at the players, and again the roster is all about Grant’s choices (he’s been the GM since 2010). The Cavaliers have been flush with top draft picks in recent seasons and have All-Star Kyrie Irving to show for it (although the trajectory of his career feels different right now than it did a year ago, and the buzz is he is telling people he wants out, although he will end up taking a second contract there one way or another) and a whole lot of guys not living up to the hype — Dion Waiters, Tristan Thompson, Bennett. Plus it was Grant that took a reasonable gamble on Andrew Bynum, but one that failed miserably.

There are clearly some locker room issues in Cleveland, with some of it centered around Waiters but clearly no veteran leaders who could clean that mess up.

There also seems to be some sense around the organization they really thought (or think) LeBron James could return this summer. Which borders on the kind of delusional thinking that usually lands one in a room with padded walls.

All of which is to say the issues in Cleveland run deeper than effort on the court, that is just a symptom.