Tag: Anaheim NBA

Los Angeles Lakers v Sacramento Kings

Kings television deal could be reworked as part of Sacramento effort

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If it’s all about the television deal, Sacramento still has hope. Comcast is willing to talk.

One of the key reasons the Kings owners — the Maloof brothers — reportedly wanted out of Sacramento was a bad television deal, something they could do much better with in the massive Southern California market.

But an official with Comcast told the Sacramento Bee they’d be willing to talk renegotiation of that deal to get the Kings more money.

Adding to the drama Thursday, the general manager of the TV network that broadcasts Kings games, Larry Eldridge of Comcast SportsNet California, told The Bee that his station is willing to increase the value of its contract with the team if it stays in Sacramento…. He said the station was willing to negotiate a new agreement with the Kings but wouldn’t comment on how much more CSN might pay for rights fees.

The current deal has been reported as netting the Kings roughly $11 million a year. Eldridge said a new deal could be significantly more lucrative for the Kings.

Reportedly the deal the Kings have struck in Southern California — at least as a stopgap for a year — is a $20 million deal with KDOC, an obscure and little-watched Southern California channel. KDOC just happens to be partially owned by Henry Samueli, who also operates the Honda Center and had set up a $50 million loan to the Kings as part of the move.

If Comcast upped the Kings offer, would the gap be that great?

There seems to be a real optimism around Sacramento that the city is pushing hard to save the team while the financial deal in Anaheim is a house of cards. The NBA appears to be doing a serious investigation of both sides of this deal.

But in the end, it’s still about the building.

Even if the Kings stay for another year, they would be on a strict timeline to get plans, financing and more in place for a new arena. There have been several failed attempts to get a new building approved in Sacramento and David Stern has said that is the ultimate issue. A number of the NBA group meetings were about a potential new building.

But now there is hope in Sacramento, and there was not that a couple weeks ago.

Report: Lakers, Clippers lack votes to block Kings Anaheim move

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The Honda Center in Anaheim is 34 miles away from Staples Center, which means it may take 30 minutes and it may take two-and-a-half hours to drive there on Los Angeles freeways.

But it’s close enough that the Lakers and Clippers do not want the Kings moving to Anaheim. It just appears they can’t do nothing about it.

Reports have been that the Board of Governors (the owners) vote to extend the Maloofs negotiating period to April 18 was 27-2, with the Lakers and Clippers voting no. Marc Stein reports at ESPN the Lakers and Clippers are having little success in gathering no votes now.

But the Lakers and Clippers would need 14 other teams to oppose the Kings’ relocation when it reaches the voting stage. They will undoubtedly have a few supporters — big-market teams such as Golden State that don’t want to see another franchise move right into their neighborhood as the Kings are planning in Southern California — but one source said there are already strong indications in circulation that the Kings will be able to secure the minimum 16 votes required (and maybe more) to clinch the simple majority needed to ratify any proposed relocation.

It would appear that the best L.A.’s teams can hope for is a hefty relocation fee that could dissuade brothers Joe and Gavin Maloof, who co-own the Kings. Relocation fees in the NBA are “discretionary,” meaning that the fee is established by the league’s Board of Governors and varies from relocation to relocation. The Seattle SuperSonics, for example, paid a $30 million relocation fee when they moved to Oklahoma City. It remains to be seen if the Maloofs are asked to pay more.

It isn’t hard to imagine other owners thinking the Clippers and Jerry Buss’ Lakers — perennially two of the league’s profit makers — don’t need or deserve a big payout for a third team entering the market. (Yes, the Clippers are profitable, very profitable. Low payroll in a big market with big local television revenue and plenty of luxury boxes in house. Why do you think Donald Sterling can run them the way he does, he still makes money so there is no pressure to change.)

This is just another sad sign that the momentum of this move is picking up steam and the fans of Sacramento are going to get screwed. The Anaheim City Council is expected to vote next week on issuing bonds for some renovation of the Honda Center to make it NBA ready, one of the few final hurdles to this deal.

Still hope in Sacramento, so fans keep fighting

Clippers Kings Basketball

The Sacramento Kings are close to becoming the Anaheim Royals.

It’s about money. It’s always about money. It’s luxury boxes and television markets and ways to pay off debts. It’s not about the fans — the fans in Sacramento that have been loyal to this team and are about to be screwed over.

But those fans are not giving up. The deal is not finalized a number of things could unravel it. Longshot things, but it could happen. So Kings fans keep pressing their case, hoping against hope.

Tom Ziller — one of the OG NBA bloggers and one of the elite — gave a rallying cry to Kings fans to keep up the fight at Sactown Royalty.

We fight because something can be hopeless only if we fail to provide hope. So long as we believe that the universe will smile upon our cause, so long as we believe we will be pinched and woken from this nightmare, so long as there is Tomorrow, we maintain hope. Hey, we survived the Eric Musselman era, right?

If the NBA board of governors shock the world and reject or delay the move … if Anaheim refuses to budge on a lease or revenue-sharing agreement … if the Maloofs can’t secure the funding to pay off their loan to Sacramento and a relocation fee … if anything derails what looks so certain, we don’t want to be caught flat-footed. If anything happens, we have months — months — to mobilize and help push an arena plan through. Whether it’s helping convince a prospective local owner that committed fans await, or helping Mayor Johnson canvas neighborhoods to earn support for a hotel and rental car surcharge to help fund the Taylor plan, or drumming season ticket support to make sure PBP is packed from 101 Row AA to 217 Row S — we will be there, ready to capitalize.

You know how Geoff Petrie, at his best, is ready to pounce on any opportunity? That’s us, right now. We hurt, we fume. But we’re ready. If it does happen — if they do leave, we’ll be right here. Fuming. Hurting. Fighting for an arena, fighting for a basketball team to return.

We know the odds are long. But if a chance of keeping our Kings in Sacramento exists, we will fight.