Tag: Andrew Bogut

2015 NBA Finals - Game Three

Report: Shawn Marion, other Cavaliers veterans may see run in Game 5


CLEVELAND — The Cleveland Cavaliers looked worn down and tired. LeBron James stopped taking the ball all the way to the rim, Matthew Dellavedova looked flat footed trying to guard Stephen Curry, and coach David Blatt admited as much after the Cavaliers dropped Game 4 to even the series.

“Tonight was the third game in five days, including the trip back from the West Coast, and it seemed to have an impact on us, yes,” Blatt said when asked if fatigue was a factor.

Blatt has stuck with a seven-man rotation for the most part since Kyrie Irving was injured, but the short bench and the energy expended to guard the Warriors in the Finals is wearing down the Cavaliers.

Which has led rumors Blatt may finally reach deeper into his bench, tapping veterans like Shawn Marrion and Mike Miller, among others, for bigger roles. From Brian Windhorst at ESPN.

With several players, James and Dellavedova especially, looking worn down from the demands in the playoffs, players have begun to privately grumble that Blatt needs to use his whole roster.

With Warriors coach Steve Kerr going to a perimeter-heavy offense with Andre Iguodala in for Andrew Bogut, the feel is Blatt could take another look at Miller and perhaps give veteran Shawn Marion, who has yet to play in the series, a look. With the Warriors’ depth on the wing, the Cavs ended up being stretched exceedingly thin.

Several sources said Marion, who already has announced he’ll retire following the season, is especially itching to get a chance. He’s recently been bothered by a calf injury and also dealt with a hip injury in the regular season but is healthy and able to go.

Blatt has been sitting those guys for a reason, but these may be the desperate times where he leans on those veterans hoping for at least 10 good minutes. Miller has performed on big stages before, Marion can still make plays. They don’t need to dominate, just hold down the fort.

Ideally, those would be minutes LeBron could rest. In Game 4 the Cavaliers had trimmed a double-digit Warriors’ lead to three but when LeBron went to the bench for just a couple minutes of rest, the lead quickly ballooned back up to 10. The Cavaliers could never really close the gap again.

The Cavaliers catch a break with a couple days off between games 4 and 5 (and between 6 and 7 if it goes that far). They are banking on some rest and just better shooting to pull them back up in Game 5.

But a little help from the veterans down the bench would be a big boost, too.

Warriors coach Steve Kerr: ‘I lied’

Steve Kerr

After the Warriors’ Game 3 loss, Steve Kerr said he didn’t anticipate changing his starting lineup. Asked again yesterday morning, he said Andrew Bogut would start at center. Asked yet again yesterday pregame, Kerr said there would be no change to Golden State’s starting lineup.

Well, Andre Iguodala started for Bogut in Game 4.


We made the decision this morning. And so when I was asked today – I think Tim Kawakami asked me if Bogut was starting – I lied.

No, I did. I mean, I lied.

I figure I have two press conferences on the day of the game, so I’m asked a lot of strategic questions. So my options were tell the truth ‑ and I was asked both at shootaround and before the game. So, if I tell the truth, it’s the equivalent of me knocking on David Blatt’s door and saying, “Hey, this is what we’re going to do.” I could evade the question, which would start this Twitter phenomenon. Who is going to start for the Warriors? Or I could lie.

So, I lied. Sorry.

But I don’t think they hand you the trophy based on morality. They give it to you if you win. So, sorry about that.

Not every coach could get away with this without major backlash. Kerr will.

He has a great relationship with the media overall, and he put this in the most friendly tone possible. Everyone will laugh this off.

But this should be an important lesson to reporters and readers of those reporters.

I believe most professional coaches and athletes would prefer to be truthful publicly. But they have priorities that rank far above being truthful publicly.

So, many of them are willing to lie publicly if it helps achieve something they deem more important – like winning a championship or securing the best contract possible. That willingness only increases when they’re granted the cloak of anonymity. Then, they can lie with little to no repercussions.

If a reporter had granted Kerr anonymity to leak that Golden State wouldn’t change starters, not only would he have still thrown off the Cavaliers, Kerr wouldn’t have to answer for his lie. We’d never know he was the source.

Situations like that play out countless times. Sometimes, it’s possible to verify a claim given by someone granted anonymity. But sometimes, it’s not. If no assistant coaches or players were talking, nobody could have successfully checked whether the Warriors actually were keeping the same starting lineup. It would have been easy for Kerr to find a reporter willing to publish “Warriors won’t change starters in Game 4, according to a source.”

