Tag: Anaheim Royals


Questions about television deal cast some doubt on Kings move


It’s still a long shot the Kings stay in Sacramento — in the end you are asking a bunch of entrepreneurial, rich capitalists to vote against one of their own moving his business to a place he can (theoretically) make more money. It’s hard to get them to vote no.

But they may be getting close.

For the next two days Oklahoma City Thunder owner Clay Bennett and league counsel Harvey Benjamin will be in Sacramento checking out the claims Mayor Kevin Johnson made to the NBA’s Board of Governors. Specifically, that there is a lot more money out there in Sacramento if the team stays. David Stern talked about roughly $9 million more in sponsorship and ticket sales (Johnson told the media $7 million).

But the bigger part of the picture is that the Anaheim end of the deal may not be all it is cracked up to be, reports Sam Amick at Sports Illustrated.

While the outcome is far from certain here, there are strong indications that the Maloof family, which owns the Kings, is facing enough opposition to the move to force it back to Sacramento. The Maloofs have already been pushed into two overtimes, as the original April 18 deadline to file for relocation was extended twice and now sits at May 2….

Specifically, a source with knowledge of the proposal revealed that the television rights riches that had long been seen as a major motivating factor for the Maloofs aren’t quite as lucrative as they had hoped. And while it had been assumed they would attempt to fill the programming void left by the Lakers at Fox Sports West due to their recent megadeal with Time Warner that starts in 2012, two sources said that is not the case.

The plan as presented in New York included a possible partnership worth $20 million annually with KDOC, an Orange County-based, independent television station that is co-owned by the very man working so hard to make this move happen. Anaheim Ducks owner Henry Samueli, who operates the Honda Center where the Maloofs’ team would play and has already committed $50 million through city bonds to help cover their cost of relocation, reportedly teamed with Bert Ellis to pay $149.5 million for the station in 2006.

KDOC is a minor player on the Southern California television scene. It shows things like old “Andy Griffith Show,” “All in the Family” and “Barney Miller” reruns. It’s Thursday night prime-time lineup (tonight) is a “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” rerun, followed by “Star Trek: The Next Generation” then an original “Star Trek” series episode (the one where they try to court martial Kirk).

If this television deal is worth about $20 million, then it is not the monster deal Kings move supporters had touted, which we had been told was well upwards of $30 million. The Kings currently make $11 million on their television deal in Sacramento, according to Amick. The average team is rumored to make about $20 million on its television deal, but if you’re moving to the second largest television market in the country do you expect and average deal?

In the end it’s not about a television deal — NBA Commissioner David Stern in a press conference last week made it very clear it is about the building. Current Power Balance (former Arco) Arena just doesn’t cut it and Stern left no doubt what he thought of the structure. While Anaheim’s Honda Center is nearly two decades old and needs work — from the players’ locker rooms and a practice court to the media facilities — it has far more luxury suites and a large corporate base outside the building to snap those up. (Even if there are questions about how much of that luxury suite money flows to the Maloofs in the deal.)

If the mayor and Sacramento officials can’t convince the NBA that a new stadium is around the corner, then they will have a very hard time retaining the Kings.

But past franchise moves — like the Sonics leaving Seattle to become the Oklahoma City Thunder — essentially got a rubber stamp from the Board of Governors. The fact that the deadline has twice been extended to allow further negotiations and investigation shows not everyone with the NBA is comfortable with the deal.

Odd are it still goes through, but for Kings fans there is hope.

Billionaire makes last-minute run to keep Kings in Sacramento

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It’s a Hail Mary.

But if you’re going to call a Hail Mary, having a billionaire making the toss helps.

That’s what happened in the saga of the Kings potential move out of Sacramento on Thursday.

The Maloof brothers, the owners of the Kings, made their case for needing to pack up their franchise and move to Anaheim to the NBA Board of Governors — the other owners — at a meeting in New York. The vibe out of that meeting was basically cautious.

According to multiple reports, the Maloofs preached about how they swear they are not in as much debt as has been reported. Basically, they’re good, the market is the problem. Of course, that begs the question of why they needed a loan from Henry Samueli, the operator of the Honda Center? And why the terms of the lease are so bad? But okay.

The surprising news was that Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson (yes, the former Suns player Kevin Johnson) told that same board he had billionaire Ron Burkle ready to buy the team and keep them in Sacramento. Burkle is a grocery-store magnate and a big-time catch — a billionaire buddy of Bill Clinton who did big time fundraising for his wife. He runs in powerful circles. In an NBA where owners need to be richer and better connected, he is a whale (to use the gambling parlance). David Stern likes whales.

Burkle confirmed in a press release he wants in.

Problem is, the Maloofs continue to tell everyone they are not going to sell. They were emphasizing that again yesterday. Remember that George Maloof Sr. – the father of the Maloof brothers — bought the Rockets in 1979 and they sold it after he died a couple years later. They have said before they regretted that move, and that likely plays into them holding on to their asset.

So now what? Good luck guessing. It’s hard to picture the rich capitalist owners telling the Maloof brothers they cannot move to make more money. But Lakers owner Jerry Buss is trying to make the Kings pay a heavy relocation fee to move into what he sees as part of his market. If he (and Clippers owner Donald Sterling) succeeds, then the cost of the move might be too great and the deal would fall apart.

Then there’s the Burkle Hail Mary.

Maybe what matters most is Burkle saying he would be willing to buy a team and move it to Sacramento. Well, if a new stadium is built. It’s always about the stadium. But with a team for sale down in New Orleans where efforts to find local ownership are going slowly, it is something to watch. Do they have hornets in Sacramento?

Bang the drum slowly: Tonight may be last game in Sacramento

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Ron Artest reacted like a lot of people — he didn’t really want to believe it could happen.

When the former Kings star was asked about he and the Lakers heading up to Sacramento for what may well be the final game ever for the Kings in Sacramento, Artest kept saying the move was not set in stone and there was hope. He added he had not followed the story that closely but there had to be hope.

He also understood where the Kings fans were coming from.

“I can see why (they are concerned), they have supported that team for a long time,” Artest said. “Hopefully the Kings can stay in Sacramento.”


But not likely. Team owners the Maloof brothers are pushing ahead with plans to take the team to Anaheim. There are efforts to keep the team in the California capital, but they are crazy longshots. Former King Chris Webber talked on national television Tuesday about buying into the team and finding a way to restructure some of the debt (the $77 million loan from Sacramento) on the Kings owners.

But a number of things have been tried over the last few years, and nothing has seemed to work. Anaheim offers a ready arena with more luxury boxes and a larger television market, and those two things mean instant cash flow. Those are the things driving the deal. That and the debt of the Maloof brothers. Forces that ignore fans and tradition.

If it is the last game, it is only fitting it is the rival Lakers. It should end no other way.

But it shouldn’t end at all.