But Kerr attached his name to his lie, and that’s a big reason he should escape this without backlash.

Kerr isn’t competing to explain his game plan to the public. He’s competing to win a championship.

If you don’t understand that – and this extends especially to any reporter who would have allowed Kerr to anonymously leak that the starters would remain the same – that’s your fault.

Small ball works, Golden State handles Cleveland comfortably to even series


CLEVELAND — They went small from the opening tip. The ball flew around the court. Three pointers fell at a 40 percent clip, led by the MVP hitting four. They pushed the ball off the other team’s makes and misses, then attacked the rim. They made the extra pass.

Put simply, the Golden State Warriors looked more like the 67-win Warriors from the regular season again.

And the result was a comfortable win 103-82 victory for Golden State, behind 22 points each from Andre Iguodala and Stephen Curry.

With the win, the Warriors evened the NBA Finals at 2-2 and are heading home for Game 5 Sunday.

And now it’s David Blatt and the Warriors’ turn to come up with answers, because the first big adjustment of the Finals came from Steve Kerr — and it worked.

“We did it for pace and floor spacing and just to get the tempo going…” Kerr said of the switch to starting small. “We controlled the tempo and the rhythm of the game. But that I think had more to do with us competing and getting to long rebounds and loose balls. I thought the first three games they were the more competitive team. Maybe it’s our first trip to The Finals, we thought we can play hard. It’s not just about playing hard. It’s about playing every single possession like it’s your last. And I thought tonight our effort took a step up, and that’s why we were able to win.”

“It made sense when (Kerr) told us just because we’ve been getting off to such slow starts,” Curry said of being told about the switch. “When we have that lineup out there in parts of the game, we were able to turn defensive stops into transition and just pick the tempo and the pace of the game up.”

Kerr altered his starting lineup for Game 4, starting Andre Iguodala in place of big center Andrew Bogut. This small lineup had been +18.8 per 48 minutes in limited run (20 minutes in the Finals) but Steve Kerr was going to use it to pick up the pace and make this a more Warriors friendly pace. It worked.

Well, not for the first minute, the Cavaliers raced out to a 7-0 lead (including a no-look LeBron James feed to Timofey Mozgov). But then Stephen Curry hit a couple threes, the small lineup opened up the floor, the attacked the rim, and the Warriors started to look like themselves again.With balanced attack (Green and Barnes each had five early) and Warriors came back to lead 22-20 and never looked back from there.

The Warriors pulled away and were up 54-42 at the half. They shot 46.5 percent overall and hit 6-of-17 from three in the first half — not vintage numbers for the Warriors, but far better than we had seen through three games. Most importantly Curry got some help, from Draymond Green who had 13 points on 4-of-7 shooting in the first half, and Andrew Iguodala had 9 points (all in the first quarter). The energy of the Warriors was just different this game.

“I think if we played as hard as we were playing the last couple of games, it would have won us probably 67 regular season games, but it would have lost us the Finals 4-1, and that’s what we had to change,” Green said. “And we were able to do that tonight.  That’s what helped us out a lot.  That’s what helped me out.”

Meanwhile, the Cavaliers were 2-of-13 from three in the first half and 4-of-27 for the game — the new Warriors lineup gave them looks, couldn’t hit them. On the night, the Cavaliers were 6-of-29 on uncontested looks.

“We didn’t make shots,” Blatt said. “And that put a little bit more pressure on (LeBron), too, because he was passing the ball, and the normal shots that we make in that situation, we didn’t.”

On the other end, the Cavs defense in the paint wasn’t the same when Mozgov had to come much farther from the perimeter to protect the rim compared to how close he was with Bogut.

But the third quarter was far more the Cavaliers kind of game. The Cavaliers defended well and the Warriors were 5-of-15 from the floor, plus the Cavaliers out-rebounded Warriors 17-6 in third. All that led to a 12-2 run midway through the third cut the lead all the way down to three.

The Cavaliers tried to punish the small lineup by going inside, Timofey Mozgov led the Cavaliers with 28 points. He did an excellent job sealing off smaller guys and getting early, deep position all night long.

But at the start of the fourth, LeBron had to rest — he said he was “gassed” — and the Warriors got back in their flow and stretched the lead back up to double-digits. Fatigue was an issue.

“Tonight was the third game in five days, including the trip back from the West Coast, and it seemed to have an impact on us, yes,” Blatt said.

The Warriors’ best lineup had Shaun Livingston on the floor, and that made things happen. Plus the Warriors got good minutes from David Lee, who had 9 points on the night.